Arctic is warming nearly four times faster than the rest of the world

theconversation.com

The Earth is approximately 1.1℃ warmer than it was at the start of the industrial revolution. That warming has not been uniform, with some regions warming at a far greater pace. One such region is the Arctic.

new study shows that the Arctic has warmed nearly four times faster than the rest of the world over the past 43 years. This means the Arctic is on average around 3℃ warmer than it was in 1980.

This is alarming, because the Arctic contains sensitive and delicately balanced climate components that, if pushed too hard, will respond with global consequences.

Why is the Arctic warming so much faster?

A large part of the explanation relates to sea ice. This is a thin layer (typically one metre to five metres thick) of sea water that freezes in winter and partially melts in the summer.

The sea ice is covered in a bright layer of snow which reflects around 85% of incoming solar radiation back out to space. The opposite occurs in the open ocean. As the darkest natural surface on the planet, the ocean absorbs 90% of solar radiation.

When covered with sea ice, the Arctic Ocean acts like a large reflective blanket, reducing the absorption of solar radiation. As the sea ice melts, absorption rates increase, resulting in a positive feedback loop where the rapid pace of ocean warming further amplifies sea ice melt, contributing to even faster ocean warming.

Tiếp tục đọc Arctic is warming nearly four times faster than the rest of the world

Human disruption to Earth’s freshwater cycle has exceeded the safe limit 

theconversation.com

Green water – the rainwater available to plants in the soil – is indispensable for life on and below the land. But in a new study, we found that widespread pressure on this resource has crossed a critical limit.

The planetary boundaries framework – a concept that scientists first discussed in 2009 – identified nine processes that have remained remarkably steady in the Earth system over the last 11,700 years. These include a relatively stable global climate and an intact biosphere that have allowed civilisations based on agriculture to thrive. Researchers proposed that each of these processes has a boundary that, once crossed, puts the Earth system, or substantial components of it, at risk of upset.

Tiếp tục đọc “Human disruption to Earth’s freshwater cycle has exceeded the safe limit “

Vietnam: Climate change, dams will drastically impact Mekong region

Asiancorrespondent – THE millions of people who depend on the Mekong River for survival are at risk due to the twin threats of climate change and hydroelectric power plants. While the latter is often seen as part of the solution to the former, in this case hydroelectricity may, in fact, be a more urgent threat. Tiếp tục đọc “Vietnam: Climate change, dams will drastically impact Mekong region”

Dams upriver exacerbate drought in Mekong Delta

Update: March, 10/2016 – 09:14

Experts at the conference rejected study results that claimed the 11 hydropower dams in the Mekong River had little impact on Viet Nam and millions of people downstream. — VNA/VNS Photo Duy Khuong

vietnamnews – CẦN THƠ (VNS) — Aside from natural forces like climate change, countries’ actions have worsened the drought and salinity in Việt Nam’s Mekong Delta. Tiếp tục đọc “Dams upriver exacerbate drought in Mekong Delta”

Việt Nam: Biến đổi khí hậu, đập thủy điện sẽ ảnh hưởng thảm khốc đến khu vực Mê kông.

English – Vietnam: Climate change, dams will drastically impact Mekong region

Hàng triệu người có nguồn sinh kế dựa vào sông Mê Kong đang gặp rủi ro trước mối đe doạ kép của biến đổi khí hậu và các nhà máy thuỷ điện. Mặc dù nhà máy thuỷ điện thường được xem là một phần giải pháp chống biến đổi khí hậu, nhưng trong trường hợp này, thuỷ điện  thực tế lại là mối đe dọạ khẩn cấp hơn.

Khi phát triển kinh tế và cạnh tranh gây tổn hại tới thịnh vượng Tiếp tục đọc “Việt Nam: Biến đổi khí hậu, đập thủy điện sẽ ảnh hưởng thảm khốc đến khu vực Mê kông.”

The Clean Power Plan: What’s Water Got To Do With It?

WRI – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s new Clean Power Plan has been heralded as a major step toward a low-carbon economy in the United States. By reducing carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 32 percent from 2005 levels by 2030, the new policy is designed to promote the development of renewable energy sources nationwide.
Tiếp tục đọc “The Clean Power Plan: What’s Water Got To Do With It?”