Foxconn considering iPhone factory in Vietnam as China trade war uncertainty continues

Apple’s biggest supply chain partner, Foxconn, is looking to start a new facility in Vietnam as a way to hedge against instability and uncertainty in its current production facilities due to the ongoing trade war between China and the US. Continue reading “Foxconn considering iPhone factory in Vietnam as China trade war uncertainty continues”

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Global Climate Risk Index

The annually published Global Climate Risk Index analyses to what extent countries have been affected by the impacts of weather-related loss events (storms, floods, heat waves etc.).

Publication
27 November 2018
Cover Climate Risk Index 2019
Who suffers Most from Extreme Weather Events? Weather-related Loss Events in 2017 and 1998 to 2017

The Global Climate Risk Index 2019 analyses to what extent countries and regions have been affected by impacts of weather-related loss events (storms, floods, heat waves etc.). The most recent data available — for 2017 and from 1998 to 2017 — were taken into account. The countries and territories affected most in 2017 were Puerto Rico, Sri Lanka as well as Dominica. For the period from 1998 to 2017 Puerto Rico, Honduras and Myanmar rank highest. Continue reading “Global Climate Risk Index”

Việt Nam ranks 6th on Global Climate Vulnerability list; MoNRE responds

Update: December, 04/2018 – 21:30

Phạm Văn Tân, deputy head of the Climate Change Department, Việt Nam’s Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MoNRE), presents the ministry’s response to climate change threats to the country. — VNS Photo Mai Hoàng

Viet Nam News By Mai Hoàng

Katowice, POLAND — At the 24th UN Conference on Climate Change (COP24), Germanwatch released the most up-to-date Climate Risk Index ranking, which analyses the extent to which each country has been affected by weather-related loss events. Continue reading “Việt Nam ranks 6th on Global Climate Vulnerability list; MoNRE responds”

7 Reasons U.S. Should Not Ratify UN Convention on the Law of the Sea

Heritage Foundation

Jun 4th, 2018 5 min read

Commentary By

Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D.@Bromund

Senior Research Fellow in Anglo-American Relations

James Jay Carafano@JJCarafano

Vice President, Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute

Brett D. Schaefer

Senior Research Fellow in International Regulatory Affairs

The UN Convention on the Law of the Sea requires that coastal nations pay royalties on their seabed resources to landlocked and developing countries.mizoula/Getty Images

KEY TAKEAWAYS

U.S. accession would provide no benefits not already available to the U.S., while creating unnecessary burdens and risks.

The U.S. does not need to join the convention in order to access oil and gas resources on its extended continental shelf, in the Arctic, or in the Gulf of Mexico.

Despite subsequent changes in 1994 that led the Clinton administration to support U.S. accession, the Trump administration should oppose accession to this treaty.

 
President Donald Trump recently proclaimed June 2018 to be National Ocean Month and stated his support for better utilizing the vast resources contained in America’s Exclusive Economic Zone, the 200-nautical mile zone off U.S. coasts over which the U.S. has jurisdiction. Continue reading “7 Reasons U.S. Should Not Ratify UN Convention on the Law of the Sea”