Ikea plans mushroom-based packaging as eco-friendly replacement for polystyrene

telegraph.co.uk

Swedish retail giant looks at biodegradable fungus-based packaging to replace polystyrene, which is tricky to recycle

Instantly recognisable: Ikea

Furniture giant Ikea is considering packaging some of its products with fungi. Photo: REX FEATURES

Ikea plans to use packaging made with mushrooms as an eco-friendly replacement for polystyrene, the Swedish retail giant has revealed.

The flat-pack furniture retailer is looking at using the biodegradable “fungi packaging” as part of its efforts to reduce waste and increase recycling, Joanna Yarrow, head of sustainability for Ikea in the UK said.
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10 Rivers Contribute Most of the Plastic in the Oceans

ScientificAmerica

The 10 rivers that carry 93 percent of that trash are the Yangtze, Yellow, Hai, Pearl, Amur, Mekong, Indus and Ganges Delta in Asia, and the Niger and Nile in Africa. The Yangtze alone dumps up to an estimated 1.5 million metric tons of plastic waste into the Yellow Sea.

 

Credit: Amanda Montañez; Source: “Export of Plastic Debris by Rivers into the Sea,” by Christian Schmidt et al., in Environmental Science & Technology, Vol. 51, No. 21; November 7, 2017

Our seas are choking on plastic. A staggering eight million metric tons wind up in oceans every year, and unraveling exactly how it gets there is critical. A recent study estimates that more than a quarter of all that waste could be pouring in from just 10 rivers, eight of them in Asia.

“Rivers carry trash over long distances and connect nearly all land surfaces with the oceans,” making them a major battleground in the fight against sea pollution, explains Christian Schmidt, a hydrogeologist at the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research in Leipzig, Germany.
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Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottles

Theguardian

The breakthrough, spurred by the discovery of plastic-eating bugs at a Japanese dump, could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis

 Scientists explain how plastic-eating enzyme can help fight pollution – video

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International partners join Việt Nam to combat plastic pollution

Update: June, 04/2018 – 16:30

Trash are seen along the coast in the south of Phước Diêm Commune, Thuận Nam District in central province of Ninh Thuận. — VNA/VNS Photo
Viet Nam News HÀ NỘI — Dozens of embassies and international organisations marked the World Environment Day (June 5) by signing a Code of Conduct on Combating Plastic Pollution.

The signatories include Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, the European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Slovakia, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States of America as well as 16 UN agencies, funds, programmes, offices and World Bank. Tiếp tục đọc “International partners join Việt Nam to combat plastic pollution”

How can development cooperation address ocean plastic pollution?

23 January 2018

In the first weeks of 2018 there were (for me) unexpected announcements from both the EU and the UK Government on the urgent global issue of ocean plastic pollution. The EU intends to make all plastic packaging on the European market recyclable by 2030 and in her speech announcing the UK’s 25 Year Environment Plan, Prime Minister Theresa May committed the UK to eliminating all “avoidable plastic waste” by 2042. The Prime Minister also said it would direct UK aid to help developing nations reduce plastic waste, which could indicate a new direction for the UK’s and other countries’ aid programmes.

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Toxic timebomb: why we must fight back against the world’s plague of plastic

We must reduce our dependence on plastics, especially single-use items, and seek out alternative materials

38 million pieces of plastic waste found on uninhabited South Pacific island

It’s everywhere. From the Mariana Trench to the floor of the Arctic Ocean, on tropical beaches and polar coasts. It’s in wildlife, seafood, sea salt and even on the surface of Mars. The world is blighted by plastic. Up to 12m tonnes of the stuff enters the world’s oceans every year (that’s one new tonne of plastic every three to 10 seconds) and it doesn’t go to that magical place called “away”.

Once in the oceans, it can float around for years, or even decades, before being swallowed by a bird or a whale. During that time, it can travel tens of thousands of kilometres, all the while absorbing contaminants from the sea water, concentrating them like a sponge. When wildlife ingest plastic, the brew of toxic chemicals can be transferred to the animal’s tissues with potentially dangerous consequences. Tiếp tục đọc “Toxic timebomb: why we must fight back against the world’s plague of plastic”

ASEAN Could Take Lead on Plastic Crisis in Asia

Asia Foundation

April 19, 2017

By John J. Brandon

April 22 marks Earth Day around the globe. I was in 8th grade when Earth Day was first commemorated in 1970, and to mark the day, I participated in annual trash clean-up events at my school. At that time, my world was pretty much the town where I grew up in New Jersey and I didn’t think very much about the rest of the world, I just wanted my neighborhood to be clean. But eight years later, my world expanded when I went to live and work in Bangkok. I vividly remember being struck by the amount of plastic bags, bottles, and wrapping on the streets and in the city’s once-many canals. Now, after four decades of traveling in Southeast Asia, I have witnessed the plague of the plastic bag across pretty much every major city in the region.

Manila Bay garbage

A polluted Manila Bay. It is estimated that some plastic products take more than 400 years to decompose, especially in deep waters. Photo/Flickr user Adam Cohn

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How Can We Create a World Where Plastic Never Becomes Waste?

01/23/2016 09:00 am ET | Updated 4 days ago

Christophe Launay via Getty Images

huffingtonpost -Today nearly everyone, everywhere, every day, comes into contact with plastics. Plastics have become the ubiquitous workhorse material of the modern economy — combining unrivalled functional properties with low cost. And yet, while delivering many benefits, the current plastics economy has drawbacks that are becoming more apparent by the day.

Significant economic value is lost after each use, along with wide-ranging negative impacts to natural systems. How can we turn the challenges of our current plastics economy into a global opportunity for innovation and value capture, resulting in stronger economies and better environmental outcomes? Tiếp tục đọc “How Can We Create a World Where Plastic Never Becomes Waste?”