Vietnamese businesses warned about ‘outsourcing trap’

Last update 14:00 | 07/02/2017
VietNamNet Bridge – More than 70 percent of Vietnam’s total export turnover belongs to foreign-invested enterprises (FIEs), while Vietnamese enterprises still cannot join the global value chain. 


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According to the General Statistics Office (GSO), Vietnam exported $175.9 billion worth of products in 2016, an increase of 8.6 percent over the year before. FIEs alone exported $126 billion, or 70 percent of total export turnover.

Vietnam’s exports have been witnessing stable two-digit growth rate over many years. In 2001, the country exported $15 billion worth of products, while the figure soared to $96.9 billion 10 years later. In 2016, export turnover climbed to $175.9 billion. Continue reading “Vietnamese businesses warned about ‘outsourcing trap’”

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Japanese warship visits Cam Ranh port

vietnam news

Update: April, 12/2017 – 10:33

Ship Fuyuzuki of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defence Force docked at Cam Ranh International Port in the south central province of Khánh Hòa yesterday, starting a five-day visit to Việt Nam. — VNA/VNS Photo

HÀ NỘI — Ship Fuyuzuki of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defence Force docked at Cam Ranh International Port in the south central province of Khánh Hòa yesterday, starting a five-day visit to Việt Nam.

The crewmember will visit leaders of the provincial People’s Committee, Commander of Naval Zone 4 and ships of the Vietnam People’s Navy. They will have sport exchange with officers and soldiers of Naval Zone 4.

The visit takes place in the context that relations between the two countries in general and defence ties in particular are growing. — VNS

Fury in Vietnam over United passenger dragged from plane

ChannelNewsAsia
Posted 12 Apr 2017 14:20

HANOI: Outrage spread to Vietnam on Wednesday over United Airlines’ handling of a passenger dragged from his seat after it emerged that the 69-year-old U.S. doctor was Vietnamese by birth.

Although United Airlines has no direct flights to Vietnam, there were widespread calls on social media for a boycott after video showed a bloodied David Dao being yanked out of the plane by airport security on Sunday to make way for United employees.

The ire in Vietnam grew quickly after it was reported that Dao’s origins were not in the Southeast Asian country’s old enemy, China, as many had at first assumed. Continue reading “Fury in Vietnam over United passenger dragged from plane”

Taiwan bans dog and cat meat from table as attitudes change

Consumption attracts large fine and repeat offenders could be named and shamed under law that is first of its kind in Asia

Cats are seen caged after being rescued by China Small Animal Protection Association from a Tianjin market that trade cats for meat and fur, in Beijing
People in Taiwan who repeatedly eat dog or cat meat face being named and shamed under the new law. Photograph: AP

Taiwan is set to become the first country in Asia to ban the consumption of dog and cat meat, as increasing pet ownership across the continent has seen attitudes shift.

The revised Animal Protection Act imposes a fine of up to 250,000 Taiwan dollars (£6,500) for eating dog or cat meat, while the penalties for animal cruelty or slaughter were raised to up to two years in prison and fines of up to 2m Taiwan dollars (£52,000). Continue reading “Taiwan bans dog and cat meat from table as attitudes change”

China’s Xi calls for peaceful resolution of N Korea tensions in call with Trump

BEIJING: Chinese President Xi Jinping called for a peaceful resolution of rising tension on the Korean peninsula in a telephone conversation with U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday, as a U.S. aircraft carrier strike group steamed towards the region.

Trump’s call with Xi, just days after they met in the United States, came as an influential state-run Chinese newspaper warned that the Korean peninsula was the closest it has been to a “military clash” since North Korea’s first nuclear test in 2006. Continue reading “China’s Xi calls for peaceful resolution of N Korea tensions in call with Trump”

Philippines: Army ‘kills Abu Sayyaf commander’ blamed for beheadings

Al Jazeera

Clash on Bohol leaves several fighters dead, notably Moammar Askali, blamed for the beheading of foreign hostages.

In 2000, Abu Sayyaf men snatched foreign tourists from a Malaysian resort, releasing them for millions of dollars in ransoms [File/AP]

Soldiers battling Abu Sayyaf in central Philippines are reported to have killed a key commander of the armed group who had been blamed for the beheadings of two Canadians and a German hostage.

Military chief of staff General Eduardo Ano said troops recovered and identified the remains of Moammar Askali, also known as Abu Rami, at the scene of the battle in a coastal village on Bohol island on Tuesday. Continue reading “Philippines: Army ‘kills Abu Sayyaf commander’ blamed for beheadings”

Canary in the coal mine Lacklustre power demand in Asia throws a cloud over coal

A surge in renewable energy is another threat to the black stuff’s future

economist_THE Hazelwood power station in Australia’s state of Victoria started generating electricity 52 years ago. The stark symbol of an era when coal was king, Hazelwood was one of Australia’s dirtiest: its fuel was the Latrobe valley’s brown coal, a bigger polluter than the black sort. The station was due finally to close on March 31st. Days earlier, chimney stacks were demolished at Munmorah, a black-coal station north of Sydney, already closed. Australia has shut ten coal-fired power stations over the past seven years, yet coal still generates about three-quarters of its electricity. Continue reading “Canary in the coal mine Lacklustre power demand in Asia throws a cloud over coal”