ICJ: Allegations of Genocide under the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Ukraine v. Russian Federation) – Declarations of Intervention by United States and Sweden

INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE
Peace Palace, Carnegieplein 2, 2517 KJ The Hague, Netherlands
Tel.: +31 (0)70 302 2323 Fax: +31 (0)70 364 9928

Press Release
Unofficial
No. 2022/33
8 September 2022
Allegations of Genocide under the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment
of the Crime of Genocide (Ukraine v. Russian Federation)


The United States of America files a declaration of intervention in the
proceedings under Article 63 of the Statute

THE HAGUE, 8 September 2022. Yesterday, the United States of America, invoking Article 63 of the Statute of the Court, filed in the Registry of the Court a declaration of intervention in the case concerning Allegations of Genocide under the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Ukraine v. Russian Federation).


Pursuant to Article 63 of the Statute, whenever the construction of a convention to which States other than those concerned in the case are parties is in question, each of these States has the right to intervene in the proceedings. In this case, the construction given by the judgment of the Court will be equally binding upon them.


To avail itself of the right of intervention conferred by Article 63 of the Statute, the United States relies on its status as a party to the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (the “Genocide Convention”). In its declaration of intervention, the United States emphasizes that “all States Parties have a significant interest in ensuring the correct interpretation, application, or fulfilment of the Genocide Convention”, adding that its “views on the questions at issue in this case are further informed by the United States’ long history of supporting efforts to
prevent and punish genocide”.


In accordance with Article 83 of the Rules of Court, Ukraine and the Russian Federation have been invited to furnish written observations on the United States’ declaration of intervention. The United States’ declaration of intervention will be available on the Court’s website shortly.


  • 2 – History of the proceedings
    The history of the proceedings can be found in press releases Nos. 2022/4, 2022/6, 2022/7,
    2022/11, 2022/25, 2022/26, 2022/27, 2022/28, 2022/29 and 2022/31, available on the Court’s
    website.

Note: The Court’s press releases are prepared by its Registry for information purposes only
and do not constitute official documents.


The International Court of Justice (ICJ) is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations.
It was established by the United Nations Charter in June 1945 and began its activities in April 1946.
The Court is composed of 15 judges elected for a nine-year term by the General Assembly and the
Security Council of the United Nations. The seat of the Court is at the Peace Palace in The Hague
(Netherlands). The Court has a twofold role: first, to settle, in accordance with international law,
through judgments which have binding force and are without appeal for the parties concerned, legal
disputes submitted to it by States; and, second, to give advisory opinions on legal questions referred
to it by duly authorized United Nations organs and agencies of the system.


Information Department:
Mr. Andrey Poskakukhin, First Secretary of the Court, Head of Department (+31 (0)70 302 2336)
Ms Joanne Moore, Information Officer (+31 (0)70 302 2337)
Mr. Avo Sevag Garabet, Associate Information Officer (+31 (0)70 302 2394)
Ms Genoveva Madurga, Administrative Assistant (+31 (0)70 302 2396)

___________________

INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE
Peace Palace, Carnegieplein 2, 2517 KJ The Hague, Netherlands
Tel.: +31 (0)70 302 2323 Fax: +31 (0)70 364 9928

Press Release
Unofficial
No. 2022/34
9 September 2022

Allegations of Genocide under the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment
of the Crime of Genocide (Ukraine v. Russian Federation)

The Kingdom of Sweden files a declaration of intervention in the
proceedings under Article 63 of the Statute

THE HAGUE, 9 September 2022. Today, the Kingdom of Sweden, invoking Article 63 of the Statute of the Court, filed in the Registry of the Court a declaration of intervention in the case concerning Allegations of Genocide under the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Ukraine v. Russian Federation).

Tiếp tục đọc “ICJ: Allegations of Genocide under the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Ukraine v. Russian Federation) – Declarations of Intervention by United States and Sweden”

The Xinjiang Police Files Should Prompt Action Against Uyghur Genocide

Olivia Enos , Contributor

I write about international human rights and national security.Follow

May 31, 2022,10:54am EDT Forbe

Listen to article 4 minutes

20180523125453301_653121197205
Photo of Hawagul Tewekkul, a 46-year-old Uyghur preliminarily sentenced to time in a political … [+] VICTIMS OF COMMUNISM MEMORIAL FOUNDATION’S XINJIANG POLICE FILES

Looking through the photos of the 2,884 inmates in the Xinjiang Police Files is not for the faint of heart. You scroll – as you would on Instagram – past face after face of a people unjustly detained by the Chinese government for no other reason than that they are Uyghur.

The first thing I noticed in the photos were their eyes. Some look bewildered, others determined, others tear-filled, others entirely blank.

Tiếp tục đọc “The Xinjiang Police Files Should Prompt Action Against Uyghur Genocide”

Ukraine: ‘Cycle of death, destruction’ must stop, UN chief tells Security Council

UN.org

The principal of a school in Chernihiv, Ukraine, surveys the damage caused during an aerial bombardment.

© UNICEF/Ashley Gilbertson VII Photo

The principal of a school in Chernihiv, Ukraine, surveys the damage caused during an aerial bombardment.

5 May 2022

Peace and Security

Briefing the Security Council on his shuttle diplomacy last week in Russia and Ukraine, Secretary-General António Guterres declared that he “did not mince words” during meetings with Presidents Putin and Zelenskyy, on the need to end the brutal conflict.

“I said the same thing in Moscow as I did in Kyiv…Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is a violation of its territorial integrity and of the Charter of the United Nations,” he told the Ambassadors.    

“It must end for the sake of the people of Ukraine, Russia, and the entire world…the cycle of death, destruction, dislocation and disruption must stop.” 

The UN chief said he had gone into an active war zone in Ukraine, after first travelling to Moscow, without much prospect of any ceasefire – as the east of the country continues to face “a full-scale ongoing attack”.

Tiếp tục đọc “Ukraine: ‘Cycle of death, destruction’ must stop, UN chief tells Security Council”

Russia’s Brutality in Ukraine Has Roots in Earlier Conflicts

Its experience in a string of wars led to the conclusion that attacking civilian populations was not only acceptable but militarily sound.

nytimes.com

Ukrainian emergency workers at a maternity hospital damaged by shelling in Mariupol last week.
Ukrainian emergency workers at a maternity hospital damaged by shelling in Mariupol last week.Credit…Evgeniy Maloletka/Associated Press
Max Fisher

By Max Fisher

Published March 18, 2022Updated March 22, 2022

As Russian artillery and rockets land on Ukrainian hospitals and apartment blocksdevastating residential districts with no military value, the world is watching with horror what is, for Russia, an increasingly standard practice.

Its forces conducted similar attacks in Syria, bombing hospitals and other civilian structures as part of Russia’s intervention to prop up that country’s government.

Moscow went even further in Chechnya, a border region that had sought independence in the Soviet Union’s 1991 breakup. During two formative wars there, Russia’s artillery and air forces turned city blocks to rubble and its ground troops massacred civilians in what was widely seen as a deliberate campaign to terrorize the population into submission.

Now, Vladimir V. Putin, whose rise to Russia’s presidency paralleled and was in some ways cemented by the Chechen wars, appears to be deploying a similar playbook in Ukraine, albeit so far only by increments.

Tiếp tục đọc “Russia’s Brutality in Ukraine Has Roots in Earlier Conflicts”

Is it time to call Putin’s war in Ukraine genocide?

In international law, genocide has nothing explicitly to do with the enormity of criminal acts but, rather, of criminal intent.

By Philip Gourevitch

newyorker – March 13, 2022

People gather around two graves covered in flowers and two large crosses.
The larger reality is that the world has never before been confronted by a genocidal war waged by a man brandishing nuclear weapons.P hotograph by Dan Kitwood / Getty

“We have to call this what it is,” Volodymyr Zelensky said, late last month, a few days after Vladimir Putin had ordered the invasion and conquest of Ukraine. “Russia’s criminal actions against Ukraine show signs of genocide.” President Zelensky, who lost family members during the Holocaust, and who also happens to have a law degree, sounded suitably cautious about invoking genocide, and he called for the International Criminal Court in The Hague to send war-crimes investigators as a first step. But such investigations take years, and rarely result in convictions. (Since the I.C.C. was established in 1998, it has indicted only Africans; and Russia, like the United States, refuses its jurisdiction.) The only court that Zelensky can make his case in for now is the court of global public opinion, where his instincts, drawing on deep wells of courage and conviction, have been unerring. And by the end of the invasion’s second week—with Putin’s indiscriminate bombardment of civilian targets intensifying, and the death toll mounting rapidly; with more than two and a half million Ukrainians having fled the country, and millions more under relentless attack in besieged cities and towns; and with no end in sight—Zelensky no longer deferred to outside experts to describe what Ukrainians face in the most absolute terms. “I will appeal directly to the nations of the world if the leaders of the world do not make every effort to stop this war,” he said in a video message on Tuesday. He paused, and looking directly into the camera, added, “This genocide.”

Tiếp tục đọc “Is it time to call Putin’s war in Ukraine genocide?”

International law : Crime of Genocide — Luật quốc tế: Hình tội diệt chủng

Genocide was first recognised as a crime under international law in 1946 by the United Nations General Assembly (A/RES/96-I). It was codified as an independent crime in the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (the Genocide Convention). The Convention has been ratified by 149 States (as of January 2018). The International Court of Justice (ICJ) has repeatedly stated that the Convention embodies principles that are part of general customary international law. This means that whether or not States have ratified the Genocide Convention, they are all bound as a matter of law by the principle that genocide is a crime prohibited under international law. The ICJ has also stated that the prohibition of genocide is a peremptory norm of international law (or ius cogens) and consequently, no derogation from it is allowed.

The definition of the crime of genocide as contained in Article II of the Genocide Convention was the result of a negotiating process and reflects the compromise reached among United Nations Member States in 1948 at the time of drafting the Convention. Genocide is defined in the same terms as in the Genocide Convention in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Article 6), as well as in the statutes of other international and hybrid jurisdictions. Many States have also criminalized genocide in their domestic law; others have yet to do so. 

(Note: The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is the law that established the  ICC)

Definition

Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide


(Rome Statue of International Court, Part II, Art. 6)



Article II

In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

  • Killing members of the group;
  • Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
  • Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
  • Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
  • Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.
Elements of the crime

The Genocide Convention establishes in Article I that the crime of genocide may take place in the context of an armed conflict, international or non-international, but also in the context of a peaceful situation. The latter is less common but still possible. The same article establishes the obligation of the contracting parties to prevent and to punish the crime of genocide.

The popular understanding of what constitutes genocide tends to be broader than the content of the norm under international law. Article II of the Genocide Convention contains a narrow definition of the crime of genocide, which includes two main elements:

A mental element: the “intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such”; and

A physical element, which includes the following five acts, enumerated exhaustively:
  • Killing members of the group;
  • Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
  • Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
  • Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
  • Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

The intent is the most difficult element to determine. To constitute genocide, there must be a proven intent on the part of perpetrators to physically destroy a national, ethnical, racial or religious group. Cultural destruction does not suffice, nor does an intention to simply disperse a group. It is this special intent, or dolus specialis, that makes the crime of genocide so unique. In addition, case law has associated intent with the existence of a State or organizational plan or policy, even if the definition of genocide in international law does not include that element.

Importantly, the victims of genocide are deliberately targeted – not randomly – because of their real or perceived membership of one of the four groups protected under the Convention (which excludes political groups, for example). This means that the target of destruction must be the group, as such, and not its members as individuals. Genocide can also be committed against only a part of the group, as long as that part is identifiable (including within a geographically limited area) and “substantial.”

Nguồn Genocide >>

Diệt chủng được Đại hội đồng Liên hợp quốc công nhận lần đầu tiên là hình tội theo luật quốc tế vào năm 1946 (A/RES/96-I). Diệt chủng được đưa vào hệ thống luật như hình tội độc lập trong Công ước Ngăn ngừa và Trừng phạt Tội Diệt chủng (Công ước Diệt chủng) năm 1948. Công ước được 149 Quốc gia phê chuẩn (tính đến tháng 1 năm 2018). Tòa Công lý Quốc tế (ICJ) đã nhiều lần tuyên bố Công ước là hiện thân của các nguyên tắc đã là một phần của luật tục quốc tế chung. Điều này nghĩa là dù các Quốc gia có phê chuẩn Công ước Diệt chủng hay không, thì tất cả các Quốc gia đều bị ràng buộc về mặt pháp lý bởi nguyên tắc diệt chủng là hình tội bị cấm theo luật quốc tế truyền thống. Tòa Công lý Quốc tế cũng tuyên bố cấm diệt chủng là quy tắc bắt buộc của luật pháp quốc tế (gọi là jus cogens) và do đó, không được phép làm yếu tội diệt chủng.

Định nghĩa tội diệt chủng được nêu trong Điều II của Công ước Diệt chủng là kết quả của quá trình thương lượng và phản ánh sự thỏa hiệp đã đạt được giữa các Quốc gia Thành viên Liên hợp quốc vào năm 1948 tại thời điểm soạn thảo Công ước. Diệt chủng cũng được định nghĩa trong Đạo luật Rome về Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế (ở Điều 6) với từ ngữ tương tự như định nghĩa trong Công ước Diệt chủng, cũng như trong các đạo luật của các thẩm quyền quốc tế và thẩm quyền hỗn hợp khác. Nhiều Quốc gia cũng hình sự hóa diệt chủng trong luật trong nước của họ; một số Quốc gia khác thì chưa làm như vậy.

(Chú thích: Đạo luật Rome về Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế (ICC) là đạo luật thiết lập Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế)

Định nghĩa

Công ước về Ngăn ngừa và Trừng phạt Tội diệt chủng

(Đạo luật Rome về Tòa Hình sự Quốc Tế, Phần II, Điều 6)

Điều II

Trong Công ước này, diệt chủng nghĩa là bất kỳ hành vi nào sau đây được thực hiện với chủ ý tiêu diệt, toàn bộ hoặc một phần, của một nhóm quốc gia, dân tộc, chủng tộc hoặc tôn giáo, như:
  • Giết các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Gây hại nghiêm trọng về thể xác hoặc tinh thần cho các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Cố ý gây ra cho nhóm các điều kiện sống được tính toán để dẫn đến hủy diệt toàn bộ hoặc một phần thể chất của nhóm;
  • Áp đặt các biện pháp có chủ ý ngăn cản sinh đẻ trong nhóm;
  • Ép chuyển trẻ em thuộc nhóm này sang nhóm khác.
Các yếu tố cấu thành tội diệt chủng

Công ước Diệt chủng quy định tại Điều I rằng tội diệt chủng có thể diễn ra trong bối cảnh xung đột vũ trang, ở trong nước hoặc ở các nước với nhau, nhưng cũng có thể diễn ra trong bối cảnh hòa bình. Bối cảnh hòa bình ít phổ biến hơn nhưng vẫn có thể xảy ra. Điều I này cũng thiết lập nghĩa vụ ngăn ngừa và trừng phạt tội diệt chủng của các nước ký Công ước.

Cách hiểu phổ thông về những gì cấu thành tội diệt chủng có khuynh hướng rộng hơn điều khoản luật theo luật quốc tế. Điều II của Công ước Diệt chủng có định nghĩa tội diệt chủng hẹp hơn, gồm hai yếu tố chính:

Yếu tố ý định: “chủ ý tiêu diệt, toàn bộ hoặc một phần, của một nhóm quốc gia, dân tộc, chủng tộc hoặc tôn giáo”; và

Yếu tố thể chất, gồm 5 hành vi sau đây, được liệt kê đầy đủ:
  • Giết các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Gây hại nghiêm trọng về thể xác hoặc tinh thần cho các thành viên trong nhóm;
  • Cố ý gây ra cho nhóm các điều kiện sống được tính toán để dẫn đến hủy diệt toàn bộ hoặc một phần thể chất của nhóm;
  • Áp đặt các biện pháp có chủ ý ngăn cản sinh đẻ trong nhóm;
  • Ép chuyển trẻ em thuộc nhóm này sang nhóm khác.

Chủ ý là yếu tố khó xác định nhất. Để cấu thành tội diệt chủng, phải chứng minh người thủ phạm có chủ ý tiêu diệt thân thể một nhóm quốc gia, dân tộc, chủng tộc hoặc tôn giáo. Hủy diệt văn hóa thì không đủ để cấu thành tội diệt chủng. Chủ ý chỉ phân tán nhóm (không cho nhóm sống tập trung với nhau) cũng không đủ để  cấu thành tội diệt chủng.  Đây là  chủ ý đặc biệt, tiếng Latinh là dolus specialis,  và chủ ý đặc biệt này làm cho tội diệt chủng trở thành khác thường. Thêm vào đó, án lệ thường xem những kế hoạch  hoặc chính sách diệt chủng của Nhà nước hoặc của một tổ chức là bằng chứng chủ ý diệt chủng, dù rằng  định nghĩa diệt chủng trong luật quốc tế không nói đến kế hoạch và chính sách.

Điều quan trọng là, các nạn nhân diệt chủng bị cố ý nhắm vào – không phải là vô tình  – vì họ là thành viên thực sự hay bị hiểu nhầm là thành viên  của một trong bốn nhóm được bảo vệ theo Công ước (các nhóm khác, ví dụ nhóm chính trị, thì không được bảo vệ).  Điều này có nghĩa là mục tiêu bị hủy diệt phải là một nhóm, chứ không phải là các thành viên với tư cách cá nhân. Diệt chủng cũng có thể nhắm vào chỉ một phần của nhóm, không hẳn là toàn bộ nhóm, miễn là phần đó có thể nhận dạng (kể cả phần đó nằm trong khu vực địa lý giới hạn) và diệt chủng “với số lượng người đáng kể”, không phải là làm hại vài người lẻ tẻ.

(Phạm Thu Hương dịch và chú thích)

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Chuỗi bài:

Genocide, Crimes against Humanity, War Crimes, Ethnic Cleansing

United Nations: Office of Genocide Prevention and the Resposibility to Protect

DEFINITIONS

Genocide

Background

Secretary-General visits Auschwitz-Birkenau, Poland. UN Photo/Evan Schneider

The word “genocide” was first coined by Polish lawyer Raphäel Lemkin in 1944 in his book Axis Rule in Occupied Europe. It consists of the Greek prefix genos, meaning race or tribe, and the Latin suffix cide, meaning killing. Lemkin developed the term partly in response to the Nazi policies of systematic murder of Jewish people during the Holocaust, but also in response to previous instances in history of targeted actions aimed at the destruction of particular groups of people. Later on, Raphäel Lemkin led the campaign to have genocide recognised and codified as an international crime. Tiếp tục đọc “Genocide, Crimes against Humanity, War Crimes, Ethnic Cleansing”

Người Trung Quốc viết về nạn diệt chủng của Khmer Đỏ

 
Posted on 23/02/2015 by The Observer
Khmer Đỏ tiếp quản Phnom PenhBiên dịch và ghi chú: Nguyễn Hải Hoành

Bài liên quan: Đọc “Pol Pot: Mổ xẻ một cơn ác mộng”;  Ảnh hưởng của Trung Quốc đối với chế độ Pol Pot

Lời giới thiệu của Dịch giả: Trong dịp kỷ niệm 30 năm ngày chính quyền Campuchia Dân chủ của Khmer Đỏ sụp đổ (4-1978), nhiều báo mạng Trung Quốc đăng bài viết về cuộc diệt chủng xảy ra dưới chính quyền này. Sau đây chúng tôi xin giới thiệu một bài có đầu đề “Vén bức màn bí mật về cuộc đại tàn sát do Khmer Đỏ tiến hành nhân danh cách mạng” (không thấy ghi tên tác giả). Vì bài rất dài nên chúng tôi lược bỏ một số đoạn không cần thiết lắm nhưng có chú thích, các đoạn còn lại thì dịch nguyên văn để bạn đọc hiểu chính xác ý tác giả. Tiếp tục đọc “Người Trung Quốc viết về nạn diệt chủng của Khmer Đỏ”

Khmer Rouge leaders found guilty of genocide in landmark ruling

(CNN) Almost four decades on from the collapse of Pol Pot’s tyrannical communist regime, an international tribunal has ruled that the Khmer Rouge committed genocide, a landmark verdict that is hoped will bring closure to millions of Cambodians.

More than 1.7 million people, or approximately a fifth of Cambodia’s population, are believed to have died from forced labor, starvation and execution under the Khmer Rouge which ruled the country between 1975 and 1979.

Tiếp tục đọc “Khmer Rouge leaders found guilty of genocide in landmark ruling”

Canada strips Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi of honorary citizenship

Alzajeera

Canadian lawmakers vote unanimously to revoke symbolic honour from Myanmar leader over her handling of Rohingya crisis.

U.N. calls for Myanmar generals to be tried for genocide, blames Facebook for incitement

Kết quả hình ảnh cho U.N. calls for Myanmar generals to be tried for genocide, blames Facebook for incitement

AUGUST 27, 2018 / 2:39 PM / Stephanie Nebehay / 9 MIN READ

GENEVA (Reuters) – Myanmar’s military carried out mass killings and gang rapes of Muslim Rohingya with “genocidal intent”, and the commander-in-chief and five generals should be prosecuted for the gravest crimes under international law, United Nations investigators said.

Click here to watch video

A report by investigators was the first time the United Nations has explicitly called for Myanmar officials to face genocide charges over their campaign against the Rohingya, and is likely to deepen the country’s isolation. Tiếp tục đọc “U.N. calls for Myanmar generals to be tried for genocide, blames Facebook for incitement”