Why Investors Should Consider Vietnam’s Electric Vehicle Market

 June 29, 2021 Posted byVietnam Briefing Written byPritesh Samuel Reading Time:6 minutes

  • Vietnam’s electric vehicle market remains in its infancy, but there are plenty of opportunities as we are likely to see a paradigm shift from gasoline to electric-powered vehicles.
  • With a rising population and an expanding middle class, consumers are increasingly aware of the environment, fuel efficiency, and increasing pollution levels in cities.
  • Vietnam Briefing outlines the opportunities in Vietnam’s electric vehicle market despite the slow progress till date.

The electric vehicle market in Vietnam has not garnered as much attention compared to other countries in the region and globally, but this doesn’t mean that opportunities are not there. Electric vehicles are an irreversible trend and will be the future as governments move towards clean energy and consider the environment. This means that investors that are interested can set up the groundwork including production facilities, supply chains, and manpower to prepare for this future shift.

With a population of more than 96 million, about half of Vietnam’s population owns motorcycles, while car ownership is at a ratio of 23 per 1,000 people. Major cities such as Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City are gridlocked with motorbikes on streets, alleys, and even sidewalks. This in turn has resulted in increased pollution and congestion. Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City have ranked high in pollution levels globally several times. A poll by IQAir listed Vietnam as the 15th most polluted country in the world.

Tiếp tục đọc “Why Investors Should Consider Vietnam’s Electric Vehicle Market”

Asian cities face perfect storm of environmental hazards

phys.org

by Marlowe Hood

Across the globe, more than 400 large cities with a total population of 1.5 billion are at high or extreme risk
Across the globe, more than 400 large cities with a total population of 1.5 billion are at high or extreme risk

Of the 100 cities worldwide most vulnerable to environmental hazards all but one are in Asia, and most are in India or China, according to a risk assessment published Thursday.

Tiếp tục đọc “Asian cities face perfect storm of environmental hazards”

Linking Air Pollution To Higher Coronavirus Death Rates

Harvard.edu

recent Harvard analysis led by Professor Francesca Dominici along with Doctoral student Xiao Wu and Assistant Professor Rachel Nethery is the first nationwide study to show a statistical link between COVID-19 deaths and other diseases associated with long-term exposure to fine particulate matter. The paper has been submitted for peer review and publication in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Tiếp tục đọc “Linking Air Pollution To Higher Coronavirus Death Rates”

Vietnamese people resort to portable oxygen cylinders for respite from smog

Monday, November 25, 2019, 14:56 GMT+7 Tuoi Tre
Vietnamese people resort to portable oxygen cylinders for respite from smog
A woman inhales through a portable oxygen canister in Ho Chi Minh City. Photo: T.Duong / Tuoi Tre

As Vietnam’s big cities have been engulfed in toxic air for months, some Vietnamese people have turned to a novel solution – buying hits of purified oxygen to escape the pollution.

According to data by AirVisual, an independent online air quality index monitor, Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam’s two largest cities, are frequently listed among the world’s worst 20 metropolises in terms of air quality. Tiếp tục đọc “Vietnamese people resort to portable oxygen cylinders for respite from smog”

WHO reveals shocking figures on air pollution deaths

UNITED NATIONS — You may want to put on a gas mask after you read the latest report from the World Health Organization (WHO) on urban air pollution. The WHO says nine out of ten people are subjected to high levels of pollutants from the air they breathe. Tiếp tục đọc “WHO reveals shocking figures on air pollution deaths”

Evidence mounts for Alzheimer’s, suicide risks among youth in polluted cities

sciencedaily.com

Date: April 13, 2018
Source: The University of Montana
Summary: Researchers have published a new study that reveals increased risks for Alzheimer’s and suicide among children and young adults living in polluted megacities.

FULL STORY

This is pollution haze over Mexico City.
Credit: Lilian Calderón-Garcidueñas

A University of Montana researcher and her collaborators have published a new study that reveals increased risks for Alzheimer’s and suicide among children and young adults living in polluted megacities.

Dr. Lilian Calderón-Garcidueñas said her group studied 203 autopsies of Mexico City residents ranging in age from 11 months to 40 years. Metropolitan Mexico City is home to 24 million people exposed daily to concentrations of fine particulate matter and ozone above U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. The researchers tracked two abnormal proteins that indicate development of Alzheimer’s, and they detected the early stages of the disease in babies less than a year old. Tiếp tục đọc “Evidence mounts for Alzheimer’s, suicide risks among youth in polluted cities”

Photochemical smog threatens public health in HCM City

Last update 18:49 | 24/01/2018

People living in HCM City are suffering from photochemical smog, a kind of air pollution that’s harmful to human health.

Photochemical smog threatens public health in HCM City, social news, vietnamnet bridge, english news, Vietnam news, news Vietnam, vietnamnet news, Vietnam net news, Vietnam latest news, vn news, Vietnam breaking news
HCM City people suffer from photochemical blindness, a kind of air pollution that’s harmful to human health.— Photo nld.com.vn

Photochemical smog is caused by the interaction of solar ultraviolet radiation, engine exhaust emissions and industrial emissions.

It has become a frequent phenomenon in recent years, especially during the hot and dry summer months. Photochemical smog is widespread in large cities such as Hà Nội and HCM City, posing increasingly serious risks to public health. Tiếp tục đọc “Photochemical smog threatens public health in HCM City”

Liệu ô nhiễm không khí đang gây sạt lở đất ở Trung Quốc? – Is air pollution causing landslides in China?

Highlights

• Cracks caused by mining under the potential slide rock mass ruptured the aquiclude.
• Acid rain supplied nutrients to organisms decomposing organic matrix in the shale.
• Acid rain reduced strength of the shale layer on which the failure surface formed.

Tiếp tục đọc “Liệu ô nhiễm không khí đang gây sạt lở đất ở Trung Quốc? – Is air pollution causing landslides in China?”

Gánh nặng bệnh tật do nhiệt điện đốt than ở Đông Nam Á – Burden of Disease from Rising Coal-Fired Power Plant Emissions in Southeast Asia

 Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 United States
 John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 United States
§ Greenpeace International, 1066 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
 Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 United States
Environ. Sci. Technol.201751 (3), pp 1467–1476
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b03731
Publication Date (Web): January 12, 2017
Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society
*Phone: 617 496 9428; e-mail: skoplitz@fas.harvard.edu.

ACS AuthorChoice – This is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.

Abstract

Abstract Image

Southeast Asia has a very high population density and is on a fast track to economic development, with most of the growth in electricity demand currently projected to be met by coal. From a detailed analysis of coal-fired power plants presently planned or under construction in Southeast Asia, we project in a business-as-usual scenario that emissions from coal in the region will triple to 2.6 Tg a–1 SO2 and 2.6 Tg a–1 NOx by 2030, with the largest increases occurring in Indonesia and Vietnam. Simulations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model show large resulting increases in surface air pollution, up to 11 μg m–3 for annual mean fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in northern Vietnam and up to 15 ppb for seasonal maximum 1 h ozone in Indonesia. We estimate 19 880 (11 400–28 400) excess deaths per year from Southeast Asian coal emissions at present, increasing to 69 660 (40 080–126 710) by 2030. 9000 of these excess deaths in 2030 are in China. As Chinese emissions from coal decline in coming decades, transboundary pollution influence from rising coal emissions in Southeast Asia may become an increasing issue.

Tiếp tục đọc “Gánh nặng bệnh tật do nhiệt điện đốt than ở Đông Nam Á – Burden of Disease from Rising Coal-Fired Power Plant Emissions in Southeast Asia”

Pollution killing more people than war and violence, says report

DW_Pollution kills more people each year than wars, disasters and hunger, also causing huge economic damage, a study says. Almost half the total deaths occur in just two countries.

China Smog in Shenyang (picture-alliance/dpa/Imagechine/J. Xu)

Environmental pollution is killing more people every year than smoking, hunger or natural disasters, according to a major study released in The Lancet medical journal on Thursday.

One in every six premature deaths worldwide in 2015, could be attributed to diseases caused by toxins in air or water, the study says. Tiếp tục đọc “Pollution killing more people than war and violence, says report”

Air quality getting worse as legal loopholes still exists

Last update 14:17 | 11/10/2017
VietNamNet Bridge – The air pollution in Vietnam is increasing in urban areas and industrial zones, mostly due to legal loopholes. vietnam economy, business news, vn news, vietnamnet bridge, english news, Vietnam news, news Vietnam, vietnamnet news, vn news, Vietnam net news, Vietnam latest news, Vietnam breaking news, air pollution, MONRE, Hanoi

The air quality measured at different monitoring stations in Hanoi and HCMC has been continuously ‘unhealthy’.

At 8am on October 6, the air quality index (AQI) measured at the US Embassy area in Hanoi was 126, meaning it is ‘unhealthy for sensitive groups’. Tiếp tục đọc “Air quality getting worse as legal loopholes still exists”

Hy vọng cho Hà Nội? Hệ thống xe buýt mới có thể giảm ô nhiễm…nếu có đủ người sử dụng

English: Hope for Hanoi? New bus system could cut pollution … if enough people use it

Từ toà nhà cao ốc văn phòng tại Hà Nội, anh Trần Dũng hầu như không thể nhìn thấy đường chân trời của thành phố đằng sau lớp khói bụi dày đặc. Trước khi rời công sở, anh chuyên viên trợ lý này kiểm tra phần ứng dụng AirVisual để đọc mức ô nhiễm không khí, ứng dụng cung cấp số đo chỉ số PM2.5 tại thời gian thực – PM2.5 là các hạt bụi nhỏ li ti có trong khói bụi mà có thể huỷ hoại cổ họng và phổi của con người.

Traffic jam in Hanoi

Những hàng dài xe máy và ô tô là nguyên nhân chính gây ô nhiễm không khí ở Hà Nội

Chỉ số PM2.5 thường dao động từ 100 đến 200 microgram mỗi mét khối – mức độ này thường được xếp vào loại “không tốt cho sức khoẻ” mà được toàn cầu đã công nghận. Nhưng vào ngày 19/12 năm rồi, nó đạt đến “mức độ  nguy hiểm” ở mức 343 microgram/m3, cao hơn cả ở Bắc Kinh.

Bị sốc khi đọc được con số này, anh Dũng đã chia sẻ ảnh chụp màn hình với bạn bè trên Facebook, anh viết: “Tôi không thể tin vào mắt mình. Các bạn bảo trọng!” Tiếp tục đọc “Hy vọng cho Hà Nội? Hệ thống xe buýt mới có thể giảm ô nhiễm…nếu có đủ người sử dụng”

Hope for Hanoi? New bus system could cut pollution … if enough people use it

A new $53m BRT (bus rapid transit) system has the power to reduce Hanoi’s dreadful air pollution. Persuading residents of Vietnam’s rapidly expanding capital to ditch their motorbikes and private cars, however, will be another story

Traffic jam in Hanoi
The swarm of motorbikes and cars is the main cause of Hanoi’s air pollution. Photograph: Linh Pham/Getty Images

From his high-rise office building in Hanoi, Tran Dung can barely see his city’s skyline behind the thick layer of smog. Before leaving work, the 25-year-old executive assistant checks the pollution reading on his AirVisual app, which provides real-time measurements of PM2.5 – the tiny particles found in smog that can damage your throat and lungs.

Hanoi’s PM2.5 levels typically range from 100 to 200 micrograms per cubic metre – regularly within the globally acknowledged “unhealthy” category. But on 19 December last year, they hit “hazardous levels” at 343μg/m3, which was higher than Beijing. Tiếp tục đọc “Hope for Hanoi? New bus system could cut pollution … if enough people use it”

‘We had to sue’: the five lawyers taking on China’s authorities over smog

In an unprecedented legal case, a group of Chinese lawyers have charged the governments of Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei with failing to protect their citizens from air pollution, which is linked to a third of all deaths in the country

Pinterest
Airpocalypse now: time-lapse video of smog posted by Beijing-based Briton Chas Pope on 1 January this year

Who is responsible for China’s chronic and deadly air pollution? That depends on who you ask. Officials blame the weather or outdoor barbecues, activists blame steel companies and coal-fired power plants. But Yu Wensheng blames only one actor: the government.

The 50-year-old lawyer recently launched an unprecedented suit against the authorities in three regions in China, claiming they have failed in their responsibilities. For a government with the motto “Serve the People”, Yu feels the officials are serving other interests by allowing nearly half a billion people to choke on toxic smog. Tiếp tục đọc “‘We had to sue’: the five lawyers taking on China’s authorities over smog”

Energy and Air Pollution 2016 – World Energy Outlook Special Report

World Energy Outlook: Released on 27 June 2016

Full reportAcknowledgements | Table of Contents

Executive Summaries
Chinese | English | French

‌‌• Around 6.5 million premature deaths each year can be attributed to air pollution
• Energy production and use are by far the largest man-made sources of air pollutants
• Technologies to tackle air pollution are well known

Clean air is vital for good health. Yet despite growing recognition of this imperative, the problem of air pollution is far from solved in many countries, and the global health impacts risk intensifying in the decades to come.

The scale of the public health crisis caused by air pollution and the importance of the energy sector to its resolution are the reasons why the IEA is focusing on this critical topic for the first time.

Based on new data for pollutant emissions in 2015 and projections to 2040, this special report, the latest in the World Energy Outlook series, provides a global outlook for energy and air pollution as well as detailed profiles of key countries and regions: the United States, Mexico, the European Union, China, India, Southeast Asia and Africa.

In a Clean Air Scenario, the report proposes a pragmatic and attainable strategy to reconcile the world’s energy requirements with its need for cleaner air. Alongside the multiple benefits to human health, this strategy shows that resolving the world’s air pollution problem can go hand-in-hand with progress towards other environmental and development goals.

See related material

‌• Press release
Presentation to the press