In Vietnam, the Ghost of Agent Orange Still Looms Large

50 years after the herbicide was used by the U.S. during the Vietnam War, Agent Orange continues to wreak havoc.

thediplomat_Some nights, the illuminated oval-shaped building hovering over a thick row of trees keeps Trinh Bui Kokkoris, 48, restless. Each time she looks out of the window from her apartment in Brooklyn Heights, the sight of the U.S. District Court reminds Trinh of the lawsuit she and her husband lost more than a decade ago with other Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange. Tiếp tục đọc “In Vietnam, the Ghost of Agent Orange Still Looms Large”

First Agent Orange, now Roundup: what’s Monsanto up to in Vietnam? Ecologist Special Investigation

The Ecologist, Mick Grant
10th October 2016

A keyboard player, blind from birth due to a genetic defect induced by Agent Orange, performing at the War Remnants Museum. Photo: Mick Grant.
A keyboard player, blind from birth due to a genetic defect induced by Agent Orange, performing at the War Remnants Museum. Photo: Mick Grant.

With the International Monsanto Tribunal beginning this week (14-16 October) in The Hague, MICK GRANT reports from Vietnam with this special investigation for The Ecologist five decades after the company’s lethal herbicide Agent Orange first devastated the country – and discovers the agribusiness giant is sneaking its way back into Vietnam with modern herbicides and ‘Roundup-Ready’ GMO crops.

Tiếp tục đọc “First Agent Orange, now Roundup: what’s Monsanto up to in Vietnam? Ecologist Special Investigation”

Hơn 100.000 nạn nhân da cam chưa được hưởng chính sách

Thứ sáu, 08/07/2016, 07:39 (GMT+7)

Cuộc sống những gia đình nạn nhân chất độc da cam/dioxin gặp rất nhiều khó khăn

(SGGP).- Tại buổi họp báo ngày 7-7 tại Hà Nội giới thiệu chuỗi hoạt động kỷ niệm 55 năm thảm họa da cam/dioxin ở Việt Nam (10-8-1961 – 10-8-2016). Thượng tướng Nguyễn Văn Rinh – Chủ tịch Hội Nạn nhân chất độc da cam/dioxin Việt Nam (VAVA) cho biết, Tiếp tục đọc “Hơn 100.000 nạn nhân da cam chưa được hưởng chính sách”

In photos: Elderly Vietnamese woman devotes life to disabled sons

TUOI TRE NEWS

UPDATED : 07/24/2016 19:04 GMT + 7

A septuagenarian woman in the central Vietnamese province of Quang Binh has raised and taken care of her two disabled sons who are victims of Agent Orange (AO)/dioxin on her own for more than four decades.

Nguyen Van Hai, 44, and Nguyen Van Hien, 41, who are both victims of dioxin, have been in the loving care of their 73-year-old mother Tran Thi Dang, of Le Thuy District, in the last 44 years.
Tiếp tục đọc “In photos: Elderly Vietnamese woman devotes life to disabled sons”

Công nghệ tẩy độc đất nhiễm nặng chất diệt cỏ/dioxin bằng phân hủy sinh học

21/7/2010 16:34.

VASTTừ năm 1999 đến năm 2009, các nhà khoa học Viện Công nghệ Sinh học, Viện Khoa học Công nghệ Việt Nam đã nghiên cứu một số công nghệ để  tẩy độc đất nhiễm nặng chất diệt cỏ/dioxin bằng phân hủy sinh học (bioremediation) ở căn cứ quân sự của Mỹ nguỵ cũ tại Đà Nẵng. Kết quả cho thấy ở các qui mô phòng thí nghiệm đến  pilot hiện trường từ 0,5 – 100 m3 hiệu quả khử độc đạt từ 40 – 100 pgTEQ/ ngày.


Thi công xử lý ô nhiễm dioxin tại Đà Nẵng Tiếp tục đọc “Công nghệ tẩy độc đất nhiễm nặng chất diệt cỏ/dioxin bằng phân hủy sinh học”

U.S. helping defuse Vietnam’s dioxin hot spots blamed on Agent Orange

April 8

Project RENEW’s Prosthetics and Orthotics Mobile Outreach Program

LM – Project RENEW established a mobile outreach program to provide prostheses, orthotics and education to explosive remnants of war survivors in the remote communities of Vietnam.

Susan Eckey, Former Deputy Director General for Humanitarian Affairs, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, visits with the P&O team. Photo courtesy of Dang Quang Toan/Project RENEW.

Susan Eckey, Former Deputy Director General for Humanitarian Affairs, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, visits with the P&O team.
Photo courtesy of Dang Quang Toan/Project RENEW.

According to a 2014 report compiled by Vietnam’s Department of Labour, Invalids and Social Affairs, Quang Tri province currently has 37,292 persons with disabilities, 13,023 of whom were disabled by Agent Orange and 5,094 by explosive remnants of war (ERW).1,2,3 Disabled persons living in rural areas often live in poverty and do not have access to basic services. For those with injuries resulting from unexploded ordnance (UXO), prosthetics are difficult to obtain. Tiếp tục đọc “Project RENEW’s Prosthetics and Orthotics Mobile Outreach Program”

170,000 người thoát khỏi nguy cơ bị phơi nhiễm dioxin

19-03-2015 image

UNDP – Hà Nội, ngày 19 tháng 3 năm 2015 – 170,000 người dân sống ở khu vực gần sân bay Biên Hòa ở miền Nam và các vùng lân cận của căn cứ không quân Phù Cát ở miền Trung sẽ không còn phải đối mặt với nguy cơ bị phơi nhiễm dioxin.

Văn phòng Ban Chỉ đạo Quốc gia (Văn phòng 33) và Chương trình Phát triển Liên Hợp Quốc (UNDP) đã công bố kết quả này trong hội nghị tổng kết dự án tại Hà Nội vào ngày 19 tháng 3 năm 2015. Tại hội nghị, các kết quả chính của dự án “Xử lý dioxin tại các vùng ô nhiễm nặng ở Việt Nam” đã được chia sẻ với Chính phủ và các đối tác phát triển cũng như các chuyên gia, các nhà nghiên cứu trong nước và quốc tế. Tiếp tục đọc “170,000 người thoát khỏi nguy cơ bị phơi nhiễm dioxin”

When the U.S. dropped barrel bombs in war

Washington Post
By Ishaan Tharoor February 16

People inspect damage at a site hit by what activists said were barrel bombs dropped by forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo’s district of al-Sukari on March 7, 2014. (Hosam Katan/Reuters)

“It’s a childish story that keeps repeating in the West,” smiled Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, in an interview with the BBC last week. He was dismissing allegations that his regime is attacking Syrian civilians with barrel bombs, crude devices packed with fuel and shrapnel that inflict brutal, indiscriminate damage. Tiếp tục đọc “When the U.S. dropped barrel bombs in war”

The Lethal Legacy of the Vietnam War

Fifty years after the first US troops came ashore at Da Nang, the Vietnamese are still coping with unexploded bombs and Agent Orange.

By George Black
The Nation
February 25, 2015

On a mild, sunny morning last November, Chuck Searcy and I drove out along a spur of the old Ho Chi Minh Trail to the former Marine base at Khe Sanh, which sits in a bowl of green mountains and coffee plantations in Vietnam’s Quang Tri province, hard on the border with Laos. The seventy-seven-day siege of Khe Sanh in early 1968, coinciding with the Tet Offensive, was the longest battle of what Vietnamese call the American War and a pivotal event in the conflict. By the off-kilter logic of Saigon and Washington, unleashing enough technology and firepower to produce a ten-to-one kill ratio was a metric of success, but the televised carnage of 1968, in which 16,592 Americans died, was too much for audiences back home. After Tet and Khe Sanh, the war was no longer America’s to win, only to avoid losing. Tiếp tục đọc “The Lethal Legacy of the Vietnam War”