Ukraine: ‘Cycle of death, destruction’ must stop, UN chief tells Security Council

UN.org

The principal of a school in Chernihiv, Ukraine, surveys the damage caused during an aerial bombardment.

© UNICEF/Ashley Gilbertson VII Photo

The principal of a school in Chernihiv, Ukraine, surveys the damage caused during an aerial bombardment.

5 May 2022

Peace and Security

Briefing the Security Council on his shuttle diplomacy last week in Russia and Ukraine, Secretary-General António Guterres declared that he “did not mince words” during meetings with Presidents Putin and Zelenskyy, on the need to end the brutal conflict.

“I said the same thing in Moscow as I did in Kyiv…Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is a violation of its territorial integrity and of the Charter of the United Nations,” he told the Ambassadors.    

“It must end for the sake of the people of Ukraine, Russia, and the entire world…the cycle of death, destruction, dislocation and disruption must stop.” 

The UN chief said he had gone into an active war zone in Ukraine, after first travelling to Moscow, without much prospect of any ceasefire – as the east of the country continues to face “a full-scale ongoing attack”.

Tiếp tục đọc “Ukraine: ‘Cycle of death, destruction’ must stop, UN chief tells Security Council”

A brief lesson on Roe v. Wade

Washingtonpost.com

By Valerie Strauss

A crowd gathers outside the Supreme Court early on May 3 after a draft opinion was leaked, appearing to show that a majority of justices were ready to overturn the 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade. (Alex Brandon/AP)

Roe v. Wade, the historic 1973 Supreme Court decision that made abortion legal in the first trimester of a woman’s pregnancy, is in danger of being struck down by the conservative majority, according to news reports published Monday night.

According to this Washington Post article, a draft opinion published by Politico said that a majority of justices are ready to reverse the ruling — though until a decision has been formally announced, any vote that has been taken can be reconsidered. In any case, the leak itself was big news — an unprecedented breach of court protocol in modern times.

Supreme Court is ready to strike down Roe v. Wade, leaked draft shows

The following background on the case comes from the National Constitution Center, a nonprofit organization in Philadelphia with a congressional charter to disseminate information about the U.S. Constitution on a nonpartisan basis:

Tiếp tục đọc “A brief lesson on Roe v. Wade”

Russian troops use rape as ‘an instrument of war’ in Ukraine, rights groups allege

By Tara John, Oleksandra Ochman and Sandi Sidhu, CNN

Updated 0420 GMT (1220 HKT) April 22, 2022

Karina Yershova, right, is pictured with her grandmother in an undated photograph provided by the family.

Karina Yershova, right, is pictured with her grandmother in an undated photograph provided by the family.

Lviv, Ukraine (CNN)When Russian troops invaded Ukraine and began closing in on its capital, Kyiv, Andrii Dereko begged his 22-year-old stepdaughter Karina Yershova to leave the suburb where she lived.

But Yershova insisted she wanted to remain in Bucha, telling him: “Don’t talk nonsense, everything will be fine — there will be no war,” he said.

With her tattoos and long brown hair, Yershova stood out in a crowd, her stepfather said, adding that despite living with rheumatoid arthritis, she had a fiercely independent spirit: “She herself decided how to live.”

Yershova worked at a sushi restaurant in Bucha, and hoped to earn her university degree in the future, Dereko said: “She wanted to develop herself.”

Unclaimed and unidentified: Bucha empties its mass graves

Unclaimed and unidentified: Bucha empties its mass graves 03:24

As Russian soldiers surrounded Bucha in early March, Yershova hid in an apartment with two other friends. On one of the last occasions Dereko and his wife, Olena, heard from Yershova, she told them she had left the apartment to get food from a nearby supermarket.

Tiếp tục đọc “Russian troops use rape as ‘an instrument of war’ in Ukraine, rights groups allege”

US State Department: 2021 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

BUREAU OF DEMOCRACY, HUMAN RIGHTS, AND LABOR

 APRIL 12, 2022

The annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices – the Human Rights Reports – cover internationally recognized individual, civil, political, and worker rights, as set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international agreements. The U.S. Department of State submits reports on all countries receiving assistance and all United Nations member states to the U.S. Congress in accordance with the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Trade Act of 1974.

TRANSLATIONSShare

IN THIS SECTION /

OVERVIEW AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Preface

For nearly five decades, the United States has issued the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, which strive to provide a factual and objective record on the status of human rights worldwide – in 2021, covering 198 countries and territories.  The information contained in these reports could not be more vital or urgent given ongoing human rights abuses and violations in many countries, continued democratic backsliding on several continents, and creeping authoritarianism that threatens both human rights and democracy – most notably, at present, with Russia’s unprovoked attack on Ukraine.

Tiếp tục đọc “US State Department: 2021 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices”

Russia’s Brutality in Ukraine Has Roots in Earlier Conflicts

Its experience in a string of wars led to the conclusion that attacking civilian populations was not only acceptable but militarily sound.

nytimes.com

Ukrainian emergency workers at a maternity hospital damaged by shelling in Mariupol last week.
Ukrainian emergency workers at a maternity hospital damaged by shelling in Mariupol last week.Credit…Evgeniy Maloletka/Associated Press
Max Fisher

By Max Fisher

Published March 18, 2022Updated March 22, 2022

As Russian artillery and rockets land on Ukrainian hospitals and apartment blocksdevastating residential districts with no military value, the world is watching with horror what is, for Russia, an increasingly standard practice.

Its forces conducted similar attacks in Syria, bombing hospitals and other civilian structures as part of Russia’s intervention to prop up that country’s government.

Moscow went even further in Chechnya, a border region that had sought independence in the Soviet Union’s 1991 breakup. During two formative wars there, Russia’s artillery and air forces turned city blocks to rubble and its ground troops massacred civilians in what was widely seen as a deliberate campaign to terrorize the population into submission.

Now, Vladimir V. Putin, whose rise to Russia’s presidency paralleled and was in some ways cemented by the Chechen wars, appears to be deploying a similar playbook in Ukraine, albeit so far only by increments.

Tiếp tục đọc “Russia’s Brutality in Ukraine Has Roots in Earlier Conflicts”

Airline apologizes for tweet poking fun at Thailand’s King

An April Fool’s tweet referenced the apparently volatile relationship between King Vajiralongkorn and his consort Sineenat Wongvajirapakdi.

By Sebastian Strangio

thediplomat – April 04, 2022

Airline Apologizes for Tweet Poking Fun at Thailand’s King
A VietJet Air Airbus A320(SL) departs from Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on September 18, 2017.Credit: Flickr/Alec Wilson

The low-cost carrier Thai VietJet Air has been forced to make a public apology after an April Fool’s tweet prompted a flood of criticism in Thailand, one of its major markets, for making fun of Thailand’s King Vajiralongkorn. The post described the creation of a fake new route between the city of Nan in northern Thailand and Munich, Germany, where the king has for many years spent considerable amounts of time.

Tiếp tục đọc “Airline apologizes for tweet poking fun at Thailand’s King”

The Ukraine Crisis Threatens a Sustainable Food Future

WRI.org

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has already driven millions of people from their homes and left many without water, power and food. As hostilities continue, the humanitarian and economic consequences will expand far beyond the region, putting potentially millions of people around the world at risk of hunger.  

And these aren’t just short-term threats. The decisions that farmers and policymakers make over the next few weeks and months will have long-term consequences for the future of the world’s food systems. The right responses can keep the world on track for a sustainable food future. The wrong ones will worsen food insecurity and fuel climate change.

Ukrainian refugees at the Poland border.
Ukrainian refugees escape to the border town of Medyka, Poland. Millions of Ukrainian residents have fled their homes in recent weeks, due to the Russian invasion. Photo by Damian Pankowiec/Shutterstock

Emerging Food Implications of the Ukraine Crisis

Tiếp tục đọc “The Ukraine Crisis Threatens a Sustainable Food Future”

Horror at ‘mass killings’ in Ukraine as men slaughtered with bodies littering streets

CNN

As Russian forces withdraw from the areas around the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv, some of the horrors of what they have done are being revealed with bodies being discovered littering the streets of towns

A Ukrainian soldier walks past the body of a civilian, who according to residents was killed by Russian army soldiers, as it lies on the street, amid Russia's invasion of Ukraine, in Bucha

A Ukrainian soldier walks past the body of a civilian, who according to residents was killed by Russian army soldiers, as it lies on the street in Bucha (Image: REUTERS)

Tiếp tục đọc “Horror at ‘mass killings’ in Ukraine as men slaughtered with bodies littering streets”

Is it time to call Putin’s war in Ukraine genocide?

In international law, genocide has nothing explicitly to do with the enormity of criminal acts but, rather, of criminal intent.

By Philip Gourevitch

newyorker – March 13, 2022

People gather around two graves covered in flowers and two large crosses.
The larger reality is that the world has never before been confronted by a genocidal war waged by a man brandishing nuclear weapons.P hotograph by Dan Kitwood / Getty

“We have to call this what it is,” Volodymyr Zelensky said, late last month, a few days after Vladimir Putin had ordered the invasion and conquest of Ukraine. “Russia’s criminal actions against Ukraine show signs of genocide.” President Zelensky, who lost family members during the Holocaust, and who also happens to have a law degree, sounded suitably cautious about invoking genocide, and he called for the International Criminal Court in The Hague to send war-crimes investigators as a first step. But such investigations take years, and rarely result in convictions. (Since the I.C.C. was established in 1998, it has indicted only Africans; and Russia, like the United States, refuses its jurisdiction.) The only court that Zelensky can make his case in for now is the court of global public opinion, where his instincts, drawing on deep wells of courage and conviction, have been unerring. And by the end of the invasion’s second week—with Putin’s indiscriminate bombardment of civilian targets intensifying, and the death toll mounting rapidly; with more than two and a half million Ukrainians having fled the country, and millions more under relentless attack in besieged cities and towns; and with no end in sight—Zelensky no longer deferred to outside experts to describe what Ukrainians face in the most absolute terms. “I will appeal directly to the nations of the world if the leaders of the world do not make every effort to stop this war,” he said in a video message on Tuesday. He paused, and looking directly into the camera, added, “This genocide.”

Tiếp tục đọc “Is it time to call Putin’s war in Ukraine genocide?”

International law: Crimes against humanity – Luật quốc tế: Hình tội chống loài người

Crimes Against Humanity

Definition

Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

Article 7

Crimes Against Humanity

  1. For the purpose of this Statute, ‘crime against humanity’ means any of the following acts when committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population, with knowledge of the attack:
    1. Murder;
    2. Extermination;
    3. Enslavement;
    4. Deportation or forcible transfer of population;
    5. Imprisonment or other severe deprivation of physical liberty in violation of fundamental rules of international law;
    6. Torture;
    7. Rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, enforced sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity;
    8. Persecution against any identifiable group or collectivity on political, racial, national, ethnic, cultural, religious, gender as defined in paragraph 3, or other grounds that are universally recognized as impermissible under international law, in connection with any act referred to in this paragraph or any crime within the jurisdiction of the Court;
    9. Enforced disappearance of persons;
    10. The crime of apartheid;
    11. Other inhumane acts of a similar character intentionally causing great suffering, or serious injury to body or to mental or physical health.
  2. For the purpose of paragraph 1:
    1. ‘Attack directed against any civilian population’ means a course of conduct involving the multiple commission of acts referred to in paragraph 1 against any civilian population, pursuant to or in furtherance of a State or organizational policy to commit such attack;

Nguồn Crimes Against Humanity>>

Hình tội chống loài người

Định nghĩa

Đạo luật Rome về Tòa án Hình sự Quốc tế

Điều 7 

Hình tội chống loài người

  1. Cho mục đích của Đạo luật Rome về Tòa án Hình sự Quốc tế, “tội chống loài người” nghĩa là bất kỳ hành vi nào sau đây khi được thực hiện như một phần của cuộc tấn công trên diện rộng hoặc tấn công có hệ thống, với ý thức về cuộc tấn công, nhằm vào bất kỳ nhóm dân thường nào: 
    1. Giết người;
    2. Tiêu diệt;
    3. Nô lệ hóa;
    4. Trục xuất hoặc cưỡng chế chuyển nhóm dân;
    5. Bỏ tù hoặc tước nghiêm trọng  quyền tự do thể chất vi phạm các quy tắc cơ bản của luật quốc tế;
    6. Tra tấn;
    7. Hiếp dâm, nô lệ tình dục, cưỡng bức mại dâm, cưỡng bức mang thai, cưỡng bức triệt sản, hoặc bất kỳ hình thức bạo lực tình dục nào khác có mức nghiêm trọng tương đương;
    8. Bách hại bất kỳ nhóm nào hoặc tập thể nào có thể nhận dạng về chính trị, chủng tộc, quốc gia, dân tộc, văn hóa, tôn giáo, giới tính như được định nghĩa trong đoạn 3, hoặc với các lý do khác được  công nhận trên thế giới là bị cấm theo luật quốc tế, trong khi thực hiện bất kỳ hành vi nào được nêu trong đoạn này hoặc bất kỳ hình tội  nào thuộc thẩm quyền của Tòa án này;
    9. Cưỡng chế mất tích người;
    10. Tội phân biệt chủng tộc;
    11. Các hành vi tương tự vô nhân đạo khác  cố ý gây ra đau đớn lớn, hoặc làm tổn thương nghiêm trọng đến cơ thể hoặc sức khỏe tinh thần hoặc thể chất.
  2. Cho mục đích của đoạn 1:
    1. ‘Tấn công nhằm vào bất kỳ nhóm dân thường nào’ nghĩa là một quá trình ứng xử  thực hiện nhiều  hành động  được đề cập trong đoạn 1 chống lại bất kỳ nhóm dân thường nào,  thể theo hoặc đẩy mạnh chính sách của Nhà nước hoặc của một tổ chức nhằm thực hiện cuộc tấn công đó;
(Phạm Thu Hương dịch)



 mmmmmmmmmm

Chuỗi bài:

International law : Crime of Genocide — Luật quốc tế: Hình tội diệt chủng

Genocide was first recognised as a crime under international law in 1946 by the United Nations General Assembly (A/RES/96-I). It was codified as an independent crime in the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (the Genocide Convention). The Convention has been ratified by 149 States (as of January 2018). The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has repeatedly stated that the Convention embodies principles that are part of general customary international law. This means that whether or not States have ratified the Genocide Convention, they are all bound as a matter of law by the principle that genocide is a crime prohibited under international law. The ICJ has also stated that the prohibition of genocide is a peremptory norm of international law (or ius cogens) and consequently, no derogation from it is allowed.

The definition of the crime of genocide as contained in Article II of the Genocide Convention was the result of a negotiating process and reflects the compromise reached among United Nations Member States in 1948 at the time of drafting the Convention. Genocide is defined in the same terms as in the Genocide Convention in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Article 6), as well as in the statutes of other international and hybrid jurisdictions. Many States have also criminalized genocide in their domestic law; others have yet to do so. 

(Note: The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is the law that established the  ICC)

Definition

Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide


(Rome Statue of International Court, Part II, Art. 6)



Article II

In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

  • Killing members of the group;
  • Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
  • Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
  • Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
  • Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.
Elements of the crime

The Genocide Convention establishes in Article I that the crime of genocide may take place in the context of an armed conflict, international or non-international, but also in the context of a peaceful situation. The latter is less common but still possible. The same article establishes the obligation of the contracting parties to prevent and to punish the crime of genocide.

The popular understanding of what constitutes genocide tends to be broader than the content of the norm under international law. Article II of the Genocide Convention contains a narrow definition of the crime of genocide, which includes two main elements:

A mental element: the “intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such”; and

A physical element, which includes the following five acts, enumerated exhaustively:
  • Killing members of the group;
  • Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
  • Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
  • Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
  • Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

The intent is the most difficult element to determine. To constitute genocide, there must be a proven intent on the part of perpetrators to physically destroy a national, ethnical, racial or religious group. Cultural destruction does not suffice, nor does an intention to simply disperse a group. It is this special intent, or dolus specialis, that makes the crime of genocide so unique. In addition, case law has associated intent with the existence of a State or organizational plan or policy, even if the definition of genocide in international law does not include that element.

Importantly, the victims of genocide are deliberately targeted – not randomly – because of their real or perceived membership of one of the four groups protected under the Convention (which excludes political groups, for example). This means that the target of destruction must be the group, as such, and not its members as individuals. Genocide can also be committed against only a part of the group, as long as that part is identifiable (including within a geographically limited area) and “substantial.”

Nguồn Genocide >>

Diệt chủng được Đại hội đồng Liên hợp quốc công nhận lần đầu tiên là hình tội theo luật quốc tế vào năm 1946 (A/RES/96-I). Diệt chủng được đưa vào hệ thống luật như hình tội độc lập trong Công ước Ngăn ngừa và Trừng phạt Tội Diệt chủng (Công ước Diệt chủng) năm 1948. Công ước được 149 Quốc gia phê chuẩn (tính đến tháng 1 năm 2018). Tòa Công lý Quốc tế (ICJ) đã nhiều lần tuyên bố Công ước là hiện thân của các nguyên tắc đã là một phần của luật tục quốc tế chung. Điều này nghĩa là dù các Quốc gia có phê chuẩn Công ước Diệt chủng hay không, thì tất cả các Quốc gia đều bị ràng buộc về mặt pháp lý bởi nguyên tắc diệt chủng là hình tội bị cấm theo luật quốc tế truyền thống. Tòa Công lý Quốc tế cũng tuyên bố cấm diệt chủng là quy tắc bắt buộc của luật pháp quốc tế (gọi là jus cogens) và do đó, không được phép làm yếu tội diệt chủng.

Định nghĩa tội diệt chủng được nêu trong Điều II của Công ước Diệt chủng là kết quả của quá trình thương lượng và phản ánh sự thỏa hiệp đã đạt được giữa các Quốc gia Thành viên Liên hợp quốc vào năm 1948 tại thời điểm soạn thảo Công ước. Diệt chủng cũng được định nghĩa trong Đạo luật Rome về Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế (ở Điều 6) với từ ngữ tương tự như định nghĩa trong Công ước Diệt chủng, cũng như trong các đạo luật của các thẩm quyền quốc tế và thẩm quyền hỗn hợp khác. Nhiều Quốc gia cũng hình sự hóa diệt chủng trong luật trong nước của họ; một số Quốc gia khác thì chưa làm như vậy.

(Chú thích: Đạo luật Rome về Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế (ICC) là đạo luật thiết lập Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế)

Định nghĩa

Công ước về Ngăn ngừa và Trừng phạt Tội diệt chủng

(Đạo luật Rome về Tòa Hình sự Quốc Tế, Phần II, Điều 6)

Điều II

Trong Công ước này, diệt chủng nghĩa là bất kỳ hành vi nào sau đây được thực hiện với chủ ý tiêu diệt, toàn bộ hoặc một phần, của một nhóm quốc gia, dân tộc, chủng tộc hoặc tôn giáo, như:
  • Giết các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Gây hại nghiêm trọng về thể xác hoặc tinh thần cho các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Cố ý gây ra cho nhóm các điều kiện sống được tính toán để dẫn đến hủy diệt toàn bộ hoặc một phần thể chất của nhóm;
  • Áp đặt các biện pháp có chủ ý ngăn cản sinh đẻ trong nhóm;
  • Ép chuyển trẻ em thuộc nhóm này sang nhóm khác.
Các yếu tố cấu thành tội diệt chủng

Công ước Diệt chủng quy định tại Điều I rằng tội diệt chủng có thể diễn ra trong bối cảnh xung đột vũ trang, ở trong nước hoặc ở các nước với nhau, nhưng cũng có thể diễn ra trong bối cảnh hòa bình. Bối cảnh hòa bình ít phổ biến hơn nhưng vẫn có thể xảy ra. Điều I này cũng thiết lập nghĩa vụ ngăn ngừa và trừng phạt tội diệt chủng của các nước ký Công ước.

Cách hiểu phổ thông về những gì cấu thành tội diệt chủng có khuynh hướng rộng hơn điều khoản luật theo luật quốc tế. Điều II của Công ước Diệt chủng có định nghĩa tội diệt chủng hẹp hơn, gồm hai yếu tố chính:

Yếu tố ý định: “chủ ý tiêu diệt, toàn bộ hoặc một phần, của một nhóm quốc gia, dân tộc, chủng tộc hoặc tôn giáo”; và

Yếu tố thể chất, gồm 5 hành vi sau đây, được liệt kê đầy đủ:
  • Giết các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Gây hại nghiêm trọng về thể xác hoặc tinh thần cho các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Cố ý gây ra cho nhóm các điều kiện sống được tính toán để dẫn đến hủy diệt toàn bộ hoặc một phần thể chất của nhóm;
  • Áp đặt các biện pháp có chủ ý ngăn cản sinh đẻ trong nhóm;
  • Ép chuyển trẻ em thuộc nhóm này sang nhóm khác.

Chủ ý là yếu tố khó xác định nhất. Để cấu thành tội diệt chủng, phải chứng minh người thủ phạm có chủ ý tiêu diệt thân thể một nhóm quốc gia, dân tộc, chủng tộc hoặc tôn giáo. Hủy diệt văn hóa thì không đủ để cấu thành tội diệt chủng. Chủ ý chỉ phân tán nhóm (không cho nhóm sống tập trung với nhau) cũng không đủ để  cấu thành tội diệt chủng.  Đây là  chủ ý đặc biệt, tiếng Latinh là dolus specialis,  và chủ ý đặc biệt này làm cho tội diệt chủng trở thành khác thường. Thêm vào đó, án lệ thường xem những kế hoạch  hoặc chính sách diệt chủng của Nhà nước hoặc của một tổ chức là bằng chứng chủ ý diệt chủng, dù rằng  định nghĩa diệt chủng trong luật quốc tế không nói đến kế hoạch và chính sách.

Điều quan trọng là, các nạn nhân diệt chủng bị cố ý nhắm vào – không phải là vô tình  – vì họ là thành viên thực sự hay bị hiểu nhầm là thành viên  của một trong bốn nhóm được bảo vệ theo Công ước (các nhóm khác, ví dụ nhóm chính trị, thì không được bảo vệ).  Điều này có nghĩa là mục tiêu bị hủy diệt phải là một nhóm, chứ không phải là các thành viên với tư cách cá nhân. Diệt chủng cũng có thể nhắm vào chỉ một phần của nhóm, không hẳn là toàn bộ nhóm, miễn là phần đó có thể nhận dạng (kể cả phần đó nằm trong khu vực địa lý giới hạn) và diệt chủng “với số lượng người đáng kể”, không phải là làm hại vài người lẻ tẻ.

(Phạm Thu Hương dịch và chú thích)

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Chuỗi bài:

The Struggle for Myanmar – Podcast

Is Myanmar heading into civil war — or already there?

Nikkei – Nikkei staff writers – February 5, 2022 09:29 JST

NEW YORK — Welcome to Nikkei Asia’s podcast: Asia Stream.

Every week, Asia Stream tracks and analyzes the Indo-Pacific with a mix of interviews and reporting by our correspondents from across the globe.

New episodes are recorded weekly and available on Apple PodcastsSpotify and all other major platforms, and on our YouTube channel

LISTEN HERE

Tiếp tục đọc “The Struggle for Myanmar – Podcast”

The revolt against liberalism: what’s driving Poland and Hungary’s nativist turn? – podcast

For the hardline conservatives ruling Poland and Hungary, the transition from communism to liberal democracy was a mirage. They fervently believe a more decisive break with the past is needed to achieve national liberation. By Nicholas Mulder

theguardian

Written by Nicholas Mulder, read by Tanya Cubric and produced by Esther Opoku-Gyeni

Hungary’s prime minister Viktor Orbán at an electoral rally in April 2018.
Hungary’s prime minister Viktor Orbán at an electoral rally in April 2018. Photograph: Zsolt Szigetvary/EPA

Sat 21 Aug 2021 12.00 BST – Last modified on Mon 23 Aug 2021 09.19 BST

Listen here

  • Read the text version here

Tiếp tục đọc “The revolt against liberalism: what’s driving Poland and Hungary’s nativist turn? – podcast”