Vietnam’s illegal ivory market continues to thrive, report finds

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New research measures impacts of China’s elephant ivory trade ban

by Mongabay.com on 23 October 2018

    • Research released last month by WWF and TRAFFIC, the wildlife monitoring network, found that there has been a substantial decline in the number of Chinese consumers buying ivory since the ivory trade ban went into effect on December 31, 2017. But there is still work to be done to diminish both the supply and demand for elephant ivory in China.
    • Of 2,000 Chinese consumers surveyed, 14 percent claimed to have bought ivory in the past year — significantly fewer than the 31 percent of respondents who said they’d recently purchased ivory during a pre-ban survey conducted in 2017. Some ivory sales have simply gone international, however: 18 percent of regular travelers reported buying ivory products while abroad, particularly in Thailand and Hong Kong.
    • TRAFFIC reports that all of the formerly accredited (i.e. legal) ivory shops the group’s investigators visited in 2018 have stopped selling ivory. But the illegal ivory trade has not been so thoroughly shut down. TRAFFIC investigators also visited 157 markets in 23 cities and found 2,812 ivory products on offer in 345 separate stores.

Continue reading “New research measures impacts of China’s elephant ivory trade ban”

Exclusive: Illegal Tiger Trade Fed by ‘Tiger Farms,’ New Evidence Reveals

National Geographic

A shocking video and new intelligence suggest that legal and illegal captive tiger facilities fuel Asia’s tiger trafficking—with brutal efficiency.

Fewer than 4,000 tigers remain in the wild, but more than 8,000 are held in captive facilities in Asia. Investigations have shown that many of these facilities breed and slaughter tigers for the illegal trade.

PHOTOGRAPH BY DARIO PIGNATELLI, GETT

IN THE LIVING room of a house at the end of a narrow country road in central Vietnam, a little way off the main highway, the skeleton of a tiger was laid out on the floor—the only complete one they had for sale, the man told the pair of visitors.

It was an attractive offer for someone looking to make tiger bone wine, a coveted brew made from bones soaked in rice wine, but what the visitors were interested in were the live tigers.
Continue reading “Exclusive: Illegal Tiger Trade Fed by ‘Tiger Farms,’ New Evidence Reveals”

Southeast Asia is in the grip of a biodiversity crisis

theconversation.com

Rich in wildlife, Southeast Asia includes at least six of the world’s 25 “biodiversity hotspots” – the areas of the world that contain an exceptional concentration of species, and are exceptionally endangered. The region contains 20% of the planet’s vertebrate and plant species and the world’s third-largest tropical forest.

In addition to this existing biodiversity, the region has an extraordinary rate of species discovery, with more than 2,216 new species describedbetween 1997 and 2014 alone.

Global comparisons are difficult but it seems the Mekong region has a higher rate of species discovery than other parts of the tropics, with hundreds of new species described annually.

Habitat loss

Southeast Asia’s biodiversity is under serious threat; some parts of the region are projected to lose up to 98% of their remaining forests in the next nine years. It’s also thought to be the world’s most threatened region for mammals. Continue reading “Southeast Asia is in the grip of a biodiversity crisis”

Critically Endangered Giant Fish on Menu at Luxury Restaurants

FROM THE OUTSIDE Nha Hang Lang Nghe, in Danang, looks like any other respectable restaurant in Vietnam. Tables are invitingly laid out in the shade of a lush garden, and festive traditional art lines attractive brick walls. Families laugh over hot pots, and businessmen clink glasses.

Yet the veneer of wholesome normality masks a dark truth: Critically endangered giant river fish are Lang Nghe’s signature dish. Although it’s illegal to sell them in Vietnam, signs at the entryway entice diners with photos of imperiled Mekong giant catfish (“tasty meat, rich in omega-3”) and giant barbs (“good for men”), while a video showing a 436-pound giant catfish being cooked and eaten plays on a screen inside. Advertisements on social media likewise boast of the delightful flavor of the enormous fish, and of their rarity.
Continue reading “Critically Endangered Giant Fish on Menu at Luxury Restaurants”

Hanoi statement to fight illegal wildlife trade under review

Last update 17:28 | 31/05/2018

The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and the UK Embassy in Vietnam held a bilateral meeting and announced the one-year review of implementing the Hanoi Statement on Illegal Wildlife Trade in Hanoi on May 31.

Hanoi statement to fight illegal wildlife trade under review, social news, vietnamnet bridge, english news, Vietnam news, news Vietnam, vietnamnet news, Vietnam net news, Vietnam latest news, vn news, Vietnam breaking news

The report was built by the ministry based on the commitments of 25 countries and international organisations at the Hanoi Conference on Illegal Wildlife Trade in 2016.

The UK will host an international conference about illegal wildlife this October. Continue reading “Hanoi statement to fight illegal wildlife trade under review”

Using artificial intelligence to investigate illegal wildlife trade on social media

Sciencedaily.com

Date:March 12, 2018 Source:University of Helsinki

FULL STORY

These are Southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum) in an undisclosed protected area in South Africa.
Credit: Enrico Di Minin

Illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation and is currently expanding to social media. This is a worrisome trend, given the ease of access and popularity of social media. Efficient monitoring of illegal wildlife trade on social media is therefore crucial for conserving biodiversity.

In a new article published in the journal Conservation Biology, scientists from the University of Helsinki, Digital Geography Lab, argue that methods from artificial intelligence can be used to help monitor the illegal wildlife trade on social media. Continue reading “Using artificial intelligence to investigate illegal wildlife trade on social media”

Corruption fueling deforestation in Cambodia: poachers and corrupt officials profit from the black market trade, being exported to Vietnam — and beyond.

>> Bài liên quan: Quan chức tham nhũng Việt Nam kiếm tiền từ gỗ buôn lậu ở Campuchia

DW

Cambodia’s forests are being felled at a shocking rate, as poachers and corrupt officials profit from the black market trade in rare wood species, which is being exported to Vietnam — and beyond.

Two tractors transporting timber in Aoral Wildlife Sanctuary, Cambodia
 (Pascal Laureyn )

The Aoral Wildlife Sanctuary in Kampong Speu province is just a three-hour drive from Cambodia’s capital, Phnom Penh. But the scenery here couldn’t be more different than in the sprawling metropolis — even a military outpost in the reserve is peaceful and picturesque. A traditional stilt house has hammocks, chickens and ice-cold beer. Outside, a few soldiers are playing pétanque as a black pig snuffles the earth.

But behind this idyllic scene in the Cardamom Mountains, a billion-dollar black market is thriving. Continue reading “Corruption fueling deforestation in Cambodia: poachers and corrupt officials profit from the black market trade, being exported to Vietnam — and beyond.”

The crime family at the centre of Asia’s animal trafficking network

theguardian

Bach brothers based in Vietnam and Thailand are responsible for smuggling thousands of tonnes of elephant ivory, rhino horn and other endangered species

Bach Mai aka ‘Boonchai’ (left) and his brother Bach Van Limh are key players who control the smuggling gateway from Thailand into Laos.
 Bach Mai aka ‘Boonchai’ (left) and his brother Bach Van Limh are key players who control the smuggling gateway from Thailand into Laos.

There is a simple reason why there is always trouble in Nakhon Phanom. It is the reason why the US air force came here during the Vietnam war, and the reason why this dull and dusty town in north-east Thailand now serves as a primary gateway on the global animal trafficking highway. It is all to do with Continue reading “The crime family at the centre of Asia’s animal trafficking network”

Wild animals traded via agriculture export to China

Last update 16:42 | 23/11/2017

Wild animals and their parts have been found hidden among agricultural products exported to China according to a recent report from Ministry of Finance to the government.

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Police seize a large number of ivory imported to Vietnam

The illegal trading of wild animals which mostly come from Africa is carried out by air and waterways through Laos, Cambodia to Vietnam, and then by road from Vietnam to China, the report said.

“The smugglers often hide the frozen animals or animal parts including ivory, tiger bones, or rhino horn among agricultural products being exported to China through border gates or open roads between the two countries Continue reading “Wild animals traded via agriculture export to China”

WWF report: Vietnamese, Chinese tourists blamed for wildlife trafficking

Update: November, 03/2017 – 10:30 vietnamnews

HÀ NỘI — A major driver of the illegal wildlife trade in the Golden Triangle – the border area where Thailand, Laos and Myanmar – is tourists from Việt Nam and China.

This was one of the conclusions of a report released on Thursday by the World Wildlife Fund to highlight ten of the Most Widely Traded Endangered Species in the markets of the Golden Triangle.

The tourists are believed to travel to areas such as MongLa and Tachilek in Myanmar, and border areas such as Boten and the Golden Triangle Special Economic Zone in Laos. Continue reading “WWF report: Vietnamese, Chinese tourists blamed for wildlife trafficking”