Dự án lấp biển Cần Giờ của VINGroup – Can Gio reclamation project by VINGroup (relevant articles)

PLEASE RAISE YOUR VOICE TO THE PRIME MINISTER TO SAVE CAN GIO

Viet reclamation project raises concern

Singapore, Strait Times, Dec. 23, 2019
Viet reclamation project raises concern, click here to read

Vietnam’s massive ecotourism charade

Ms Huynh Thi Phuong, a resident of Can Gio who collects clams for a living, has received no information about a massive coastal reclamation project that impact her family’s livelihood. Credit: Le Quynh

By LE QUYNH

March 9, 2020

A US$9.3-billion reclamation project adjacent to a critical biosphere reserve has experts shaking their heads and locals facing destitution. This is part 2 of a two-part report funded by Internews’ Earth Journalism Network on Ho Chi Minh City’s controversial 2,870-hectare Can Gio Tourist City project. (Part 1: Science be dammed: Vietnam’s rush to help its largest conglomerate build a tourist city)

Just south of Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC)’s dense urban sprawl lies Can Gio, its only coastal district. Blanketed by dense forest (46 percent) and water (32 percent), the district is renowned for its biosphere reserve – the “green lung” that protects HCMC against air and water pollution and shields its citizens from storms and natural disasters.

Low-lying HCMC ranks among the world’s top 10 cities most vulnerable to climate change largely due to rising sea levels. In 2011, the city began researching an action plan to prevent future natural disasters resulting from such threats. Local scientists joined with flood-management experts from Rotterdam and two years later revealed conclusive findings that left little room for doubt. Can Gio is HCMC’s bulwark against climate-change calamities and must be protected.

“From a climate adaptation perspective, the South of the city is not suitable for large scale urbanisation,” they wrote. “This area is under frequent impact of rising sea levels, and the low bulk density of the soil here makes it vulnerable to future erosions and collapses.”

They also warned that the Can Gio biosphere reserve, a UNESCO-listed site southeast of the city, was a crucial shield and should be spared from development. “This forest has a natural capacity to prevent coastal erosion and storm-induced coastal flooding,” they said.

The scientists’ findings were accepted by the HCMC People’s Committee in August 2014, and duly incorporated into city planning.

Then, barely two years later, came a remarkable U-turn.

In October 2016, the same People’s Committee decided to transform what at that time was an already extensive, 600-hectare ecotourism proposal on the reserve’s edge – into a vast 2,870-hectare city-scale venture on reclaimed land to house 230,000 people along with extensive infrastructure including a deep sea port.

In April 2017, the revised land-reclamation project was approved for inclusion in the 2030 masterplans for Can Gio and Ho Chi Minh by Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc.

Experts slammed the move as a 180-degree turn from the endorsed research findings and HCMC’s strategic objective of climate change adaptation. Also warning against urban development south of the city were multiple previous studies on HCMC climate adaptation conducted by international agencies such as the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

Earlier project promotional banner at the edge of the initial 600 hectare site for the Can Gio Tourist City, Can Gio, Vietnam. Credit: Le Quynh

In the path of climate change

The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the Can Gio Tourist City project evaluated just one climate change factor, rising sea levels, which Vu Hai, former secretary-general of the HCMC Water and Environment Association, says was flawed.

The project is to be sited on low-lying land. It will need to be raised with fill, but it is unclear, he says, to what extent the proposed height fully takes into consideration the ever increasing impacts of sea level rise being forecast for the Mekong Delta over the next 50-100 years.

Furthermore, Le Thi Xuan Lan, who conducts research on storms in the South China Sea, notes that violent storms in the area are on the rise in both frequency and intensity. The former Forecast Department deputy head at the Southern Meteorological and Hydrological Station says that in the past, storms were rare in the South, with an average likelihood of 20 percent per year. That has now risen to 60 to 80 percent. Recent records show at least one major storm per year now hits the district or scrapes its coast. Le predicts this trend will continue, with more frequent and stronger storms hitting Can Gio and HCMC.

“The location of the Can Gio estuary is shielded by the land of Ba Ria-Vung Tau and the island of Phu Quy, but it still suffers from serious damage whenever a storm passes by,” she observes. “If a storm hits HCMC and Can Gio directly, I’m afraid a city built on reclaimed land will not survive.”

Tidal waves also poses a threat, adds Le, and they too were unaddressed in the EIA. She notes that scientists at a conference in the United States 10 years ago warned that if a powerful earthquake struck the west coast of the Philippines, tidal sea waves arriving Vietnam would reach heights of about 8 metres in Da Nang, four metres in Nha Trang and 3 to 4 metres in Can Gio. Would a new city built entirely on reclaimed land be able to endure these massive waves, she asks.

Studies show that most districts of HCMC are at risk from natural disasters. ADB research warns that damage will be most severe in vulnerable rural districts like Can Gio, Nha Be and around the Dong Nai river mouth.

Meanwhile, Can Gio is now more vulnerable than ever, thanks to a separate megaproject off its coast. Plans for a 23-kilometre-long sea wall ostensibly to protect HCMC from flooding are going ahead despite opposition from scientists.

According to Prof Ho Long Phi, former director of the Centre for Water Management and Climate Change at HCMC National University, the Go Cong-Vung Tau sea dyke project together with the Can Gio Tourist City would pose serious risks of erosion, flooding and water stagnation, and will become a liability for the public in the long run.

Prof Ho predicts climate change impacts will be more severe than official projections. Even if carbon emissions are reduced in line with the Paris Accord, sea levels will rise by 2 to 3 metres within the next 150 to 200 years, he says.

Currently, Can Gio lies just above sea level, but its low-bulk density means that in 10 to 20 years it will have sunk several centimetres below sea level. By that time, the burden of protecting developments on reclaimed land will fall on the national budget rather than the project developer, he adds.

Architect Dr Ngo Viet Nam Son, warns that without an extensive system of drainage canals, the tourist city itself risks becoming a dyke that prevents the release of flood run-off from HCMC out to the sea.

Property development in guise of ecotourism 

Because of its proximity to the Can Gio Biosphere Reserve, the Gan Gio Tourist City project has been designated as an ecotourism development. “The design of the project has to reflect its role as a marine ecotourist hub, with a vision to create the best marine ecotourist city in Vietnam, taking into account such issues as wave stopping, sea water quality, and natural climate conditions,” states the project’s masterplan.

However the “eco” in ecotourism contradicts the essence of the project and disguises what some argue is just another property development. The Can Gio Tourist City plans to accommodate 230,000 residents over an area of almost 3,000 hectares of reclaimed land, more than three times the current population of Can Gio (70,000 residents spread over 70,4000 hectares). It also anticipates attracting 9 million tourists annually.

Project documents reveal that 58 percent of the project area will be covered by buildings and urban and transport infrastructure. Less than 17 percent is reserved for green space, and some 25 percent is to include an artificial lake. This hardly conforms with the natural ecology of the surrounding area says, architect Dr Son.

He says the Can Gio Tourist City should be re-designated as a property development, and the documents and decision-making should reflect this. HCMC city officials have a duty to ensure the project benefits are real, and not wrapped-up in artificial branding, he says. The truth, he fears, is that the development will not only causes harm to the environment and the local community, but become a public liability with incalculable expenses.

One of the obvious concern he says is the plan to construct an elevated road to run over the Can Gio biosphere reserve, which must be paid for by the city authority.

“This is an absurd demand,” says Dr Son. “Without this property development project, Can Gio would not need such an elevated road.”

Another worry is the vast scale of the project. Presently, new urban compounds throughout Vietnam remain vacant despite boasting comprehensive infrastructure. These “ghost towns” exist in Hanoi and Binh Duong and even close to downtown HCMC.

Dr Son warns that without careful plans to support livelihoods and everyday needs of residents, projects like this risk standing empty generating long-term harm to both investors and locals.

The 2,870-hectare Can Gio Tourist City land reclamation project includes over 13 kilometers of coastline in Long Hoa Commune and Can Thanh Township of Can Gio District, HCMC, Vietnam. As this promotional video illustrates, the true objective is property development not ecotourism.

Is such real estate speculation worth the risks?

Another question HCMC authorities must answer is why the this land-reclamation project has been chosen over sites to the east and northwest where strong regional connections already exists, and urbanisation is well underway.

A former official at the HCMC Climate Change Office, who asked to remain anonymous, says the Can Gio Tourist City plan is much more akin to a conventional city than a marine focussed ecocity. Any development in such a sensitive marine environment, the expert suggests, should incorporate floating buildings and infrastructure that preserve local ecosystems with high investment costs and low land-use percentages. In contrast, the Can Gio Tourist City is to be erected on reclaimed land that would seriously disrupt the local ecosystem, altering coastal currents and aggravating coastal erosion.

The expert suggests that the project should be postponed until it has been concluded that urban expansion in this area is not only necessary, but capable of overcoming the many identified shortcomings and risks.

The 15.5 hectares originally reclaimed for the Can Gio Tourist City project has been untouched for many years. Credit: Le Quan

Doan Manh Dung, secretary-general of the HCMC Marine Technology and Economics Association, questions the Can Gio Tourist City project’s economic viability.

He says the project appears to be modeling its fast-developing neighbour Vung Tau as well as other coastal tourist hubs around the country. But Can Gio’s natural attraction are its extensive mangroves, he argues, not white-sand beaches for swimming and sunbathing. If the HCMC authority wants to promote tourism in Can Gio, it first must demonstrate the market for mangrove-based ecotourism, then develop appropriately-scaled infrastructure to support it.

Instead, the Can Gio Tourist City plans to incorporate and maintain a large artificial beach.

Sweeping away the locals

Another priority, says Doan Manh Dung, should be to optimise value-added aquaculture to create sustainable livelihoods for the local community and make them less vulnerable to property speculation.

“We are dependent on the sea. I don’t know how we will live without it,” said Huynh Thi Phuong, voicing the fears of thousands of fellow-Can Gio residents who are living under the shadow of this vast land-reclamation project.

She knows little about the project, other than it will be implemented sometime in the near future. Her clam digging, together with her husband’s shoreline fishing earns the family about 9 million dong (US$388) per month, enough to keep their children in school.

Another local, Nguyen Van Thang, said the biggest downside of this planned land reclamation is that the resulting tourist city will be inaccessible to the poor. He worries that his fellow citizens will hardly benefit from the planned luxury homes, skyscraper, golf course and cruise ship port.

Mr. Nguyen Van Thang (left) and Mr. Nguyen Van Nam (right), both Can Gio locals, worry that reclaiming land for a tourist city project will hardly benefit the poor. Here, they hold a map showing Can Gio Tourist City project. Credit: Le Quan

The project is designed to span the entirety of the 13-kilometre coastline of Long Hoa Commune and Can Thanh Township in Can Gio District, yet there is no evidence to suggest that the land for aquaculture and small-scale tourism the locals currently rely on will remain accessible. These include 1,969 residents in 767 households engaged in clam farming and shoreline fishing, and 856 residents with boats for inshore fishing.

According to Le Minh Dung, chairman of the Can Gio People’s Committee, there is no specific plan yet to help local residents find alternative means of living when the tourist city project breaks ground.

It is assumed that locals will somehow integrate into the new economy, which the developer estimates will generate 2.9 trillion dong (US$1.25 billion) annually in national tax revenue – nearly 30 times the district’s current contribution — and represent upwards of 3 percent of HCMC’s retail and services receipts.

Technically, depriving access to marine resources locals previously depended on for their livelihood is against the law. An official at the Department for Basic Inspection of Seas and Islands, who prefers to remain anonymous, explained that authorities are legally required to establish coastal protection corridors prior to determining which areas should be conserved and which can be considered for development.

But according to a report submitted to Vietnam’s prime minister by the HCMC People’s Committee, the coastal protection corridor in Can Gio would become subordinate to the project and must, “respect the scale and avoid affecting the activities of the [Can Gio Tourist City] project”.

Environment double speak

In recent years, HCMC authorities have collaborated with many international institutions in seeking adaptation and mitigation measures for climate change, vowing to strive further toward sustainable development. Accordingly, the city has defined 10 priority areas for climate adaptation, namely urban planning, transportation, industry, water management, waste management, construction, health, agriculture and tourism.

“We will not trade our environment for economic growth” has been a mantra of Vietnam’s Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc for almost three years now. In keeping with this spirit, regions whose ecosystems services could help alleviate the impacts of climate change should be prioritised for national protection.

These natural resources are invaluable legacies for future generations as well. To date, Vietnam has established 31 national parks, 69 nature reserves and 45 protected landscape areas. UNESCO has also approved 9 world biosphere reserves in the country, including those with national parks or nature reserves in their core zones, which are protected by law. For the past decade, however, many of these areas have been impacted by a series of property development projects under the guise of “ecotourism.”

Experts rate the Can Gio mangrove forest as one of the best mangrove reforestations in Vietnam and the world. Credit: Le Quynh

This includes Vietnam’s highest peak Mount Fansipan and the surrounding Hoang Lien National Park, the national parks of Ba Vi and Phu Quoc, Ba Na and Son Tra Nature Reserves, and Cat Ba and Cu Lao Cham biosphere reserves. All these actions have sparked heavy public criticism. And a slew of similar projects now await final approval, including the Can Gio Tourist City, with the fate of the Can Gio Biosphere Reserve in the balance.

Last August, the Politburo approved a review on climate change adaptation, natural resources management and environmental protection which concluded that the over exploitation of many natural resources is aggravating the impacts of climate change in Vietnam. The review emphasised the urgent need to “establish comprehensive environmental criteria and technical standards, as well as improve the environmental impact assessment and approval process for economic development projects”.

The fate of the Can Gio Tourist City land-reclamation project now lies in the hands of Prime Minister Phuc. Will his final decision reflect this promise not to “trade our environment for economic growth?” Or will it leave his government’s proclaimed commitment to sustainability ringing hollow?

Science be dammed: Vietnam’s rush to help its largest conglomerate build a tourist city

Vietnam’s Can Gio Mangrove Biosphere Reserve is set to anchor a massive ecotourism city, but critics warn not only will the reserve be put at risk, but the project could exacerbate climate change risks to Ho Chi Minh City. Credit: Le Quynh.

By LE QUYNH

March 9, 2020

Up to 138 million cubic meters of sand could be removed from the already sand-depleted Mekong Delta to build a controversial reclamation project poised to transform a strip of Vietnam’s southern coast — despite strong opposition from experts. This is part 1 of a two-part report funded by Internews’ Earth Journalism Network on Ho Chi Minh City’s controversial 2,870-hectare Can Gio Tourist City project. (Part 2: Vietnam’s massive ecotourism charade)

An ambitious plan to erect a tourist city off Vietnam’s south coast has hit opposition from experts, who fear the development on reclaimed land will do irreparable harm to a critical biosphere reserve and the Mekong Delta while exacerbating climate change risks to Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC).

The Can Gio Land Reclamation Project on the southern fringes of HCMC set alarm bells ringing from the get-go 17 years ago. Experts warned that this ecotourism project could wreck the very resource it was encouraging people to come visit: HCMC’s “green lung” – the UNESCO-listed Can Gio Biosphere Reserve whose internationally renowned mangroves also shield Vietnam’s largest city from storms.

Initially planned for 600 hectares, the project exploded in size to 2,870 hectares under its new name, Can Gio Tourist City. The sprawling development plan now boasts luxury homes, hotels, convention centres and a golf course built around a port for cruise ships and crowned with a 108-storey skyscraper. Set for completion in 11 years, it aims to accommodate 230,000 residents and draw nearly nine million tourists annually, transforming the Can Gio coast and boosting the HCMC economy.

Vinhomes JSC, the real-estate arm of Vietnam’s biggest conglomerate, VinGroup, is the project’s developer. For several decades now, property development has been the fuel propelling VietGroup’s financial success.

But controversy has accompanied VinGroup’s rapid accumulation of wealth, as experts have chronicled environmental damage associated with many of its developments. With the Can Gio Tourist City land-reclamation project being its largest effort to date, valued at 217 trillion dong (US$9.34 billion), it is feared this worrying trend will continue.

Documents obtained by this journalist from various sources – including the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MONRE), the project owner and the HCMC People’s Committee – reveal potential harmful impacts far in excess of anything described in official public communications.

Meanwhile, the Vietnamese media classifies all information on the project as “sensitive”, helping to stifle public and scientific debate. A HCMC-based journalist from a major newsgroup, who asked not to be named, disclosed to peers her frustration when the text of an in-depth story she produced on the project was so severely edited–with key details about the project and its potential impacts removed–she could not recognize her own writing.

VinGroup declined to be interviewed for this story saying, “VinGroup has always tried to be discreet in any situation and has no intention to talk to the media about this project. We understand that the Can Gio Tourist City land-reclamation project is planned for an extremely sensitive location and we anticipated many difficulties but are determined to implement this project as best as we can.”

Interview requests made to MONRE, HCMC’s Department of Planning and Architecture and the Department of Natural Resources and Environment were similarly declined.

Sand extraction threatens Mekong Delta

Vinhomes JSC estimates reclamation work will require 138 million cubic metres of sand, enough to fill 36,600 Olympic-size swimming pools. Most will be taken from riverbeds in the Mekong Delta, where residents already face severe erosion from illegal and excessive sand extraction, a crisis being made all the more severe due to dams impounding the Mekong River upstream.

In 2018 the Mekong River Commission (MRC) projected that if 11 planned hydropower dam projects were added to six already operating in China, by 2040 only 3 percent of the river’s silt would reach Vietnam, effectively starving the delta of the these mineral deposits on which its ecology and society depends.

Nguyen Huu Thien, an independent expert on the Mekong Delta ecosystem, says the massive amount of sand required for the Can Gio Tourist City project would trigger a cascade effect.

“The Mekong is a homogeneous system. Taking sand from any single point will cause a shortage on the whole and create a ripple-effect to the delta, riverfront and oceanfront alike.”

A study by scientists Jean-Paul Bravard and Marc Goichot estimated that between 1998 and 2008, the delta’s Hau and Tien rivers lost 200 million tonnes of sand, increasing their depth by an average 1.3 metres.

If sand is mined from the Mekong River for Can Gio, says Nguyen Huu Thien, the river will deepen and its banks will collapse, taking with them homes and livelihoods of tens of thousands of people.

Exacerbating this growing erosion crisis poses threats to public infrastructure as well. Last August, authorities in An Giang province had asked Hanoi for 500 billion dong (US$21.5 million) to rebuild a portion of National Highway 91 that had collapsed into the Mekong River.

Shortage of sand for construction has also become a serious issue for Vietnam, particularly the South, with reserves depleted by unfettered illegal mining. This was the theme of an April 2019 conference titled “Discussion and Approval of the Plan for the Prevention of Illegal Sand Extraction in the Coast of Can Gio”.

Major General Phan Anh Minh, deputy director of the HCMC Public Security Department, warned delegates: “In their current state, sand reserves in the whole southern region can meet HCMC’s demands alone for no more than two years. Most construction projects, including those publicly funded and those prioritised for economic development and national security, are using illegally extracted sand.”

VinGroup has claimed impressive sand-extraction capacity, but the HCMC Department of Natural Resources states it has no data to corroborate this. Fears that VinGroup is exaggerating its capacity were heightened when authorities in Ben Tre province revealed its Binh Dai sand mine contained an estimated 400,000 square metres of sand – not the 4 million square meters reported by project owner.

Despite this critical issue of sand loss in the delta region, and the extensive amount of sand the project is expected to require, Can Gio Tourist City’s environmental impact assessment (EIA) failed to address sand at all.

Strong environmental risks, weak assessment

Experts are particularly concerned about the tourist city’s impact on the nearby Can Gio Biosphere Reserve.

The project site borders a buffer zone of the UNESCO-listed reserve, where more than 34,000 hectares of mangrove forest have cleansed the area of toxic Agent Orange sprayed by US forces during the Vietnam War.

Now, with pollution spiking in the HCMC metropolis, the mangrove forest serves as a green lung and a bulwark shielding the city from storms and extreme weather. Research has shown that the Can Gio mangroves also help filter greywater from upstream and regulate flood flows. Conserving the delicate balance of this ecosystem is vital not only to HCMC, but to the entire delta region.

Can Gio mangrove forest. Credit: Le Quynh

Prof Le Huy Ba, former director of the Institute for Environmental Science, Engineering and Management, is worried that dykes built to reclaim land for a project like Can Gio would wreak havoc on the highly sensitive mangrove forest by reducing its salinity. The mangroves will not survive even a 2 percent change in salinity, he warns.

The Can Gio Protection Forest Management Board echoed these concerns in a June 2018 communique: “Although the project site is not within the Can Gio protection forest, environmental pollution [especially water] emanating from the project would pose a threat to the generation and development of the mangrove forest’s flora and fauna, which are highly sensitive to a changing environment.”

Many of the 21 scientists attending a meeting organised by MONRE on October 12, 2018 criticised the EIA for not properly assessing impacts on the Can Gio Biosphere Reserve nor impacts on erosion and sedimentation processes around the project site and in nearby areas within Go Cong and Vung Tau. The EIA also failed to adequately address mitigation measures, they stated.

Minutes of the meeting show that key scientists including Tran Phong, Director of the Southern Environment Protection Department and Ngo Van Quy of the Biodiversity Conservation Department, opposed approving the EIA report.

Promotional Video: Can Gio marine ecotourism city

At a conference marking 40 years of the Can Gio Biosphere Reserve in 2018, HCMC Party Secretary Nguyen Thien Nhan demanded that more thorough research be conducted on reclamation work for the proposed tourist city. “If we make the wrong decision, its consequences may not be felt in five or 10 years, but later on the impact might be disastrous, and future generations will condemn us,” he cautioned.

Despite these and other objections, the EIA report was approved by Vo Tuan Nhan, deputy minister of Natural Resources and Environment, on January 28, 2019.

This environmental green light, however, came with an additional 15 requirements, including an order to continue EIA-related assessments into impacts on the Can Gio Biosphere Reserve, and on erosion, sedimentation and the hydrologic processes in nearby regions.

According to Dr Vu Ngoc Long, president of the Science Council of the Southern Institute of Ecology, failure to undertake such fundamental assessments effectively means MONRE must restart the EIA process and reconsider the feasibility of the entire project.

Indeed, many scientists say the Can Gio EIA fell well short of the most basic international EIA standards as so many important environmental questions were largely unaddressed. These additional requirements not only reinforce this view, they say, but illustrate how the EIA approval was rushed and lacked transparency.

Flawed decision-making

Nonetheless, with MONRE granting environmental clearance, the Ministry of Planning and Investment (MPI) on May 16, 2019, forwarded the Can Gio Tourist City project inspection report to the prime minister, recommending the report’s approval.

Since one of the 15 additional requirements associated with MONRE’s EIA approval states that the Prime Minister alone will grant final approval for the project, this effectively absolves MONRE of any future responsibility surrounding the project.

Many scientists voiced frustration that MONRE had done this. After all, as the public’s expert authority on environmental matters, the MONRE is compelled by law to determine the scientific legitimacy of an EIA report, and by extension any supplemental assessments that are now being required for the Can Gio Tourist City project.

MONRE should never have submitted the project to the Prime Minister says Dr Vu Ngoc Long of the Southern Institute of Ecology. “I certainly expected MONRE to act more responsibly and not approve such a flawed report,” he said.

Effectively, this approval was granted during what really was a pre-feasibility phase, since the EIA report offered only vague analysis of impacts and mitigation measures. For example, there was just patchy information on the potential damaging impact of the golf course, the entertainment centre, the cruise ship port and the rail link.

Furthermore, while Vietnam’s Environmental Protection Law requires full transparency and accountability from both project owners and government authorities, public information on the Can Gio Tourist City remains sparse and difficult to obtain. Civil society, the media and even some government agencies have been given very little information about the project and its potential impacts.

Such lack of environmental transparency has stymied social accountability and harmed the quality of many projects according to a study on community participation in EIA consultations by Ho Chi Minh City University of Economics. The alarmingly low level of public access to information on environmental issues is tantamount to “information blindness”, said the authors. Especially worrying stressed this report was the lack of participation by local communities who will bear the brunt of adverse impacts after “a perfunctory and superficial community consultation process that provides little meaningful information and low-quality consulting”.

Many expert feel that the scale of Can Gio project demands much greater public involvement, given that such an extensive land-reclamation project will have profound environmental impacts stretching northward to HCMC proper as well as the Mekong Delta.

Lấn biển Cần Giờ 2.870 ha: Chưa đánh giá hết tác động nhưng vẫn trình Thủ tướng phê duyệt

  10:37 | Thứ sáu, 30/08/2019 0

Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường Dự án khu đô thị lấn biển Cần Giờ 2.870 ha đã được Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường phê duyệt. Tuy nhiên, Bộ này đồng thời cũng đề nghị cần nghiên cứu tiếp các tác động dự án đến Khu dự trữ sinh quyển Cần Giờ, đến xói lở, bồi tụ và dòng chảy các khu vực xung quanh dự án.

LTS: Thường trực Ban Bí thư Trần Quốc Vượng vừa ký Kết luận của Bộ Chính trị về tiếp tục thực hiện Nghị quyết Trung ương 7 khóa XI về chủ động ứng phó với biến đổi khí hậu, tăng cường quản lý tài nguyên và bảo vệ môi trường. Nhìn nhận nhiều loại tài nguyên bị lạm dụng, khai thác cạn kiệt,… trong bối cảnh biến đổi khí hậu diễn biến nhanh hơn dự báo, gây hậu quả ngày càng lớn, một trong những nhiệm vụ cấp bách mà Kết luận của Bộ Chính trị yêu cầu là cần “quy định tiêu chí môi trường, quy chuẩn kỹ thuật về lựa chọn, quyết định đầu tư phát triển. Điều chỉnh cơ chế chấp thuận, quy trình, hình thức đánh giá tác động môi trường đối với các dự án phát triển kinh tế”.

Từ kết luận này, soi rọi vào Dự án Khu đô thị du lịch lấn biển Cần Giờ của TP.HCM, Người Đô Thị nhận thấy có rất nhiều vấn đề cần được làm sáng tỏ, cho dù dự án đã được Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường phê duyệt Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường.

Ra đời cách đây hơn 17 năm, dự án lấn biển Cần Giờ (TP.HCM) ngay từ đầu đã vấp phải nhiều phản đối của giới chuyên gia do nguy cơ tác động xấu tới Khu dự trữ sinh quyển Cần Giờ. Từ quy mô ban đầu là 821 ha, trong đó có 600 ha lấn biển (15,5 ha biển đã được san lấp bỏ hoang nhiều năm), hiện nay dự án đã được mở rộng thành 2.870 ha với tên mới là Khu đô thị du lịch biển Cần Giờ, do công ty cổ phần đô thị du lịch Cần Giờ (một công ty con trong chuỗi các công ty kinh doanh bất động sản của công ty cổ phần Vinhomes, thuộc tập đoàn Vingroup) làm chủ đầu tư.

Tại hội thảo khoa học “40 năm Cần Giờ (Duyên Hải), TP.HCM, thành quả và kinh nghiệm” – tháng 12.2018, Bí thư Thành ủy TP.HCM Nguyễn Thiện Nhân đã phát biểu cần nghiên cứu kỹ dự án lấn biển Cần Giờ, “Nếu chúng ta quyết định sai, 5-10 năm có thể chưa thấy gì, nhưng sau này có thể tàn phá khủng khiếp và con cháu sẽ lên án chúng ta”, ông Nhân nói.

Thế nhưng, giữa tháng 5.2019, Bộ Kế hoạch và Đầu tư đã ký trình Thủ tướng Chính phủ Báo cáo kết quả thẩm định điều chỉnh chủ trương đầu tư mở rộng Dự án Khu đô thị du lịch lấn biến Cần Giờ, kiến nghị Thủ tướng Chính phủ xem xét, quyết định chủ trương đầu tư.

Hàng loạt nguy cơ môi trường, chưa đánh giá hết tác động

Sau con đường Rừng Sác mở rộng xé đôi Khu dự trữ sinh quyển Cần Giờ gây nhiều tranh cãi, Dự án lấn biển Cần Giờ 2.870 ha, đang vấp phải nhiều phản đối của giới chuyên môn do lo ngại những nguy cơ tác động xấu tới Khu dự trữ sinh quyển rừng ngập mặn Cần Giờ.

GS. Lê Huy Bá, nguyên Viện trưởng viện Quản lý khoa học công nghệ và quản lý môi trường từng lo ngại, từ xưa đến nay độ mặn của khu vực rừng ngập mặn đã ổn định, việc xây bờ kè trong dự án dẫn luồng chảy sông ra xa thì độ mặn hoàn toàn có thể sẽ giảm xuống; và chỉ cần có sự thay đổi ở mức 2% độ mặn là rừng ngập mặn sẽ chết.

Văn bản Ban Quản lý Rừng phòng hộ Cần Giờ vào tháng 6.2018 ý kiến: “hệ sinh thái sinh ngập mặn Cần Giờ chịu ảnh hưởng trực tiếp từ môi trường nguồn nước của hệ thống sông rạch kết nối Biển Đông. Tuy khu vực dự án không nằm trong ranh giới Rừng phòng hộ Cần Giờ, nhưng việc ô nhiễm môi trường (đặc biệt là nguồn nước) phát sinh trong quá trình thực hiện dự án có khả năng gây ảnh hưởng đến sự sinh trưởng và phát triển của các hệ động – thực vật rừng ngập mặn Cần Giờ vốn có tính nhạy cảm rất cao với các tác nhân thay đổi môi trường”.

Vị trí Dự án Khu đô thị du lịch lấn biển Cần Giờ trên bản đồ


Còn ý kiến của Sở Giao thông Vận tải TP.HCM: “khu vực nghiên cứu nằm ở cửa biển có nhiều tuyến giao thông thủy, hàng hải quan trọng của TP.HCM và khu vực lân cận, đặc biệt công trình lấn biển có thể ảnh hưởng tới môi trường tự nhiên làm thay đổi dòng chảy”.

Trao đổi với Người Đô Thị về dự án, kỹ sư Vũ Hải, nguyên Phó Chủ tịch kiêm Tổng thư ký Hội Nước và Môi trường TP.HCM nhận định: vùng lấn biển và các cửa sông khác trong vùng hiện nay là vùng bồi lấp, nên khi lấn biển xây khu đô thị chắn ngang sẽ gây hiện tượng đưa phù sa tới các cửa sông/biển khác, khiến các cửa sông/biển này bị bồi lắng, nhất là sông Soài Rạp – Thị Vải, nguy cơ ảnh hưởng đến giao thông sông vận tải phía Nam là rất lớn.

Còn đánh giá tác động môi trường của việc lấn biển trong nghiên cứu tiền khả thi nhận định: “sự thay đổi địa hình bãi Cần Giờ làm vùng ngập triều mở rộng ra phía biển sẽ làm vùng bãi triều bị thu hẹp và độ ngập trên bãi tăng lên, thời gian ngập kéo dài cũng như thay đổi sự truyền sóng đến công trình và tốc độ dòng chảy – kéo theo sự bồi lắng hoặc xói mòn bãi biển. Việc xây dựng công trình sẽ làm cho dòng chảy, sóng gió tăng lên và dự báo một số khu vực có tốc độ xói tăng cao”…

Trong Hồ sơ tài liệu về Dự án khu đô thị lấn biển Cần Giờ mà chúng tôi đã tiếp cận được cho thấy, các văn bản quyết định, chỉ thị của Thành ủy TP.HCM, UBND TP.HCM đều tập trung vào yêu cầu cốt lõi: đảm bảo yêu cầu bảo tồn hệ sinh thái Khu dự trữ sinh quyển rừng ngập mặn Cần Giờ; không ảnh hưởng đến chế độ dòng chảy, sa bồi làm ảnh hưởng địa hình lòng sông, không gây xói lở ven bờ và không ảnh hưởng đến giao thông đường thủy nội địa, hàng hải qua khu vực này kết nối với các cảng thành phố.

Đồng thời yêu cầu cần làm rõ tác động của từng quy mô dự án có ảnh hưởng đến độ mặn của nước, trước hết là khu vực nước rừng sinh thái ngập mặn, hạn chế tối đa đến toàn bộ hệ sinh thái của khu vực này,…

Vội vàng phê duyệt Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường 

Tuy nhiên, Quyết định số 220/QĐ-BTNMT của Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường do Thứ trưởng Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường Võ Tuấn Nhân ký ngày 28.1.2019, phê duyệt nội dung Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường Dự án Khu đô thị du lịch biển Cần Giờ, quy mô 2.870 ha lại cho thấy: những yêu cầu cốt lõi trên vẫn chưa được đánh giá đầy đủ. Dù phê duyệt, nhưng Quyết định 220/QĐ-BTNMT còn “đính” thêm tới 15 điều kiện kèm theo, trong đó có nhiều điều kiện là “tiếp tục nghiên cứu đánh giá tác động”!

Điển hình nhất là điều kiện mục 3.1 của Quyết định: “tiếp tục nghiên cứu các giai đoạn tiếp theo tác động của việc thực hiện dự án đến Khu dự trữ sinh quyển rừng ngập mặn Cần Giờ, đến xói lở, bồi tụ và dòng chảy các khu vực xung quanh dự án và có biện pháp giảm thiểu thích đáng các tác động tiêu cực của dự án”.

TS. Vũ Ngọc Long, Chủ tịch Hội đồng khoa học Viện Sinh thái miền Nam đánh giá, điều kiện 3.1 này chứng tỏ chủ đầu tư đã chưa đánh giá được hết tác động của dự án tới Khu dự trự sinh quyển Cần Giờ, đến xói lở, bồi tụ và dòng chảy khu vực xung quanh dự án, cũng như chưa hề tìm được những giải pháp giảm thiểu thích đáng. Về mặt chuyên môn, đây là một trong những vấn đề lớn nhất mà đánh giá tác động môi trường cần phải thực hiện được.

Hay tại mục 3.6 của Quyết định phê duyệt: “trường hợp xảy ra sự cố, gây tác động lớn đến hệ sinh thái và môi trường phải dừng ngay các hoạt động của dự án để khắc phục, điều chỉnh biện pháp bảo vệ môi trường”, TS. Long cho rằng đây là một điều kiện “không thể chấp nhận được”.  Lý do, một Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường phải dự báo được những điều có thể xảy ra và không xảy ra, đồng thời, phải đưa ra được những giải pháp giảm thiểu tác động thích đáng.

Dự án Khu đô thị biển Cần Giờ 2.870 ha, trong đó sẽ lấn biển 2.718 ha; nằm trên toàn bộ bờ biển của xã Long Hòa và thị trấn Cần Thạnh, huyện Cần Giờ, TP.HCM; khoảng cách từ khu vực thực hiện dự án đến vùng lõi là 8,6 km, nằm kế cận vùng chuyển tiếp Khu dự trự sinh quyển Cần Giờ.

Tổng trữ lượng cát san lấp cần cho dự án là: 137,6 triệu m3. Quy mô dân số dự án là 228.000 người, với 8.887 triệu lượt khách du lịch/năm. Dự án có tổng vốn đầu tư 217.053,967 tỷ đồng (trong đó chủ đầu tư góp 15% tổng vốn đầu tư). Dự kiến dự án được thực hiện kéo dài 11 năm, kể từ ngày được cấp quyết định chủ trương đầu tư. Ảnh: Lê Quân


Phân tích với Người Đô Thị, một chuyên gia về đánh giá tác động môi trường với kinh nghiệm lâu năm trong quản lý môi trường cho biết: về bản chất, đánh giá tác động môi trường là đánh giá sự tác động qua lại, dự án sẽ có ảnh hưởng đến môi trường như thế nào, và ngược lại, môi trường sẽ ảnh hưởng đến dự án ra sao, chứ không phải chỉ đánh giá những ảnh hưởng một chiều. Có những vấn đề chưa từng xảy ra, nhà khoa học phải dùng kiến thức, kinh nghiệm để nhìn thấy trước được những ảnh hưởng, tác động đó; từ đó đưa ra được những biện pháp phòng ngừa, giảm thiểu tối đa, hoặc tránh không gây ảnh hưởng, xét ở mọi lĩnh vực góc độ, kể cả tính toán về hiệu quả kinh tế.

Trong trường hợp những giải pháp đưa ra vẫn không giải quyết được, thiếu khả thi thì dự án phải dừng lại, không được thông qua. Vì vậy, việc Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường Dự án Khu đô thị lấn biển Cần Giờ chưa đánh giá xong hết các tác động mà vẫn được Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường phê duyệt với điều kiện “cần tiếp tục đánh giá” là “ngược đời”.

Bình luận về những điều kiện kèm theo trong Quyết định 220/QĐ-BTNMT, nhiều nhà khoa học nhấn mạnh, đây là một Quyết định phê duyệt vội vàng, không thỏa đáng và còn nhiều vấn đề mập mờ, khi những vấn đề rất lớn về môi trường vẫn chưa giải quyết được thì lại bị biến thành điều kiện kèm theo, “cần tiếp tục nghiên cứu”. Những điều kiện kèm theo trong Quyết định này cũng cho thấy việc thành lập Hội đồng khoa học thẩm định Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường là vô nghĩa. Bởi ý nghĩa của việc thành lập Hội đồng là để xem xét Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường đã được đánh giá đầy đủ chưa, đồng thời đánh giá dự án này có thể triển khai được hay không.

Nhiều chuyên gia đã cho rằng, chỉ riêng điều kiện 3.1 nói trên đã đáng để Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường phải quyết định cho làm lại Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường, đánh giá lại toàn bộ tính khả thi của dự án.

Tìm hiểu của chúng tôi cũng cho thấy, tại cuộc họp Hội đồng thẩm định Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường do Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường lập vào ngày 12.10.2018, với 21 thành viên, đã có nhiều ý kiến thành viên trong hội đồng nhận xét: Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường dự án chưa thấy rõ và cần bổ sung những tác động của dự án đến Khu dự trữ sinh quyển Cần Giờ, cũng như tác động đến xói lở, bồi tụ khu vực dự án, kể cả khu vực Gò Công, Vũng Tàu. Những giải pháp giảm thiểu các tác động này cũng cần được cụ thể làm rõ.

Theo văn bản cuộc họp Hội đồng ngày 12.10.2018, ông Ngô Văn Quý, đại diện Cục Bảo tồn đa dạng sinh học đã không đồng ý thông qua Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường vì những lý do trên. Tương tự, ông Trần Phong, Cục Bảo vệ môi trường miền Nam cũng đã đề nghị chưa thông qua Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường dự án, không chỉ do những vấn đề trên mà còn do “các đánh giá tác động môi trường được nêu trong báo cáo là khá đơn giản, sơ sài, chưa thể hiện và gắn liền với các đặc thù của dự án. Vì vậy, các biện pháp giảm thiểu như đề xuất trong báo cáo cũng chưa đảm bảo hạn chế một cách triệt để các tác động ảnh hưởng đến môi trường tự nhiên, kinh tế xã hội của khu vực/vùng”.

Mặt dù sau đó, nội dung Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường đã được chỉnh sửa, bổ sung 2 lần theo công văn số 925 ngày 17.12.2018 và văn bản ngày 7.1.2019 của công ty Cổ phẩn đô thị du lịch Cần Giờ, chủ đầu tư dự án.

Quyết định mâu thuẫn

Theo ý kiến của Bộ Kế hoạch và Đầu tư vào năm 2017 về Dự án Khu đô thị lấn biển Cần Giờ mở rộng 2.870 ha, do tổng vốn đầu tư dự án Khu đô thị lấn biển Cần Giờ lớn hơn 5.000 tỷ đồng (217.053,967 tỷ đồng), và có hạng mục xây dựng và kinh doanh sân golf, nên theo quy định, thẩm quyền quyết định điều chỉnh chủ trương đầu tư dự án thuộc Thủ Tướng Chính phủ.

Ngày 23.3.2019, Phó Chủ tịch UBND TP.HCM Trần Vĩnh Tuyến đã ký văn bản số 1049/UBND-DA gửi Bộ Kế hoạch và Đầu tư để xem xét, thẩm định trình Thủ tướng Chính phủ quyết định chủ trương đầu tư dự án.

Theo quy định tại Điều 25 Luật Bảo vệ môi trường, Quyết định phê duyệt Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường của Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường là căn cứ để cấp có thẩm quyền (trong trường hợp này là Thủ tướng Chính phủ) quyết định chủ trương đầu tư dự án.

Đến ngày 16.5.2019, Bộ Kế hoạch và Đầu tư đã trình Thủ tướng Chính phủ Báo cáo kết quả thẩm định điều chỉnh chủ trương đầu tư mở rộng Dự án Khu đô thị du lịch lấn biến Cần Giờ, kiến nghị Thủ tướng Chính phủ xem xét, quyết định chủ trương đầu tư điều chỉnh Dự án Đầu tư mở rộng dự án Khu đô thị du lịch lấn biển Cần Giờ của Công ty cổ phần Đô thị Du lịch Cần Giờ.

Tuy nhiên, bên cạnh nhiều điều kiện kèm theo trong Quyết định phê duyệt Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường mà chúng tôi đã nêu trên, Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường cũng đồng thời đưa ra điều kiện (mục 3.2): “chỉ được tiến hành triển khai dự án khi được Thủ tướng Chính phủ chấp thuận chủ trương đầu tư”.

Bình luận về điều này, nhiều nhà khoa học cho rằng đây là một quyết định nhiều mâu thuẫn. Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường là cơ quan giúp việc, tham mưu cho Thủ tướng về chuyên môn. Thủ tướng chỉ đồng ý hay không về chủ trương, còn Bộ có trách nhiệm thẩm định Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường có đủ giá trị khoa học hay không, đặc biệt về nguyên tắc trong các vấn đề về môi trường. Trong trường hợp còn lưỡng lự, trong vai trò là một cơ quan quản lý Nhà nước, tham mưu cho Chính phủ thì Bộ không nên trình Thủ tướng xem xét.

Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường cần được thực hiện độc lập, thay vì giao chủ đầu tư

Thực tế cho thấy, lâu nay nhà đầu tư làm quy hoạch dự án, và nhà đầu tư đứng ra thuê làm Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường để hợp thức hóa quy hoạch; dựa trên đó, dự án được phê duyệt. Nhưng với một dự án quy mô khổng lồ, 2.870 ha, trong đó sẽ lấn biển 2.718 ha, có thời gian triển khai kéo dài tới 11 năm ở vùng biển thuộc khu vực nhạy cảm như Dự án Khu đô thị lấn biển Cần Giờ, thì việc đánh giá tác động môi trường cần thực sự chặt chẽ, thấu đáo, dù nó mang tính là công cụ dự báo.

Không chỉ kèm theo hàng loạt điều kiện quan trọng cần nghiên cứu tiếp, mà theo Quyết định phê duyệt dự án, Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường dự án được thực hiện trong giai đoạn nghiên cứu tiền khả thi; vì vậy, một số hạng mục, biện pháp bảo vệ môi trường chưa thật chi tiết, cụ thể, chưa đủ thông tin đánh giá tác động môi trường sân golf, các khu vui chơi, cảng tàu du lịch quốc tế, khu nhà ga và đường sắt đô thị,…

Trao đổi với Người Đô Thị, TSKH-KTS. Ngô Viết Nam Sơn nhận định, việc đánh giá không đầy đủ, hay hẹn lại đánh giá tiếp (như Quyết định phê duyệt Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường số 220/QĐ-BTNMT của Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường) là không đúng; làm rồi sửa rất khó và tốn kém vô cùng.

TSKH-KTS. Ngô Viết Nam Sơn cho rằng, với cơ chế đặc thù của TP.HCM hiện nay, thành phố nên chủ động thay đổi, không nên giao Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường cho chủ đầu tư thực hiện. Thay vào đó, nên áp dụng theo cách làm quốc tế: trong số các chi phí thủ tục để xin phê duyệt dự án, cần phải bao gồm khoản chi phí cần thiết đánh giá tác động môi trường – mà chủ đầu tư cần phải nộp cho thành phố.

Thành phố sẽ dùng kinh phí này để thuê một đơn vị chuyên nghiệp độc lập đánh giá tác động môi trường, tác động đến việc phát sinh cần thiết phải nâng cấp hạ tầng phục vụ cho dự án (bao gồm việc cải thiện giao thông, chống ngập, cấp điện nước,… và các xử lý tác động môi trường khác), làm cơ sở khoa học cho thành phố xem xét dự án có khả thi hay không. Sau đó là cần tính đến việc thương lượng về tỷ lệ trách nhiệm đóng góp của nhà đầu tư, như là một điều kiện được phê duyệt dự án – trong trường hợp dự án khả thi.

“Cơ chế” đánh giá tác động môi trường này, không chỉ áp dụng với Dự án Khu đô thị du lịch biển Cần Giờ mà hoàn toàn có thể áp dụng cho những dự án lớn của thành phố hiện nay.

Lê Quỳnh 

Lấn biển Cần Giờ 2.870ha: Chờ Thủ tướng quyết định

  11:01 | Thứ bảy, 30/03/2019 0

UBND TP.HCM vừa gửi văn bản cho Bộ Kế hoạch và Đầu tư, có ý kiến về các nội dung liên quan đến dự án “Đầu tư mở rộng dự án Khu đô thị du lịch lấn biển Cần Giờ” từ 600 ha lên 2.870ha, với tổng vốn đầu tư hơn 217.053 tỷ đồng, dự kiến triển khai trong 11 năm.

Theo nhà đầu tư, mở rộng quy mô dự án lên 2.870ha để đáp ứng mục tiêu xây dựng Cần Giờ trở thành khu đô thị du lịch biển tầm cỡ quốc tế theo chủ trương của TP.HCM và chính phủẢnh: Huy Phong


Cụ thể, tại văn bản số 1049/UBND-DA do Phó Chủ tịch UBND TP.HCM Trần Vĩnh Tuyến ký ngày 23.3.2019 có ý kiến về các nội dung liên quan đến dự án “Đầu tư mở rộng dự án Khu đô thị du lịch lấn biển Cần Giờ” của Công ty cổ phần Đô thị du lịch Cần Giờ, gửi Bộ Kế hoạch và Đầu tư để xem xét, thẩm định trình Thủ tướng Chính phủ quyết định chủ trương đầu tư dự án, UBND TP.HCM cho biết:

Khu vực lấn biển Cần Giờ 2.870ha theo đề xuất của nhà đầu tư, không có người dân sinh sống nhưng có các cơ sở kinh tế của người dân cần phải hỗ trợ, giải tỏa. Số người dân bị ảnh hưởng trực tiếp dự kiến khoảng 767 hộ (1.696 nhân khẩu) đang sản xuất nghêu, đánh bắt bộ (bắt ốc, kéo lưới tay…)

Ngày 7.9.2018, Công ty cổ phần Đô thị du lịch Cần Giờ nộp hồ sơ đề nghị quyết định chủ trương đầu tư dự án “Đầu tư mở rộng dự án Khu đô thị du lịch lấn biển Cần Giờ”, với quy mô từ 600 ha (đã được Thủ tướng Chính phủ thông qua báo cáo tiền khả thi năm 2004; TP.HCM cấp phép xây dựng năm 2007, đã san lấp 15,5ha) tăng lên 2.870 ha tại xã Long Hòa và thị trấn Cần Thạnh, với tổng vốn đầu tư 217.053,967 tỷ đồng. Thời gian hoạt động của dự án 50 năm kể từ ngày được cấp quyết định chấp thuận chủ trương đầu tư. Công trình dự kiến hoàn thành trong 11 năm, gồm 3 giai đoạn:

Giai đoạn 1 (từ 2019 – 2022), thực hiện: hạ tầng khung (đê bao, tuyến giao thông chính đô thị mặt cắt 50m, đường trục chính ra mũi Hải Đăng, đường liên khu vực và đường khu vực…); Biển hồ, khu công viên chuyên đề, khu cây xanh chuyên đề – thể dục thể thao; Khách sạn và khu hỗn hợp trung tâm; Khu công cộng dịch vụ đô thị; Khu hỗn hợp và tháp điểm nhấn cao 108 tầng; Khu nhà ở; Khu khách sạn – resort du lịch nghỉ dưỡng;…

Giai đoạn 2 (từ năm 2022 – 2027), thực hiện: hoàn thiện tiếp hạ tầng khung (đường nhánh, bến cảng, Monorail); Công viên công cộng, bệnh viện, cầu qua biển hồ; Khu nhà và khu khách sạn – resort du lịch nghỉ dưỡng; khu cao tầng hỗn hợp;…

Giai đoạn 3 (từ 2027 đến 2030) thực hiện: hạ tầng khung (bãi biển, các đường nhánh còn lại…); Nhóm nhà ở còn lại và khu khách sạn – resort du lịch nghỉ dưỡng;…

Dự án “Đầu tư mở rộng dự án Khu đô thị du lịch lấn biển Cần Giờ” được đề xuất tại xã Long Hòa và thị trấn Cần Thạnh, dự kiến triển khai trong 11 năm. Ảnh: Huy Phong 


Theo văn bản giải trình của nhà đầu tư, “qua quá trình triển khai nhận thấy tiềm năng to lớn của sự phát triển khu du lịch lấn biển Cần Giờ, nhằm phát triển thành một khu du lịch có tầm cỡ quốc tế, xứng đáng với sự phát triển kinh tế của TP.HCM, là đầu tàu kinh tế của cả nước, nên UBND TP.HCM đã chỉ đạo các sở ngành nghiên cứu điều chỉnh quy hoạch và mở rộng phát triển khu đô thị du lịch Cần Giờ. Đến năm 2015, phương án điều chỉnh mở rộng hoàn tất và phương án mở rộng chính thức được đề xuất trình UBND TP.HCM, và được thành phố chấp thuận nguyên tắc cho triển khai nghiên cứu.

Thực hiện chủ trương của thành phố và chính phủ nhằm xây dựng Cần Giờ trở thành khu đô thị du lịch biển tầm cỡ quốc tế, từ năm 2015 đến nay, UBND huyện Cần Giờ cùng với sự hỗ trợ của các bộ ngành đã tiến hành điều chỉnh quy hoạch và mở rộng quy mô dự án lên 2.870ha để đáp ứng mục tiêu trên…”.

Theo văn bản 1049/UBND-DA, về Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường, các bộ ngành từng có ý kiến dự án cần được cơ quan thẩm quyền quản lý môi trường thẩm định, phê duyệt Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường theo quy định, tránh làm ảnh hưởng tiêu cực đến môi trường khu vực, môi trường nước, hệ sinh thái rừng ngập mặn đã được UNESCO công nhận là Khu dự trữ sinh quyển đầu tiên của Việt Nam nằm trong mạng lưới các khu dự trữ sinh quyển của thế giới năm 2000.

Ngày 28.1.2019, Bộ Tài nguyên và Môi trường ban hành Quyết định số 220/QĐ-BTNMT phê duyệt Báo cáo đánh giá tác động môi trường dự án Khu du lịch biển Cần Giờ, với quy mô 2.870ha tại xã Long Hòa và thị trấn Cần Thạnh thuộc Cần Giờ.

Khu dự trữ sinh quyển Cần Giờ đã được UNESCO công nhận là Khu dự trữ sinh quyển thế giớiTrong ảnh: những cây Đước  đánh dấu đỏ nằm trong khu dự trữ sinh quyển Cần Giờ, muốn chặt đi phải xin phép UNESCO. Ảnh: Như Hùng


Theo UBND TP.HCM, trong công văn số 3715/BKHĐ-PC ngày 5.5.2017 Bộ Kế hoạch và Đầu tư đã có ý kiến thẩm quyền quyết định điều chỉnh chủ trương đầu tư thuộc Thủ tướng Chính phủ, do tổng vốn đầu tư là 217.053,967 tỷ đồng (lớn hơn 5.000 tỷ đồng) và có hạng mục xây dựng và kinh doanh sân golf.

“UBND TP.HCM có ý kiến về một số nội dung nêu trên, gửi Bộ Kế hoạch và Đầu tư để xem xét, thẩm định trình Thủ tướng Chính phủ quyết định chủ trương đầu tư dự án”, văn bản số 1049/UBND-DA viết.

Huy Phong

Trả lời

Mời bạn điền thông tin vào ô dưới đây hoặc kích vào một biểu tượng để đăng nhập:

WordPress.com Logo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản WordPress.com Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Google photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Google Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Twitter picture

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Twitter Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Facebook photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Facebook Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Connecting to %s