Bac Lieu has high hopes for renewable energy

Last update 07:50 | 15/01/2018
VietNamNet Bridge – Soon after the Prime Minister agreed to Bac Lieu province’s proposal to cancel the Cai Cung thermopower project, investors visited the area to seek opportunities to develop renewable power projects.

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Vietnam wants to develop ‘clean power’

Duong Thanh Trung, chair of Bac Lieu‘s People’s Committee, in late 2017 confirmed that the PM had agreed to remove Cai Cung project from the electricity development program. This will pave the way for the province to step up the development of renewable energy.

He revealed that many investors had come to Bac Lieu, promising investment capital of VND100 trillion for green energy. Continue reading “Bac Lieu has high hopes for renewable energy”

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12 Charts That Shook the Earth in 2017: trends in the global energy transformation

by Emma Foehringer Merchant 
January 09, 2018

Greentechmedia

1. Here comes storage

Toward the end of last year, Tesla installed the largest lithium-ion battery ever deployed in South Australia. It was a high-profile example of a powerful trend: storage combinations that are starting to compete with natural-gas power plants.

According to a GTM Research analysis of South Australia’s electricity market, by 2025, solar-plus-storage and standalone batteries will compete with new and existing open-cycle gas turbines for meeting peak load. By 2035, renewables and storage will beat gas for baseload and peak power. Continue reading “12 Charts That Shook the Earth in 2017: trends in the global energy transformation”

Đinh chính những hiểu lầm về năng lượng tái tạo tại Việt Nam (P5)

Đinh chính những hiểu lầm về năng lượng tái tạo tại Việt Nam (P7)

Đinh chính những hiểu lầm về năng lượng tái tạo tại Việt Nam (P6)

Đinh chính những hiểu lầm về năng lượng tái tạo tại Việt Nam (P3)

GreenID mong muốn giúp cộng đồng hiểu rõ những hiểu lầm thường gặp đang cản trở sự phát triển của NLTT tại Việt Nam và hy vọng rằng cuốn tài liệu này sẽ mang lại những thông tin bổ ích cho người đọc.

Hiểu lầm 1. NLTT không ổn định, thường làm gián đoạn quá trình cung cấp điện và không thể cung cấp điện liên tục 24/24.

Hiểu lầm 2. NLTT đắt đỏ và xa xỉ, chỉ phù hợp với những quốc gia phát triển

Đinh chính những hiểu lầm về năng lượng tái tạo tại Việt Nam (P4)

Đinh chính những hiểu lầm về năng lượng tái tạo tại Việt Nam (P2)

GreenID mong muốn giúp cộng đồng hiểu rõ những hiểu lầm thường gặp đang cản trở sự phát triển của NLTT tại Việt Nam và hy vọng rằng cuốn tài liệu này sẽ mang lại những thông tin bổ ích cho người đọc.

Hiểu lầm 1. NLTT không ổn định, thường làm gián đoạn quá trình cung cấp điện và không thể cung cấp điện liên tục 24/24.

Hiểu lầm 2. NLTT đắt đỏ và xa xỉ, chỉ phù hợp với những quốc gia phát triển

No daylight for Vietnam solar energy

Silhouette of two women carrying wicker baskets trekking across the sand dunes at Bau Trang, Binh Thuan Province in Vietnam at the break of dawn. Photo: iStock/ Getty Images

Silhouette of two women carrying wicker baskets trekking across the sand dunes at Bau Trang, Binh Thuan Province in Vietnam at the break of dawn. Photo: iStock/ Getty Images

While some see bright prospects for an alternative power boom, high tariffs, regulatory risk and a volatile currency have kept the industry in the dark

 HO CHI MINH CITY, DECEMBER 14, 2017 9:55 AM (UTC+8)

atimes.com_Some here are calling it a gold rush. From Thailand to the United Arab Emirates, global players with experience in solar energy are sending representatives to Vietnam in search of the next big alternative energy boom.
Continue reading “No daylight for Vietnam solar energy”

Southeast Asia’s largest wind project gets $1.1 billion funding injection

Southeast Asia’s leading nation for solar energy—Thailand—could now be the frontrunner in wind energy after renewables developer WEH secured funding for the region’s biggest wind power project yet.

Eco-business_The Chaiyaphum Wind Farm in Thailand’s Subyai district, Chaiyaphum province. Rising energy use in Southeast Asia is shifting the global energy system’s center of gravity towards Asia. Image: © Asian Development Bank .

Thai renewables developer Wind Energy Holdings Co. Ltd (WEH) has raised US$1.1 billion to finance five new onshore wind farms in what is billed as Southeast Asia’s biggest wind energy project yet.Located in Thailand’s northeastern provinces of Nakhon Ratchasima and Chaiyaphum, the wind farms will add up to 450 megawatts of energy to the national grid on completion, slated for early 2019.Towering at a height of 157 metres, the wind farms will boast the tallest towers in the region, and will use the latest technology supplied by Vestas and General Electric. Siam Commercial Bank is financing the project. Continue reading “Southeast Asia’s largest wind project gets $1.1 billion funding injection”

The World Bank Year in Review: 2017 in 12 Charts

Worldbank.org

How to sum up 2017? The global economy improved but there were plenty of unsettling and upsetting events and trends. Catastrophic storms and flooding wrecked homes and livelihoods from South Asia to the Caribbean. Education quality in many countries fell short even as much of the world raced into the digital age. Yet extreme poverty continues to decline. Innovation and technology are enhancing the quality of life. And human capital is now the biggest driver of wealth in the world today. Here’s what 2017 looked like in 12 charts.

1. Millions faced famine and required emergency aid

2. The world emitted historic amounts of carbon

3. Natural disasters dominated the news

4. Two-thirds of global wealth is human capital

5. There’s a crisis in learning

6. Nutrition affects learning, and millions of children remain stunted

7. Child marriage carried high personal and economic costs

8. The world’s population is young. And jobless.

9. Natural capital and biodiversity are undervalued

10. Globally, about half of elections are considered free and fair

11. Starting a business is getting easier

12. The power of renewables

A Tribute to Hans Rosling

Continue reading “The World Bank Year in Review: 2017 in 12 Charts”

What’s Up in Coal Country: Alternative-Energy Jobs

NYtimes_From the mountain hollows of Appalachia to the vast open plains of Wyoming, the coal industry long offered the promise of a six-figure income without a four-year college degree, transforming sleepy farm towns into thriving commercial centers.

But today, as King Coal is being dethroned — by cheap natural gas, declining demand for electricity, and even green energy — what’s a former miner to do?

Nowhere has that question had more urgency than in Wyoming and West Virginia, two very different states whose economies lean heavily on fuel extraction. With energy prices falling or stagnant, both have lost population and had middling economic growth in recent years. In national rankings of economic vitality, you can find them near the bottom of the pile. Continue reading “What’s Up in Coal Country: Alternative-Energy Jobs”

Germany’s Transition from Coal to Renewables Offers Lessons for the World

Scientificamerican.org  
Germany's Transition from Coal to Renewables Offers Lessons for the World
Credit: Krisztian Bocsi Getty Images

From Ensia (find the original story here), from an article commissioned by Courier; reprinted with permission.

August 1, 2017—Seventy-seven-year-old Heinz Spahn—whose blue eyes are both twinkling and stern—vividly recalls his younger days. The Zollverein coal mine, where he worked in the area of Essen, Germany, was so clogged with coal dust, he remembers, that people would stir up a black cloud whenever they moved. “It was no pony farm,” he says—using the sardonic German phrase to describe the harsh conditions: The roar of machines was at a constant 110 decibels, and the men were nicknamed waschbar, or “raccoons,” for the black smudges that permanently adorned their faces. Continue reading “Germany’s Transition from Coal to Renewables Offers Lessons for the World”

Can coal miners become solar technician?

Nothing on Earth moves without energy, and most of the energy that people use is of the fossil variety: coal, oil, and natural gas. Although renewable energy is beginning to make inroads, fossil fuels still account for 78 percent of global final energy consumption as of 2014, according to REN21’s Global Status Report 2016It is abundantly clear that a fundamental energy makeover is needed if we are to avoid climate chaos—especially with regard to coal, the dirtiest fuel of them all. Until recently, global coal production and use were still growing.

Advocates for renewable energy are typically consumed with matters like technology development, cost competitiveness, and policy support for deploying solar, wind, and other renewables. But the social dimension of the energy transition is just as crucial: in moving away from polluting sources of energy, we need to make sure that the workers who for decades have dug up coal aren’t left in the lurch. These are the people who have often paid with their health so that the rest of us could power air conditioners, refrigerators, TVs, and gadgets galore. Continue reading “Can coal miners become solar technician?”