New Elevation Measure Shows Climate Change Could Quickly Swamp the Mekong Delta

scientificamerican.com

The surprise revelation means 12 million Vietnamese may need to retreat

New Elevation Measure Shows Climate Change Could Quickly Swamp the Mekong Delta
Ground truthing shows the vast Mekong Delta averages only 0.8 meter above sea level instead of the 2.6 meters officially quoted. Credit: Linh Pham Getty Images

A stunning 12 million people could be displaced by flooding in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta within half a century, according to new research led by Philip Minderhoud, a geographer at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. Minderhoud and his colleagues arrived at that surprising conclusion after analyzing ground-based measurements of the Mekong’s topography that the Vietnamese government shielded from Western scientists  for years. The results, published today in Nature Communications, show the Mekong’s elevation over sea level averages just 0.8 meter, which is almost two meters lower than commonly quoted estimates based on freely available satellite data.
Tiếp tục đọc “New Elevation Measure Shows Climate Change Could Quickly Swamp the Mekong Delta”

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Landslides in Mekong Delta get more severe

thesaigontimes.com
Van Huynh Tuesday,  May 29,2018,00:00 (GMT+7)
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Five houses collapse after a landslide along the O Mon River’s in Can Tho City on May 21 – PHOTO: LE HOANG VU

CAN THO – Landslides across the Mekong Delta region are getting more unpredictable and increasing in terms of location and speed, according to the Southern Institute of Water Resources Research.

After two landslides along the O Mon River in Can Tho City this month, 12 houses sank into the river, 28 houses collapsed, 35 others were on the brink of sliding, and a long stretch of roads and riverside crops were destroyed.

According to the city’s committee for natural disaster prevention-control and search-rescue, the two landslides caused damages of some VND30 billion. The city has provided nearly VND600 million to support affected households.

Vung Liem District of Vinh Long Province nearby has also witnessed a serious landslide recently, resulting in several houses falling into the river. Following this, the provincial government has decided to ban sand exploitation at 19 sites along the rivers of Tien, Co Chien, Hau and Pang Tra with combined areas of over 1,200 hectares. Tiếp tục đọc “Landslides in Mekong Delta get more severe”

Climate change is triggering a migrant crisis in Vietnam

Theconversation

The Vietnamese Mekong Delta is one of Earth’s most agriculturally productive regions and is of global importance for its exports of rice, shrimp, and fruit. The 18m inhabitants of this low-lying river delta are also some of the world’s most vulnerable to climate change. Over the last ten years around 1.7m people have migrated out of its vast expanse of fields, rivers and canals while only 700,000 have arrived.

On a global level migration to urban areas remains as high as ever: one person in every 200 moves from rural areas to the city every year. Against this backdrop it is difficult to attribute migration to individual causes, not least because it can be challenging to find people who have left a region in order to ask why they went and because every local context is unique. But the high net rate of migration away from Mekong Delta provinces is more than double the national average, and even higher in its most climate-vulnerable areas. This implies that there is something else – probably climate-related – going on here. Tiếp tục đọc “Climate change is triggering a migrant crisis in Vietnam”

Mẹ thiên nhiên và huỷ diệt bởi thủy điện không phải là vấn đề duy nhất của Đồng Bằng Sông Cửu Long

Không có khu vực đồng bằng nào trên thế giới bị đe doạ bởi biến đổi khí hậu trầm trọng như Sông Cửu Long. Liệu Việt Nam có hành động kịp thời để cứu nơi đây?

Loạt bài của Mongabay – Mongabay series

Tiếng Việt
Phần 1 – Liệu biến đổi khí hậu sẽ nhấn chìm Đồng bằng sông Cửu Long?
Phần 2 – Việt Nam cực kỳ lo lắng vì Trung Quốc và Lào xây đập trên Mekong
Phần 3 – Mẹ Thiên nhiên và huỷ diệt bởi thủy điện không phải là vấn đề duy nhất của Đồng bằng sông Cửu Long
Phần 4 – Kế hoạch cứu nguy Đồng bằng sông Cửu Long

English
Part 1 – Will climate change sink the Mekong Delta?
Part 2 – Vietnam sweats bullets as China and Laos dam the Mekong
Part 3 – Mother Nature and a hydropower onslaught aren’t the Mekong Delta’s only problems
Part 4 – A plan to save the Mekong Delta

Biến đổi khí hậu và các đập nước ở thượng nguồn đang đe dọa khu vực quan trọng này và vấn đề trở nên khó kiểm soát được. Nhưng có phải những vấn đề lớn nhất của ĐBSCL đều do chính Việt Nam tạo ra?

Đồng bằng sông Cửu Long của Việt Nam, nơi ở của gần 20 triệu người, là một trong những môi trường nông nghiệp có năng suất cao nhất trên thế giới, nhờ vào mạng lưới kênh rạch, đê, cửa cống và rãnh thoát nước phức tạp.

Về thế mạnh nông nghiệp của ĐBSCL, Việt Nam đã đi từ một nhà nhập khẩu gạo lâu năm và trở thành một nước xuất khẩu lớn. Tuy nhiên, nông dân trong khu vực rất quan tâm đến các chính sách an ninh lương thực của chính phủ, trong đó yêu cầu hầu hết đất đai của ĐBSCL phải được dành cho sản xuất lúa gạo. Và nhiều người trong số họ đang có biện pháp để phá vỡ các quy tắc, theo những cách mà không phải lúc nào cũng thân thiện với môi trường.
Tiếp tục đọc “Mẹ thiên nhiên và huỷ diệt bởi thủy điện không phải là vấn đề duy nhất của Đồng Bằng Sông Cửu Long”

Tài liệu: Hội nghị về Phát triển Bền vững ĐBSCL Thích ứng với BĐKH

Nguồn: http://dbscl.monre.gov.vn/

Hội nghị về Phát triển Bền vững Đồng Bằng Sông Cửu Long Thích ứng với Biến Đổi Khí Hậu
26 và 27/9/2017 tại Cần Thơ

1. Phát biểu chào mừng của UBND Tp. Cần Thơ (chủ tịch UBND Tp Cần Thơ)

2. Phát biểu chỉ đạo của Phó Thủ tướng Chính phủ (Vương Đình Huệ)

3. Đề dẫn: Đánh giá tổng quan về các thách thức đối với ĐBSCL (Hội đồng tư vấn BĐKH – Bộ TN&MT) Tiếp tục đọc “Tài liệu: Hội nghị về Phát triển Bền vững ĐBSCL Thích ứng với BĐKH”

Mekong Delta Plan

Mekong Delta Plan download

Mekong Delta Plan website

Presentation by Dr. Martijn van de Groep, Chief Technical Advisor, MDP (2013)

Speech by Prime Minister Mark Rutte at the Mekong Delta Plan High-Level Meeting (june 17, 2014)

Presentation by Michael Tonneijck, Royal HaskoningDVH (6/6/2015)

Presentation by Dr. Martijn van de Groep, Chief Technical Advisor, MDP (2016)

Assessment studies for the Mekong Delta Plan

Strategic Delta Planning team (for Bangladesh, Vietnam, Netherlands)

Mongabay Series: A plan to save the Mekong Delta

  A plan to save the Mekong Delta

Mongabay Series:
Part 1 – Will climate change sink the Mekong Delta?
Part 2 – Vietnam sweats bullets as China and Laos dam the Mekong
Part 3 – Mother Nature and a hydropower onslaught aren’t the Mekong Delta’s only problems
Part 4 – A plan to save the Mekong Delta

18 October 2016 / David Brown

Rising seas and upstream dams are threatening to hammer the fertile region. Can Vietnam act in time to stave off disaster?

  • The Mekong Delta Plan is the product of several years’ work by Dutch and Vietnamese officials, supported by a platoon of experts from both nations.
  • It’s a blueprint for dealing not only with the effects of climate change and upstream dams but also with certain shortsighted activities by the Vietnamese themselves.
  • The region’s farmers as well as the relevant branches of government must be persuaded to buy into the plan.
This is the final installment of an in-depth, four-part series exploring threats facing the Mekong Delta and how they might be addressed. Read the firstsecond, third and fourth installments.“I think this year Vietnam got a taste of the new normal,” said Dinh Tuyen, my journalist friend in bustling Can Tho, the Mekong Delta’s hub city. “Less fresh water from rains or from up the river, and more salt water as sea levels rise.”We’d been talking about a story Tuyen had written in May for Thanh Nien, a leading Vietnamese daily. It featured photos of blue-green river waters, and called attention to a remarkable development: the Mekong’s southern branch was not, as usual, muddy with a cargo of silt. Tiếp tục đọc “Mongabay Series: A plan to save the Mekong Delta”

Mongabay series: Mother Nature and a hydropower onslaught aren’t the Mekong Delta’s only problems

Mother Nature and a hydropower onslaught aren’t the Mekong Delta’s only problems 

Mongabay Series:
Part 1 – Will climate change sink the Mekong Delta?
Part 2 – Vietnam sweats bullets as China and Laos dam the Mekong
Part 3 – Mother Nature and a hydropower onslaught aren’t the Mekong Delta’s only problems
Part 4 – A plan to save the Mekong Delta

13 October 2016 / David Brown

Climate change and dams going in upstream are threatening to render the crucial region unviable. But are the Delta’s biggest problems of Vietnam’s own making?

  • Vietnam’s Mekong Delta, home to nearly 20 million people, is one of the most highly productive agricultural environments in the world, thanks in part to an elaborate network of canals, dikes, sluice gates and drainage ditches.
  • On the strength of Delta agriculture, Vietnam has gone from a chronic importer of rice to a major exporter.
  • But farmers in the region are critical of the government’s food security policies, which mandate that most of the Delta’s land be devoted to rice production. And many of them are taking measures to circumvent those rules, in ways that aren’t always friendly to the environment.
  • That’s just one example of how water and land-use policy in the Delta is undermining efforts to protect the vulnerable region from climate change and upstream development.

This is the third article of an in-depth, four-part series exploring threats facing the Mekong Delta and how they might be addressed. Read the  first, secondthird and fourth installments. Tiếp tục đọc “Mongabay series: Mother Nature and a hydropower onslaught aren’t the Mekong Delta’s only problems”

Mongabay series: Vietnam sweats bullets as China and Laos dam the Mekong

Vietnam sweats bullets as China and Laos dam the Mekong

Mongabay Series:
Part 1 – Will climate change sink the Mekong Delta?
Part 2 – Vietnam sweats bullets as China and Laos dam the Mekong
Part 3 – Mother Nature and a hydropower onslaught aren’t the Mekong Delta’s only problems
Part 4 – A plan to save the Mekong Delta

6 October 2016 / David Brown

Tiếp tục đọc “Mongabay series: Vietnam sweats bullets as China and Laos dam the Mekong”

Mongabay series: Will climate change sink the Mekong Delta

Will climate change sink the Mekong Delta?

Mongabay Series:
Part 1 – Will climate change sink the Mekong Delta?
Part 2 – Vietnam sweats bullets as China and Laos dam the Mekong
Part 3 – Mother Nature and a hydropower onslaught aren’t the Mekong Delta’s only problems
Part 4 – A plan to save the Mekong Delta

3 October 2016 / David Brown

No delta region in the world is more threatened by climate change. Will Vietnam act in time to save it?

  • Scientists say the 1-meter sea level rise expected by century’s end will displace 3.5-5 million Mekong Delta residents. A 2-meter sea level rise could force three times that to higher ground.
  • Shifting rainfall and flooding patterns are also threatening one of the most highly productive agricultural environments in the world.
  • The onus is now on Vietnam’s government in Hanoi to approve a comprehensive adaptation and mitigation plan.
This is the first article of an in-depth, four-part series exploring threats facing the Mekong Delta and how they might be addressed. Read the first, secondthird and fourth installments.It’s a sad fact that several decades of talk about climate change have hardly anywhere yet led to serious efforts to adapt to phenomena that are virtually unavoidable. Neuroscientists say that’s because we’re humans. We aren’t wired to respond to large, complex, slow-moving threats. Our instinctive response is apathy, not action.

That paradox was much on my mind during a recent visit back to Vietnam’s fabulously fertile Mekong Delta, a soggy plain the size of Switzerland. Here the livelihood of 20 percent of Vietnam’s 92 million people is gravely threatened by climate change and by a manmade catastrophe, the seemingly unstoppable damming of the upper reaches of the Mekong River. Tiếp tục đọc “Mongabay series: Will climate change sink the Mekong Delta”