Các bài viết của GS. THÁI CÔNG TỤNG

(Update Jan. 5, 2018)
​Xin phổ biến/đăng tải rộng rãi.
Rất đa tạ.
Thay mặt Anh Em nhóm Lymha,
Hà Trung Liêm​

CÁC BÀI VIẾT CỦA GIÁO SƯ THÁI CÔNG TỤNG ĐƯỢC ĐĂNG TẢI TẠI TRANG BLOG MEKONG-CUULONG.
(Để đọc bài xin bấm vào đường kết nối màu xanh)

1. Sông ngòi miền Bắc Việt Nam

2. Sông ngòi miền Trung

3. Sông ngòi miền Cao Nguyên Việt Nam Continue reading “Các bài viết của GS. THÁI CÔNG TỤNG”

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Ca Mau’s fishing villages prepare for Tet

vietnamnet

One month ahead of the lunar New Year Festival or Tet, fishing villages in Ca Mau are busy preparing their special product for Tet market: dried siamese gourami or Trichogaster pectoralis [Cá khô bổi U Minh, hay Khô cá sặc rằn]. .

Ca Mau's fishing villages prepare for Tet, social news, vietnamnet bridge, english news, Vietnam news, news Vietnam, vietnamnet news, Vietnam net news, Vietnam latest news, vn news, Vietnam breaking news

Used to be found in river, siamese gourami was first bred by farmers in Ca Mau in 2010. Continue reading “Ca Mau’s fishing villages prepare for Tet”

Vietnam masters rice-seed production technology

Last update 08:15 | 19/10/2017
VietNamNet Bridge – Vietnam can control up to 70.5 percent of seed production technology, with 90 percent for purebred rice and 66 percent for hybrid rice.


vietnam economy, business news, vn news, vietnamnet bridge, english news, Vietnam news, news Vietnam, vietnamnet news, vn news, Vietnam net news, Vietnam latest news, Vietnam breaking news, hybrid rice, PVPO, rice seed production

The figures were released by Pham Ngoc Ly, deputy general director of Vinaseed (Vietnam National Seed Corporation), who presided over the research project which assessed the current situation, technological capability and demand for technology renovation in hybrid rice breeding in the north and central coastal areas. Continue reading “Vietnam masters rice-seed production technology”

Student uses catfish fat to create bioplastics

Last update 07:10 | 08/01/2018
VietNamNet Bridge – Vu Thị Mai Anh, 23, a student at the Hanoi University of Education, has conducted research on isolating and selecting bacteria capable of converting basa fish (catfish) fat into Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). 

vietnam economy, business news, vn news, vietnamnet bridge, english news, Vietnam news, news Vietnam, vietnamnet news, vn news, Vietnam net news, Vietnam latest news, Vietnam breaking news, catfish fat, PHA, biotechnology

Vu Thi Mai Anh

After being subdivided and selected, microorganisms are cultured in catfish fat and converted into environmentally friendly bioplastics.

The research won first prize in the field of food technology at Euréka 2017, a contest for technology students organized by the HCM City Youth Union. Continue reading “Student uses catfish fat to create bioplastics”

Arab League to Lobby UN to Recognize Palestinian State

VOA


Jordanian Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi (R), and Arab League Secretary-General Ahmed Aboul Gheit speak during their joint news conference in Amman, Jordan, Jan. 6, 2018.

Jordanian Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi (R), and Arab League Secretary-General Ahmed Aboul Gheit speak during their joint news conference in Amman, Jordan, Jan. 6, 2018.

Arab states will soon embark on a diplomatic drive to persuade the United Nations to recognize a Palestinian state with East Jerusalem as its capital on territory captured by Israel in the 1967 war, Jordan’s Foreign Minister Ayman Safadi said.

Six Arab foreign ministers met in Amman on Saturday to follow up on earlier decisions taken by the Arab League to counter U.S. President Donald Trump’s move in December to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, a decision that overturned decades of U.S. policy on the Middle East. Continue reading “Arab League to Lobby UN to Recognize Palestinian State”

2018 brings no end to violence against Rohingyas: UN

Dailystar 12:44 PM, January 08, 2018 / LAST MODIFIED: 01:12 PM, January 08, 2018

2,400 Rohingyas enter Bangladesh in Dec last

UNB, Cox’s Bazar

Rohingya people were still arriving here – the New Year bringing no end to the reports of violence and fears, which forced them to flee their homes in Myanmar, says the IOM on Monday.

Over 2,400 Rohingyas are estimated to have arrived in Bangladesh during December 2017, with more people continuing to arrive each day as 2018 begins, according to the UN Migration Agency.
Continue reading “2018 brings no end to violence against Rohingyas: UN”

The crime family at the centre of Asia’s animal trafficking network

theguardian

Bach brothers based in Vietnam and Thailand are responsible for smuggling thousands of tonnes of elephant ivory, rhino horn and other endangered species

Bach Mai aka ‘Boonchai’ (left) and his brother Bach Van Limh are key players who control the smuggling gateway from Thailand into Laos.
 Bach Mai aka ‘Boonchai’ (left) and his brother Bach Van Limh are key players who control the smuggling gateway from Thailand into Laos.

There is a simple reason why there is always trouble in Nakhon Phanom. It is the reason why the US air force came here during the Vietnam war, and the reason why this dull and dusty town in north-east Thailand now serves as a primary gateway on the global animal trafficking highway. It is all to do with Continue reading “The crime family at the centre of Asia’s animal trafficking network”

Top 10 HAPPY environmental stories of 2017

Mongabay.com

  • Throughout 2017, scientists discovered new populations of rare wildlife, and rediscovered some species that were previously thought to be extinct.
  • Some countries created large marine protected areas, while a few others granted land rights to indigenous communities.
  • In 2017, we also saw the ever-increasing potential of technology to improve conservation monitoring and efforts.

The past year may have seemed like doom and gloom for the environment, but there was plenty to be thankful for. So once again, we bring you some of the happier environmental stories of 2017 (in no particular order). These include rediscoveries of species that were once thought to be extinct, local communities being granted land rights, and the emergence of new technologies that are boosting conservation efforts.

1. New populations of rare wildlife were found

This year, conservationists discovered some new populations of threatened wildlife. Take, for example, the helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil). A research team recorded a new and “unexpectedly rich population” of this critically endangered bird in western Borneo. For a species that is now nearly extinct because of poaching, this discovery boosts hope for its future.

It was good news for the Grauer’s gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) as well. Surveys in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Maiko National Park revealed several previously uncounted individuals of Grauer’s gorillas in just 1 percent of the park. The researchers think that there might be many more gorillas living inside the largely unexplored 10,885-square-kilometer (4,000-square-mile) park. Continue reading “Top 10 HAPPY environmental stories of 2017”

Ivory trade in China is now banned

by  on 2 January 2018

Why Do Land Mines Still Kill So Many?

NEW YORK TIMES

JAN. 6, 2018 SundayReview | EDITORIAL By THE EDITORIAL BOARD


An assortment of land mines and bomb parts that were removed from the ground in Afghanistan. Photos by Larry Towell/Magnum Photos

The world is rolling backward, and at a disturbingly faster pace, in the struggle to limit carnage from land mines and other booby-trap explosives. The most recent numbers, covering 2016, are appalling.

Known casualties that year came to 8,605, including 2,089 deaths, according to a new report by Landmine Monitor, a research arm of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. The toll was nearly 25 percent higher than the 6,967 maimed and dead counted a year earlier, and more than double the 3,993 in 2014. And these numbers are almost assuredly an undercount. “In some states and areas, numerous casualties go unrecorded,” Landmine Monitor said. Continue reading “Why Do Land Mines Still Kill So Many?”

World Bank – New research on development issues in Vietnam – Volume 10, number 1 (2018 January 8)

Download full report >>

Table of content

Agriculture and Rural development

• Market implications of the integration scenario of Southeast Asian rice markets.
• Understanding smallholder farmers’ capacity to respond to climate change in a coastal community in Central Vietnam.
• The water-land-food nexus of natural rubber production.
• Assessment of household risk management strategies for coastal aquaculture: the case of clam farming in Thaibinh Province, Vietnam.
• Agroforestry: Contribution to food security and climate-change adaptation and mitigation in Southeast Asia: WHITE PAPER.
• The role of State Forest Enterprises in the payments for Forest Environmental Services Programme in Vietnam.
• Enhancing farmers’ market power and income in the pig value chain; a case study in Bac Giang province, Vietnam.
• The political economy of policy exceptionalism during economic transition: the case of rice policy in Vietnam.
Continue reading “World Bank – New research on development issues in Vietnam – Volume 10, number 1 (2018 January 8)”