US, Japan naval vessels visit Vietnam’s Cam Ranh Port for PP17

TUOI TRE NEWS

Updated : 05/21/2017 11:07 GMT + 7

Japan’s JS Izumo 183 is docked at Cam Ranh Port in Khanh Hoa Province, south-central Vietnam.

One vessel of the U.S. navy and two ships of the Japanese self-defense forces arrived at Cam Ranh Port in south-central Vietnam on Saturday afternoon for activities to accelerate cooperation in the region.

The visit is part of the Pacific Partnership 2017 (PP17), a U.S. Navy-initiated mission to enhance regional coordination in areas such as medical readiness and preparedness for man-made and natural disasters.

The U.S. Navy’s expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Fall River (T-EPF-4) and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s helicopter destroyer JS Izumo 183 and Takanami-class destroyer JS Sazanami 113 arrived at Cam Ranh for a training agenda revolving around humanitarian and medical aid.

According to Captain Stanfield Chien, PP17 mission commander, this year’s mission in Khanh Hoa Province would include seminars on civil construction projects, professional discussions and disaster response drills.

There would also be coordination in coastal health and marine search and rescue missions.

Naval forces of the three countries will preside over the completion of Hoa Mi and Son Ca kindergartens in Khanh Hoa, and the U.S. Seventh Fleet Band will be performing at local parks and a secondary school as part of the agenda.

The USNS Fall River belongs to the U.S. Military Sealift Command, measuring 103 meters in length with a beam of 28.5 meters and a draft of 3.83 meters.

The ship can reach a maximum speed of 43 nautical miles per hour and is capable of accommodating 312 crew members.

Ba tàu hải quân Mỹ và Nhật Bản đến Cam Ranh

The USNS Fall River is docked at Cam Ranh Port in Khanh Hoa Province, south-central Vietnam. Photo: Tuoi Tre

Ba tàu hải quân Mỹ và Nhật Bản đến Cam Ranh

The USNS Fall River is docked at Cam Ranh Port in Khanh Hoa Province, south-central Vietnam. Photo: Tuoi Tre

Ba tàu hải quân Mỹ và Nhật Bản đến Cam Ranh

The USNS Fall River is docked at Cam Ranh Port in Khanh Hoa Province, south-central Vietnam. Photo: Tuoi Tre

The JS Izumo (DDH-183) is a helicopter destroyer and the lead ship in the Izumo class of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force.

The US$1.2 billion ship was launched in 2013 and commissioned in 2015, measuring 282 meters long and 38 meters wide with a loaded displacement of 27,500 metric tons.

The ship can reach 30 nautical miles per hour and is armed with three Phalanx CIWS and two SeaRAM CIWS weapon systems.

The JS Izumo 183 can carry up to 28 aircraft with space for nine helicopters on its deck at any given time, and is capable of conducting anti-submarine as well as humanitarian missions.

Meanwhile, the JS Sazanami (DD-113) measures 151 meters long, 17.4 meters wide and 10.9 meters high, with a draft of 5.3 meters.

The vessel has a standard displacement of 4,650 metric tons and 6,300 when fully loaded, and can carry 175 troops.

The Pacific Partnership 2017 ships had departed the central city of Da Nang on Thursday after completing ten days of disaster response training, medical and engineering expertise exchanges, cooperative health engagements, and community relations events.

Ba tàu hải quân Mỹ và Nhật Bản đến Cam Ranh

Japan’s JS Izumo 183 (R) and JS Sazanami 113 are docked at Cam Ranh Port in Khanh Hoa Province, south-central Vietnam. Photo: Tuoi Tre

Ba tàu hải quân Mỹ và Nhật Bản đến Cam Ranh

Japan’s JS Sazanami 113 is docked at Cam Ranh Port in Khanh Hoa Province, south-central Vietnam. Photo: Tuoi Tre

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Biển Đông (SCS) and tagged , , by Trần Đình Hoành. Bookmark the permalink.

About Trần Đình Hoành

I am an attorney in the Washington DC area, with a Doctor of Law in the US, attended the master program at the National School of Administration of Việt Nam, and graduated from Sài Gòn University Law School. I aso studied philosophy at the School of Letters in Sài Gòn. I have worked as an anti-trust attorney for Federal Trade Commission and a litigator for a fortune-100 telecom company in Washington DC. I have taught law courses for legal professionals in Việt Nam and still counsel VN government agencies on legal matters. I have founded and managed businesses for me and my family, both law and non-law. I have published many articles on national newspapers and radio stations in Việt Nam. In 1989 I was one of the founding members of US-VN Trade Council, working to re-establish US-VN relationship. Since the early 90's, I have established and managed VNFORUM and VNBIZ forum on VN-related matters; these forums are the subject of a PhD thesis by Dr. Caroline Valverde at UC-Berkeley and her book Transnationalizing Viet Nam. I translate poetry and my translation of "A Request at Đồng Lộc Cemetery" is now engraved on a stone memorial at Đồng Lộc National Shrine in VN. I study and teach the Bible and Buddhism. In 2009 I founded and still manage dotchuoinon.com on positive thinking and two other blogs on Buddhism. In 2015 a group of friends and I founded website CVD - Conversations on Vietnam Development (cvdvn.net). I study the art of leadership with many friends who are religious, business and government leaders from many countries. In October 2011 Phu Nu Publishing House in Hanoi published my book "Positive Thinking to Change Your Life", in Vietnamese (TƯ DUY TÍCH CỰC Thay Đổi Cuộc Sống). In December 2013 Phu Nu Publishing House published my book "10 Core Values for Success". I practice Jiu Jitsu and Tai Chi for health, and play guitar as a hobby, usually accompanying my wife Trần Lê Túy Phượng, aka singer Linh Phượng.

Trả lời

Mời bạn điền thông tin vào ô dưới đây hoặc kích vào một biểu tượng để đăng nhập:

WordPress.com Logo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản WordPress.com Đăng xuất / Thay đổi )

Twitter picture

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Twitter Đăng xuất / Thay đổi )

Facebook photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Facebook Đăng xuất / Thay đổi )

Google+ photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Google+ Đăng xuất / Thay đổi )

Connecting to %s