World Bank – New research on development issues in Vietnam – Volume 9, number 23 (2017 December 6)

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Table of Content

Agriculture and Rural development

• Chapter 10 – How Agricultural Research for Development Can Make a Change: Assessing Livelihood Impacts in the Northwest Highlands of Vietnam. Continue reading “World Bank – New research on development issues in Vietnam – Volume 9, number 23 (2017 December 6)”

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How to Build a Successful Team

By Adam Bryant @AdamBBryant, New York Time

Building a successful team is about more than finding a group of people with the right mix of professional skills. Over the course of interviewing over 500 leaders for Corner Office, I asked them all about the art of fostering a strong sense of teamwork. Their insights can help you lay the groundwork for a highly productive team that can communicate, cooperate and innovate in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect.

Make a Plan

You need a clear and measurable goal for what you want to accomplish.

 “If you have more than three priorities, you don’t have any.”

Jim Collins, author of the best-selling management books “Good to Great” and “Built to Last.” Continue reading “How to Build a Successful Team”

Ocean plastic pollution – what role can social science play?

29 November 2017

IDS is partnering with the EU, UN, Chatham House and other organisations to host a high level side event on circular economy solutions to tackling ocean plastic pollution, during this year’s United Nations Environment Assembly in Nairobi (4-6 December). The event will showcase specific examples of collaborative action and policies that aim to reduce plastic waste, address unsustainable consumption and production patterns and redirect investment for a clean, efficient and circular economy. Ahead of the event, I want to highlight the importance of a universal development approach and transformative social science research, as solutions to the ocean plastics problem.

A large sculpture of a shark made out of plastic waste found in the ocean.

Ocean plastics pollution – not just an environmental issue

Plastics pollution of oceans has emerged as a major global environmental crisis. Between 4.8 and 12.7 million tonnes of plastics enter the ocean each year. It is devastating for marine ecosystems and the accumulation of microplastics in food chains pose a risk to human health. And the issue is becoming more serious.  By 2050, plastics production is expected to increase to over 2000 tonnes per year, up from 311 million tonnes in 2014.

Plastics end up in the ocean as the result of chains of human activities in different parts of the world. We are all contributing to it. China, Indonesia and the Philippines have been identified as the top three sources of ocean plastics pollution by the Ocean Conservancy. While litter found on the sea floor around the UK has risen 150% in the last year and UK plastic waste drifts to the artic where is has a very damaging impact on one of the most vulnerable ecosystems in the world.

Continue reading “Ocean plastic pollution – what role can social science play?”

Conserving Forests Could Cut Carbon Emissions As Much As Getting Rid of Every Car on Earth

Globalforestwatch.org

By Susan MinnemeyerNancy Harris and Octavia Payne

Cantonal Hojancha was once a major cattle ranching region. Most of this area was cleared for pasture only 30 years ago. Now, many of the residents have moved into the service industry, and the pasture land has slowly converted back to forest. Photo by Aaron Minnick (World Resources Institute)

New analysis from The Nature Conservancy, WRI and others estimates that stopping deforestation, restoring forests and improving forestry practices could cost-effectively remove 7 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide annually, or as much as eliminating 1.5 billion cars—more than all of the cars in the world today!

In fact, forests are key to at least six of the study’s 20 “natural climate solutions,” which could collectively reduce 11.3 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions per year. That’s as much as halting global oil consumption, and would get us one-third of the way toward limiting global warming to 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F) above pre-industrial levels — the threshold for avoiding catastrophic effects of climate change — by 2030.

Stopping Deforestation Offers the Biggest Benefit

Continue reading “Conserving Forests Could Cut Carbon Emissions As Much As Getting Rid of Every Car on Earth”