Thiệt hại hàng nghìn tỷ do suy giảm nguồn nước sông Mê Công

Thứ Ba, 07-09-2021, 18:53Lưu vực sông Mekong. (Ảnh: Duy Khương/TTXVN)

NDSố lượng nước sông Mê Công từ thượng nguồn về đồng bằng sông Cửu Long năm 2020 giảm 157 tỷ m3 so với năm 2011. Lượng phù sa bùn cát năm cũng giảm tương ứng 14 triệu tấn so với năm 2017…

Trong khuôn khổ Đại hội Tổ chức các cơ quan Kiểm toán tối cao châu Á (ASOSAI) 15 diễn ra ngày từ ngày 6 đến 8/9 theo hình thức trực tuyến, Kiểm toán Nhà nước Việt Nam đã trình bày, chia sẻ báo cáo kết quả kiểm toán việc quản lý nguồn nước lưu vực sông Mê Công gắn với việc thực hiện mục tiêu phát triển bền vững.

Đây là một trong những nội dung quan trọng của Tuyên bố Hà Nội – sáng kiến được Việt Nam đề xuất với vai trò Chủ tịch Tổ chức các cơ quan Kiểm toán tối cao châu Á (ASOSAI) nhiệm kỳ 2018-2021 (Đại hội ASOSAI 14).

Tiếp tục đọc “Thiệt hại hàng nghìn tỷ do suy giảm nguồn nước sông Mê Công”

Geopolitics plays out on the Mekong with doubts on dams and promises of cooperation

 

aseantoday.com

The geopolitics of the Mekong river continue to evolve, with key announcements from China, Thailand and the Mekong River Commission.

Editorial

Recent weeks have seen new developments in the ongoing tension over the Mekong river and its waters, as the river basin faces ecological crises and its waters play an ever-larger role in geopolitics.

Thailand has announced that it is reconsidering its decision to purchase power from the planned Sanakham Dam, a large hydropower project on the mainstream of the Mekong in Laos. Tiếp tục đọc “Geopolitics plays out on the Mekong with doubts on dams and promises of cooperation”

The Mekong-U.S. Partnership: The Mekong Region Deserves Good Partners

The launch of the Mekong-U.S. Partnership reflects the importance of the Mekong region to the United States. Our relationship with Mekong partner countries is an integral part of our Indo-Pacific vision and our strategic partnership with ASEAN. With more than $150 million in initial investments in regional programs, we will build on the good work of the Lower Mekong Initiative and the $3.5 billion in regional U.S. assistance during the last eleven years. Tiếp tục đọc “The Mekong-U.S. Partnership: The Mekong Region Deserves Good Partners”

Mekong countries and the UN join forces to fight drug scourge

Ministers on Friday agreed to regularly share intelligence and carry out more coordinated anti-trafficking operations.

Too little, too late for US ‘recommitment’ to Mekong countries? China’s already there

scmp

  • As Beijing floods the Mekong with much-needed cash, the US finds itself pushing back against the tide to retain influence
  • But some nations in the region think the competition can work to their advantage
The Greater Mekong Subregion is a 2.6 million sq km area that covers five Asean countries as well as China’s Guangxi region and Yunnan province. Photo: AFP
The Greater Mekong Subregion is a 2.6 million sq km area that covers five Asean countries as well as China’s Guangxi region and Yunnan province. Photo: AFP

US officials say Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will “recommit” the United States to supporting the five countries along Southeast Asia’s longest river, the Mekong, when he makes his first duty visit to Bangkok in July. Tiếp tục đọc “Too little, too late for US ‘recommitment’ to Mekong countries? China’s already there”

When you eat a Mekong Giant Catfish, you are paying criminals

By Marc Goichot   July 25, 2018 | 09:39 am GMT+7

When you eat a Mekong Giant Catfish, you are paying criminals

Cambodia Fisheries personnel release a Mekong giant catfish. Photo by Reuters

Vietnamese restaurant owners, chefs and customers are complicit in the crime of catching, advertising, serving and eating an endangered species.

Most people in Vietnam knows it is illegal to sell tiger meat or pangolin scales or rhino horn.

It is common knowledge that trading elephant ivory is a criminal offense, punishable by fines and jail time. But few of us seem to know that it is just as illegal to sell a Mekong Giant Catfish or Giant Barb.

But it is. Every restaurant advertising these endangered giants is breaking the law. Every time you eat a plate of Mekong Giant Catfish in Hanoi or Da Nang or Ho Chi Minh City, you are helping a criminal. In fact, you are paying a criminal.

And you are also helping to drive this extraordinary species toward extinction.

Instead of choosing one of these dishes from the menu, you should choose to contact the Provincial Department of Fisheries. The government and Vietnamese people have taken significant steps in recent years to tackle wildlife crime and trafficking of species like tigers, elephants and rhinos. It is time we ended the illegal trade in the Mekong’s most magnificent fish.

Tiếp tục đọc “When you eat a Mekong Giant Catfish, you are paying criminals”

Critically Endangered Giant Fish on Menu at Luxury Restaurants

FROM THE OUTSIDE Nha Hang Lang Nghe, in Danang, looks like any other respectable restaurant in Vietnam. Tables are invitingly laid out in the shade of a lush garden, and festive traditional art lines attractive brick walls. Families laugh over hot pots, and businessmen clink glasses.

Yet the veneer of wholesome normality masks a dark truth: Critically endangered giant river fish are Lang Nghe’s signature dish. Although it’s illegal to sell them in Vietnam, signs at the entryway entice diners with photos of imperiled Mekong giant catfish (“tasty meat, rich in omega-3”) and giant barbs (“good for men”), while a video showing a 436-pound giant catfish being cooked and eaten plays on a screen inside. Advertisements on social media likewise boast of the delightful flavor of the enormous fish, and of their rarity.
Tiếp tục đọc “Critically Endangered Giant Fish on Menu at Luxury Restaurants”

Letters from the Mekong: Mekong Power Shift – Emerging Trends in the GMS Power Sector

Report

This issue brief, the fourth in Stimson’s “Letters from the Mekong” series, explores the shifting terrain for power sector development in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS), analyzing hydropower within the context of a broader range of emerging factors and opportunities that could lead to a transformation in the way that Mekong countries approach energy security, regional electricity trade, and sustainable development. This transition, if effectively implemented, could lead to substantive economic gains and significantly reduce ecological, socioeconomic, and political risks in the Mekong Basin. Tiếp tục đọc “Letters from the Mekong: Mekong Power Shift – Emerging Trends in the GMS Power Sector”