From Zero to hero, the various case of Vietnam’s renewable energy

On the boil

*On the boil newsletter co-founded by 2 girls with a dream to see Vietnam become a leader in the fight against climate change.  The newsletter delivers the information in a digestible format,

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From Zero to hero, the various case of Vietnam’s renewable energy

In January, a humble “S-shaped” country in South East Asia became the talk of the town. Having been “chasing the sun”, Vietnam saw a boom in rooftop solar installations at the end of 2020. It beat all forecasts, even that of Bloomberg, who made an entire podcast episode featuring Vietnam’s race to green energy.

Before we get to the real meat of what happened, let us first take a step back to look at the whole relationship between energy and climate, and why moving to green energy matters.

  • All living things on the planet contain carbon [insert Sir. David Attenborough‘s voiceover here]. When organisms died hundreds of millions of years ago, their remains got buried deep under layers of sediment and rock. Under high heat and pressure, they were slow-cooked into carbon-rich deposits we now call fossil fuels, i.e. coal, oil and natural gas.
  • Fast forward to the 18th century. The Industrial Revolution unlocked the huge potential of fossil fuels as an abundant source of energy. Since then, fossil fuels have rapidly established themselves as the major source of power, supplying about 84% of global energy in 2019.
  • Now back to Chemistry 101: when we burn fossil fuels for energy, the carbon atoms (C) that have been stored away for millennia meet with oxygen (O), releasing an enormous amount of CO2. Unsurprisingly, 81% of total CO2 emissions from 1959 to 2019 comes from burning oil, coal, and natural gas. This is bad news for our friend Earth, as CO2 is a long-lived greenhouse gas capable of trapping heat from sunlight, causing global warming.
  • The answer is no…if 1) we move away from fossil fuels and into low-carbon, renewable energy (RE) and 2) we reduce energy consumption and increase energy efficiency. In this issue, we’ll zoom in on the first solution.
  • From 1965 to 2019, the share of renewables (e.g. solar, wind, hydropower) in the energy mix almost doubled from 6% to 11%. This seems…puny compared to that of fossil fuels. On the bright side, the recent net-zero emission targets set by the world’s major economies as well as big corporates in an effort to slow climate change are expected to accelerate renewables’ growth.
  • Vietnam is also encouraging a shift from fossil fuel to renewables, in order to meet its CO2 emission mitigation target.

Vietnam – from zero to hero on the renewables Tiếp tục đọc “From Zero to hero, the various case of Vietnam’s renewable energy”

India most corrupt Asian country, Vietnam second: Forbes

Business Standard

The article goes on to praise Prime Minister Narendra Modi for his ‘fight against corruption.

ANI  |  New Delhi  Last Updated at September 1, 2017 15:11 IST

India corruption

Image: Shutterstock
If the statistics furnished by the Transparency International (TI), an anti-corruption global civil society organisation, are anything to go by, India has a long way ahead to fulfil one of the many objectives as told by the current Indian government – defeating the malice of corruption.

A recent survey by the Transparency International states that India is the most corrupt country in Asia.

Depicting how pervasive the problem is across Asia, a list released by – Asia’s Five Most Corrupt Countries – says that India beats Vietnam, Thailand, Pakistan and Myanmar, when it comes to bribery rate.

The article, which rates India the highest in the list with 69 per cent bribery rate, describes India as: “In five of the six public services – schools, hospitals, ID documents, police, and utility services – more than half the respondents have had to pay a

The article goes on to praise Prime Minister for his ‘fight against corruption’.

“However, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s fight against corruption has made a mark: 53 per cent of the people think he is going it fairly or very well. And it has led to people feeling empowered, as 63 per cent believe ordinary people can make a difference,” it adds.

India is closely followed by at 65 per cent bribery rate.

India’s neighbour, Pakistan, stands fourth in the list with 40 per cent bribery rate. The article describes the nation as: “In Pakistan, about three-fourths of respondents perceive most or all of the police to be corrupt. Of the people who encountered either the police or the courts, nearly seven in ten had to pay a Sadly, people don’t feel things can change-only a third think ordinary people can make a difference.”

The 18-month long survey by Transparency International was concluded after talking to more than 20,000 people in 16 countries, regions and territories in the Asia Pacific.

The Berlin-based corruption watchdog had put India at rank 76 out of 168 countries in its Corruption Perception Index last year.

The country’s 2015 corruption perception score remained the same as 2014’s – 38/100 – showing lack of improvement.

According to figures published in March, 2017, while citizens of Pakistan were the most likely of any country to be asked for bribes in law and order institutions, for India the police bribery rate was 54 per cent and for a low 12 per cent.

India had the highest bribery rates of all the countries surveyed for access to public schools (58 per cent) and healthcare (59 per cent).

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

First Published: Fri, September 01 2017. 14:59 IST

Peak oil in the South China Sea (part 2)

China’s crude oil production has apparently peaked and is back to where it was at the beginning of 2010.

Fig 1: China’s crude oil production http://www.jodidb.org/

Tiếp tục đọc “Peak oil in the South China Sea (part 2)”

Peak oil in the South China Sea (part 1)

The recent deployment of missile launchers and jet fighters on Woody Island of the Paracel islands have put the spotlight on the South China Sea (SCS).

Fig 1: The 200 mile Economic Exclusion Zone claimed by China around Woody Island and the overlapping 108 nm range of the HQ-9 SAM system. Image via ISI. [Image Sat International]   http://defense-update.com/20160218_woody_island_hq9.html

In this post, we focus on oil production around the SCS. Tiếp tục đọc “Peak oil in the South China Sea (part 1)”

These angels bring warmth into the lives of Hanoi’s homeless elderly

Students and young professionals are among the volunteers stepping in to help the sick and homeless elderly, who otherwise die alone and uncared-for on the streets

The street is poorly lit and dirty, but it is this man’s only refuge and home on some nights.

Huddled against the wind chill, Mr Nguyen, who is wrapped up in three layers of clothes, grumbles about how his hands are sore, and his back painful from repairing bicycles. Without hesitation, Ms Chu reaches across and gently massages his knobby fingers.

Along with other volunteers of the Ấm Volunteering Club, the young woman has been providing free weekly health screenings and medical supplies for the homeless elderly. Tiếp tục đọc “These angels bring warmth into the lives of Hanoi’s homeless elderly”

A Nation, Building

by JOHN S. ROSENBERG

MAY-JUNE 2014

Hanoi’s streets (in 2007, above) are now full of motorcycles and scooters, and shop shelves are no longer bare.

Hanoi’s streets (in 2007, above) are now full of motorcycles and scooters, and shop shelves are no longer bare. Photograph by Chau Doan/Getty Images

harvardmagazine A RECENT Monday morning, during a class on global trade, the professor reviewed the effects of nations’ limits on such commerce: tariffs, quotas, and the “voluntary” restraints exporting countries impose on their shipments to eager customers (lest protected interests in the importing area wilt). His students, arrayed in a teaching amphitheater laid out like the classrooms at Harvard Business School (HBS)—complete with laminated placards bearing each Tiếp tục đọc “A Nation, Building”

Vietnam Plans Move Away From Coal

January 28th, 2016 by

cleantecnica – Vietnam Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has announced his government’s intention to “review development plans of all new coal plants and halt any new coal power development.”

Vietnam prime minister

Nguyễn Tấn Dũng, Prime Minister of Vietnam

According to Solarplaza, the Premier stated that Vietnam needs to “responsibly implement all international commitments in cutting down greenhouse gas emissions; and to accelerate investment in renewable energy.”

The announcement comes in advance of the Solar PV Trade Mission, scheduled April 18 – 22 in Hanoi and Bangkok. It is hoped the trade missions will assemble diverse high-level delegations of stakeholders from around the world into emerging markets to jointly explore and create business development opportunities.
Tiếp tục đọc “Vietnam Plans Move Away From Coal”

Viet Nam has some 1.75 million child labourers

Around 1.75 million children, or nearly 10 per cent of children age 5 to 17 in Viet Nam, are child labourers. — Photo baogiaothong.vn

HA NOI (VNS) — Some 1.75 million children, or nearly 10 per cent of children age 5 to 17 in Viet Nam, are child labourers, according to an International Labour Organisation (ILO) report.

The report was released on June 12 to coincide with World Day Against Child Labour. Tiếp tục đọc “Viet Nam has some 1.75 million child labourers”