Human Rights NGOs: “Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?”

Council on Foreign Ralations, Pressure Points June 20, 2022

by Elliott Abrams

How much reliance should be placed on the major international human rights NGOs? Can they be trusted to work without bias? How are they governed?

These are subjects I discussed recently in a short paper done for the Council on Foreign Relations’ Diamonstein-Spielvogel Project on the Future of Democracy. It is entitled Human Rights NGOs: “Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?” and can be found here.
Tiếp tục đọc “Human Rights NGOs: “Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?””

Sahel (Africa) violence could drive more refugees toward Europe

FILE- In this April 15, 2022 file photo, malnourished children wait for treatment in the pediatric department of Boulmiougou hospital in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. The U.N. is warning that 18 million people in Africa’s Sahel region face severe hunger in the next three months. Two U.N. agencies are citing the impacts of war in Ukraine, the coronavirus pandemic, climate-induced shocks and rising costs – and warning that people may try to migrate out of the affected areas. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia, File)

GENEVA (AP) — The head of the U.N. refugee agency says “Europe should be much more worried” that more people from Africa’s Sahel region could seek to move north to escape violence, climate crises like droughts and floods and the impact of growing food shortages caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.Filippo Grandi, the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, called for more efforts to build peace in the world as conflicts and crises like those in Ukraine, Venezuela, Myanmar, Syria and beyond have driven over 100 million people to leave their homes — both within their own countries and abroad.

UNHCR, the U.N.’s refugee agency, on Thursday issued its latest “Global Trends” report, which found over 89 million people had been displaced by conflict, climate change, violence and human rights abuses by 2021. The figure has since swelled after at least 12 million people fled their homes in Ukraine to other parts of the country or abroad following Russia’s Feb. 24 invasion.

This year, the world is also facing growing food insecurity — Ukraine is a key European breadbasket and the war has greatly hurt grain exports

The African Union, whose continent relies on imports of wheat and other food from Ukraine, has appealed for help to access grain that is blocked in Ukrainian silos and unable to leave Ukrainian ports amid a Russian naval blockade in the Black Sea.

PODCAST – Asia Stream: The Philippine Election — Dynasty and Disinformation

nikkeiNearly 50 years after Ferdinand Marcos Sr. declared brutal martial law, the Philippines is poised to elect his son. Has history been forgotten?

Nikkei staff writersMay 7, 2022 03:26 JST

NEW YORK — Welcome to Nikkei Asia’s podcast: Asia Stream.

Every week, Asia Stream tracks and analyzes the Indo-Pacific with a mix of expert interviews and original reporting by our correspondents from across the globe.

New episodes are recorded biweekly and available on Apple PodcastsSpotify and all other major platforms, and on our YouTube channel.

This week, we focus on one of Asia’s most dynamic but flawed democracies: the Philippines. With the election just days away, we get under the hood of the electoral system and investigate the powerful role that dynasties play in the country, with a special focus on Ferdinand Marcos Jr., the front-runner on the cusp of taking power. We then take into account that other essential, if dangerous, tenet of modern Philippine democracy: disinformation, and how it is being used to gain support among the country’s most vulnerable populations.

Tiếp tục đọc “PODCAST – Asia Stream: The Philippine Election — Dynasty and Disinformation”

The Xinjiang Police Files Should Prompt Action Against Uyghur Genocide

Olivia Enos , Contributor

I write about international human rights and national security.Follow

May 31, 2022,10:54am EDT Forbe

Listen to article 4 minutes

20180523125453301_653121197205
Photo of Hawagul Tewekkul, a 46-year-old Uyghur preliminarily sentenced to time in a political … [+] VICTIMS OF COMMUNISM MEMORIAL FOUNDATION’S XINJIANG POLICE FILES

Looking through the photos of the 2,884 inmates in the Xinjiang Police Files is not for the faint of heart. You scroll – as you would on Instagram – past face after face of a people unjustly detained by the Chinese government for no other reason than that they are Uyghur.

The first thing I noticed in the photos were their eyes. Some look bewildered, others determined, others tear-filled, others entirely blank.

Tiếp tục đọc “The Xinjiang Police Files Should Prompt Action Against Uyghur Genocide”

Airline apologizes for tweet poking fun at Thailand’s King

An April Fool’s tweet referenced the apparently volatile relationship between King Vajiralongkorn and his consort Sineenat Wongvajirapakdi.

By Sebastian Strangio

thediplomat – April 04, 2022

Airline Apologizes for Tweet Poking Fun at Thailand’s King
A VietJet Air Airbus A320(SL) departs from Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on September 18, 2017.Credit: Flickr/Alec Wilson

The low-cost carrier Thai VietJet Air has been forced to make a public apology after an April Fool’s tweet prompted a flood of criticism in Thailand, one of its major markets, for making fun of Thailand’s King Vajiralongkorn. The post described the creation of a fake new route between the city of Nan in northern Thailand and Munich, Germany, where the king has for many years spent considerable amounts of time.

Tiếp tục đọc “Airline apologizes for tweet poking fun at Thailand’s King”

Is it time to call Putin’s war in Ukraine genocide?

In international law, genocide has nothing explicitly to do with the enormity of criminal acts but, rather, of criminal intent.

By Philip Gourevitch

newyorker – March 13, 2022

People gather around two graves covered in flowers and two large crosses.
The larger reality is that the world has never before been confronted by a genocidal war waged by a man brandishing nuclear weapons.P hotograph by Dan Kitwood / Getty

“We have to call this what it is,” Volodymyr Zelensky said, late last month, a few days after Vladimir Putin had ordered the invasion and conquest of Ukraine. “Russia’s criminal actions against Ukraine show signs of genocide.” President Zelensky, who lost family members during the Holocaust, and who also happens to have a law degree, sounded suitably cautious about invoking genocide, and he called for the International Criminal Court in The Hague to send war-crimes investigators as a first step. But such investigations take years, and rarely result in convictions. (Since the I.C.C. was established in 1998, it has indicted only Africans; and Russia, like the United States, refuses its jurisdiction.) The only court that Zelensky can make his case in for now is the court of global public opinion, where his instincts, drawing on deep wells of courage and conviction, have been unerring. And by the end of the invasion’s second week—with Putin’s indiscriminate bombardment of civilian targets intensifying, and the death toll mounting rapidly; with more than two and a half million Ukrainians having fled the country, and millions more under relentless attack in besieged cities and towns; and with no end in sight—Zelensky no longer deferred to outside experts to describe what Ukrainians face in the most absolute terms. “I will appeal directly to the nations of the world if the leaders of the world do not make every effort to stop this war,” he said in a video message on Tuesday. He paused, and looking directly into the camera, added, “This genocide.”

Tiếp tục đọc “Is it time to call Putin’s war in Ukraine genocide?”

International law : Crime of Genocide — Luật quốc tế: Hình tội diệt chủng

Genocide was first recognised as a crime under international law in 1946 by the United Nations General Assembly (A/RES/96-I). It was codified as an independent crime in the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (the Genocide Convention). The Convention has been ratified by 149 States (as of January 2018). The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has repeatedly stated that the Convention embodies principles that are part of general customary international law. This means that whether or not States have ratified the Genocide Convention, they are all bound as a matter of law by the principle that genocide is a crime prohibited under international law. The ICJ has also stated that the prohibition of genocide is a peremptory norm of international law (or ius cogens) and consequently, no derogation from it is allowed.

The definition of the crime of genocide as contained in Article II of the Genocide Convention was the result of a negotiating process and reflects the compromise reached among United Nations Member States in 1948 at the time of drafting the Convention. Genocide is defined in the same terms as in the Genocide Convention in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Article 6), as well as in the statutes of other international and hybrid jurisdictions. Many States have also criminalized genocide in their domestic law; others have yet to do so. 

(Note: The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is the law that established the  ICC)

Definition

Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide


(Rome Statue of International Court, Part II, Art. 6)



Article II

In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

  • Killing members of the group;
  • Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
  • Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
  • Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
  • Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.
Elements of the crime

The Genocide Convention establishes in Article I that the crime of genocide may take place in the context of an armed conflict, international or non-international, but also in the context of a peaceful situation. The latter is less common but still possible. The same article establishes the obligation of the contracting parties to prevent and to punish the crime of genocide.

The popular understanding of what constitutes genocide tends to be broader than the content of the norm under international law. Article II of the Genocide Convention contains a narrow definition of the crime of genocide, which includes two main elements:

A mental element: the “intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such”; and

A physical element, which includes the following five acts, enumerated exhaustively:
  • Killing members of the group;
  • Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
  • Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
  • Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
  • Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

The intent is the most difficult element to determine. To constitute genocide, there must be a proven intent on the part of perpetrators to physically destroy a national, ethnical, racial or religious group. Cultural destruction does not suffice, nor does an intention to simply disperse a group. It is this special intent, or dolus specialis, that makes the crime of genocide so unique. In addition, case law has associated intent with the existence of a State or organizational plan or policy, even if the definition of genocide in international law does not include that element.

Importantly, the victims of genocide are deliberately targeted – not randomly – because of their real or perceived membership of one of the four groups protected under the Convention (which excludes political groups, for example). This means that the target of destruction must be the group, as such, and not its members as individuals. Genocide can also be committed against only a part of the group, as long as that part is identifiable (including within a geographically limited area) and “substantial.”

Nguồn Genocide >>

Diệt chủng được Đại hội đồng Liên hợp quốc công nhận lần đầu tiên là hình tội theo luật quốc tế vào năm 1946 (A/RES/96-I). Diệt chủng được đưa vào hệ thống luật như hình tội độc lập trong Công ước Ngăn ngừa và Trừng phạt Tội Diệt chủng (Công ước Diệt chủng) năm 1948. Công ước được 149 Quốc gia phê chuẩn (tính đến tháng 1 năm 2018). Tòa Công lý Quốc tế (ICJ) đã nhiều lần tuyên bố Công ước là hiện thân của các nguyên tắc đã là một phần của luật tục quốc tế chung. Điều này nghĩa là dù các Quốc gia có phê chuẩn Công ước Diệt chủng hay không, thì tất cả các Quốc gia đều bị ràng buộc về mặt pháp lý bởi nguyên tắc diệt chủng là hình tội bị cấm theo luật quốc tế truyền thống. Tòa Công lý Quốc tế cũng tuyên bố cấm diệt chủng là quy tắc bắt buộc của luật pháp quốc tế (gọi là jus cogens) và do đó, không được phép làm yếu tội diệt chủng.

Định nghĩa tội diệt chủng được nêu trong Điều II của Công ước Diệt chủng là kết quả của quá trình thương lượng và phản ánh sự thỏa hiệp đã đạt được giữa các Quốc gia Thành viên Liên hợp quốc vào năm 1948 tại thời điểm soạn thảo Công ước. Diệt chủng cũng được định nghĩa trong Đạo luật Rome về Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế (ở Điều 6) với từ ngữ tương tự như định nghĩa trong Công ước Diệt chủng, cũng như trong các đạo luật của các thẩm quyền quốc tế và thẩm quyền hỗn hợp khác. Nhiều Quốc gia cũng hình sự hóa diệt chủng trong luật trong nước của họ; một số Quốc gia khác thì chưa làm như vậy.

(Chú thích: Đạo luật Rome về Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế (ICC) là đạo luật thiết lập Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế)

Định nghĩa

Công ước về Ngăn ngừa và Trừng phạt Tội diệt chủng

(Đạo luật Rome về Tòa Hình sự Quốc Tế, Phần II, Điều 6)

Điều II

Trong Công ước này, diệt chủng nghĩa là bất kỳ hành vi nào sau đây được thực hiện với chủ ý tiêu diệt, toàn bộ hoặc một phần, của một nhóm quốc gia, dân tộc, chủng tộc hoặc tôn giáo, như:
  • Giết các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Gây hại nghiêm trọng về thể xác hoặc tinh thần cho các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Cố ý gây ra cho nhóm các điều kiện sống được tính toán để dẫn đến hủy diệt toàn bộ hoặc một phần thể chất của nhóm;
  • Áp đặt các biện pháp có chủ ý ngăn cản sinh đẻ trong nhóm;
  • Ép chuyển trẻ em thuộc nhóm này sang nhóm khác.
Các yếu tố cấu thành tội diệt chủng

Công ước Diệt chủng quy định tại Điều I rằng tội diệt chủng có thể diễn ra trong bối cảnh xung đột vũ trang, ở trong nước hoặc ở các nước với nhau, nhưng cũng có thể diễn ra trong bối cảnh hòa bình. Bối cảnh hòa bình ít phổ biến hơn nhưng vẫn có thể xảy ra. Điều I này cũng thiết lập nghĩa vụ ngăn ngừa và trừng phạt tội diệt chủng của các nước ký Công ước.

Cách hiểu phổ thông về những gì cấu thành tội diệt chủng có khuynh hướng rộng hơn điều khoản luật theo luật quốc tế. Điều II của Công ước Diệt chủng có định nghĩa tội diệt chủng hẹp hơn, gồm hai yếu tố chính:

Yếu tố ý định: “chủ ý tiêu diệt, toàn bộ hoặc một phần, của một nhóm quốc gia, dân tộc, chủng tộc hoặc tôn giáo”; và

Yếu tố thể chất, gồm 5 hành vi sau đây, được liệt kê đầy đủ:
  • Giết các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Gây hại nghiêm trọng về thể xác hoặc tinh thần cho các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Cố ý gây ra cho nhóm các điều kiện sống được tính toán để dẫn đến hủy diệt toàn bộ hoặc một phần thể chất của nhóm;
  • Áp đặt các biện pháp có chủ ý ngăn cản sinh đẻ trong nhóm;
  • Ép chuyển trẻ em thuộc nhóm này sang nhóm khác.

Chủ ý là yếu tố khó xác định nhất. Để cấu thành tội diệt chủng, phải chứng minh người thủ phạm có chủ ý tiêu diệt thân thể một nhóm quốc gia, dân tộc, chủng tộc hoặc tôn giáo. Hủy diệt văn hóa thì không đủ để cấu thành tội diệt chủng. Chủ ý chỉ phân tán nhóm (không cho nhóm sống tập trung với nhau) cũng không đủ để  cấu thành tội diệt chủng.  Đây là  chủ ý đặc biệt, tiếng Latinh là dolus specialis,  và chủ ý đặc biệt này làm cho tội diệt chủng trở thành khác thường. Thêm vào đó, án lệ thường xem những kế hoạch  hoặc chính sách diệt chủng của Nhà nước hoặc của một tổ chức là bằng chứng chủ ý diệt chủng, dù rằng  định nghĩa diệt chủng trong luật quốc tế không nói đến kế hoạch và chính sách.

Điều quan trọng là, các nạn nhân diệt chủng bị cố ý nhắm vào – không phải là vô tình  – vì họ là thành viên thực sự hay bị hiểu nhầm là thành viên  của một trong bốn nhóm được bảo vệ theo Công ước (các nhóm khác, ví dụ nhóm chính trị, thì không được bảo vệ).  Điều này có nghĩa là mục tiêu bị hủy diệt phải là một nhóm, chứ không phải là các thành viên với tư cách cá nhân. Diệt chủng cũng có thể nhắm vào chỉ một phần của nhóm, không hẳn là toàn bộ nhóm, miễn là phần đó có thể nhận dạng (kể cả phần đó nằm trong khu vực địa lý giới hạn) và diệt chủng “với số lượng người đáng kể”, không phải là làm hại vài người lẻ tẻ.

(Phạm Thu Hương dịch và chú thích)

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Chuỗi bài:

The Struggle for Myanmar – Podcast

Is Myanmar heading into civil war — or already there?

Nikkei – Nikkei staff writers – February 5, 2022 09:29 JST

NEW YORK — Welcome to Nikkei Asia’s podcast: Asia Stream.

Every week, Asia Stream tracks and analyzes the Indo-Pacific with a mix of interviews and reporting by our correspondents from across the globe.

New episodes are recorded weekly and available on Apple PodcastsSpotify and all other major platforms, and on our YouTube channel

LISTEN HERE

Tiếp tục đọc “The Struggle for Myanmar – Podcast”

The revolt against liberalism: what’s driving Poland and Hungary’s nativist turn? – podcast

For the hardline conservatives ruling Poland and Hungary, the transition from communism to liberal democracy was a mirage. They fervently believe a more decisive break with the past is needed to achieve national liberation. By Nicholas Mulder

theguardian

Written by Nicholas Mulder, read by Tanya Cubric and produced by Esther Opoku-Gyeni

Hungary’s prime minister Viktor Orbán at an electoral rally in April 2018.
Hungary’s prime minister Viktor Orbán at an electoral rally in April 2018. Photograph: Zsolt Szigetvary/EPA

Sat 21 Aug 2021 12.00 BST – Last modified on Mon 23 Aug 2021 09.19 BST

Listen here

  • Read the text version here

Tiếp tục đọc “The revolt against liberalism: what’s driving Poland and Hungary’s nativist turn? – podcast”

‘We tried to be joyful enough to deserve our new lives’: What it’s really like to be a refugee in Britain – podcast

As a child, I fled Afghanistan with my family. When we arrived in Britain after a harrowing journey, we thought we could start our new life in safety. But the reality was very different.

Photograph of Zarlasht Halaimzai. Photograph: Sarah Lee/ The Guardian
 Photograph: Sarah Lee/The Guardian

The Guardian – By Zarlasht Halaimzai – Fri 21 Jan 2022 09.00 GMT

Written by Zarlasht Halaimzai, read by Serena Manteghi, and produced by Hattie Moir.

Listen here

• Read the text version here

Tiếp tục đọc “‘We tried to be joyful enough to deserve our new lives’: What it’s really like to be a refugee in Britain – podcast”

China and the West begin the big face-off

Plain English Version – July 27, 2021

Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Photo Credit: Aly Song/Reuters.

China is challenging the West. What is the West? It is not only nations in Europe or North America. It is countries that practice democracy.

India, Japan, South Korea, and Australia are Western nations that surround China. They worry about China’s size and ambitions. They view China with suspicion. Also, in the West, the United States and most of Europe see China as an adversary.

China is one country against the West.

Tiếp tục đọc “China and the West begin the big face-off”

A new culture of dissent is remaking Cuba’s politics

worldpoliticsreview.com – William M. LeoGrande Tuesday, March 8, 2022

Anti-government protesters march in Havana, Cuba, July 11, 2021 (AP photo by Eliana Aponte).

In mid-February, a court in Holguin, Cuba, about 500 miles east of Havana, handed down sentences of up to 20 years in prison to 20 people convicted of sedition the previous month. Their crime, and that of the hundreds of others like them still awaiting verdicts elsewhere, was to have participated in widespread protests last summer, some peaceful but some violent, that took the Cuban government—and the world—by surprise.

Tiếp tục đọc “A new culture of dissent is remaking Cuba’s politics”

The Kafala system and Vietnam’s domestic workers: Corruption and a Silenced Press

newmandalaANGIE NGOC TRAN – 15 FEB, 2022

While worker grievances about abuses and exploitation since 2015 have fallen on deaf ears with the renewal of a bilateral Vietnam-Saudi Arabia labour pact (2019-2024), a recent announcement from the official state media seems to appease recent bad publicity about labor export. It reveals an entrenched network of financial interests between recruitment companies and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The Security Agency has prosecuted some officials at the Consular Department level for accepting bribes to permit recruitment companies to organise commercial flights to bring overseas workers, who pay upwards of USD $3000 for the one-way flight and quarantine costs, to return to Vietnam. It’s not a coincidence that the corruption exposé happened after waves of social media and the UN special rapporteurs’ letter about human trafficking. Still, numerous worker complaints about Department of Overseas Labour (DOLAB) officials operating in the Vietnamese Embassy in Riyadh continue to fall on deaf ears.

Tiếp tục đọc “The Kafala system and Vietnam’s domestic workers: Corruption and a Silenced Press”

Lao động Việt Nam tại Nhật qua ống kính của Fujimoto

RFI – 14/02/2022 – Thanh Phương

Áp phích của phim Along the sea tranh giải Liên hoan điện ảnh châu Á Vesoul 2022. © Festival de Vesoul

Tại Liên hoan điện ảnh châu Á Vesoul, Pháp, vừa bế mạc ngày 08/02/2022, bộ phim “Along the sea” ( Những cô gái bên bờ biển ) của đạo diễn Nhật Bản Fujimoto Akio đã được trao Giải thưởng lớn của ban giám khảo quốc tế. 

Bộ phim nói về cuộc sống đầy gian nan, vất vả của những thực tập sinh kỹ thuật người Việt, bị bóc lột thậm tệ nên phải bỏ nơi làm việc và như vậy trở thành những người lao động bất hợp pháp. Theo cảm nhận của các thành viên ban giám khảo Festival Vesoul, “Along the sea“ “đặt khán giả đối diện với những vấn đề xã hội-kinh tế mà các nhân vật đang gặp phải, tuy gần gũi về mặt địa lý với các nước phát triển, nhưng lại sống trong những điều kiện ngược lại hoàn toàn”. 

Tiếp tục đọc “Lao động Việt Nam tại Nhật qua ống kính của Fujimoto”