La folie des grandeurs

vietnamnews Update: May, 06/2018 – 09:00
Painting of West Lake by Hanoi-based artist George Burchett.

by George Burchett*

Around the time Admiral Charles Rigault de Genouilly (1807-1873), under the orders of Emperor Napoleon III, fired the first canon shots of the Cochinchina campaign (1858-1862) to lay claim to what would become France’s colony of Indochina, Paris embarked on an epic renovation project directed by Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann, also under the Emperor’s orders. The plan was to modernise Paris and get rid of insalubrious slums – breeding ground for diseases as well as popular discontent.  No doubt rich plunder from the colonies helped fund this – largely successful – imperial enterprise. Continue reading “La folie des grandeurs”

Advertisements

​Vietnamese movie wins Best Asian Film at int’l film festival in Iran

The movie about a father’s journey to take his son to hospital touched judges’ hearts at the festival

By Tuan Son / Tuoi Tre News Saturday, April 28, 2018, 14:02 GMT+7

Vietnamese director Luong Dinh Dung (R) poses for a photo with Reza Mirkarimi, director of the 36th Fajr International Film Festival in Tehran, Iran, April 27, 2018.

Vietnamese independent movie Cha Cõng Con (Father and Son) has won Best Asian Film at the 36th annual Fajr International Film Festival that concluded on Friday in Iran.

The movie, directed by Luong Dinh Dung, was among 15 entries from 13 countries shortlisted for the festival’s Eastern Vista Awards, which recognizes films from Asian and Islamic countries.

The five-member board of judges, headed by three-time Oscar-winning American director Oliver Stone, praised the Vietnamese movie for the simplicity and homeliness in its narrative that stood out from the remaining award contenders. Continue reading “​Vietnamese movie wins Best Asian Film at int’l film festival in Iran”

The world’s required reading list: The books that students read in 28 countries

reading2

This compilation of reading assigned to students everywhere will expand your horizons — and your bookshelves.

In the US, most students are required to read To Kill a Mockingbird during their school years. This classic novel combines a moving coming-of-age story with big issues like racism and criminal injustice. Reading Mockingbird is such an integral part of the American educational experience that we wondered: What classic books are assigned to students elsewhere?

We posed this question to our TED-Ed Innovative Educators and members of the TED-Ed Community. People all over the globe responded, and we curated our list to focus on local authors. Many respondents made it clear in their countries, as in the US, few books are absolutely mandatory. Below, take a look at what students in countries from Ireland to Iran, Ghana to Germany, are asked to read and why. [Note: To find free, downloadable versions of many of the books listed below, search Project Gutenberg.]

Afghanistan

Quran
What it’s about: The revelations of God as told to the prophet Muhammad, this is the central religious text of Islam and remains one of the major works of Arabic literature.
Why it’s taught: “Overall, there is no culture of reading novels in my country, which is sad,” says Farokh Attah. “The only book that must be read in school is the holy Quran, and everyone is encouraged to read it starting from childhood.” Continue reading “The world’s required reading list: The books that students read in 28 countries”

Vietnam War in photos, Part III: Hands of a Nation

Part I: Early Years and Escalation
Part II: Losses and Withdrawal
Part III: Hands of a Nation

The Atlantic, Alan Taylor, Apr 1, 2015
26 Photos

The photojournalist Eddie Adams, who covered the Vietnam War for the Associated Press, not only captured the action and chaos but took the time to get up close to the Vietnamese people whenever he could. In 1968, he undertook a project called “Hands of a Nation,” taking intimate photos of the hands of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians. Their hands were busy doing so many things then: reaching out for medicine, grasping weapons, straining against bindings, soothing, praying, rebuilding. Adams photographed hands young and old, belonging to the healthy and the wounded, the living and the dead.
Hints: View this page full screen.

Vietnam War in photos, Part II: Losses and Withdrawal

Part I: Early Years and Escalation
Part II: Losses and Withdrawal
Part III: Hands of a Nation

The Attlantic, Alan Taylor, Mar 31, 2015.
50 Photos

Early in 1968, North Vietnamese troops and the Viet Cong launched the largest battle of the Vietnam War, attacking more than 100 cities simultaneously with more than 80,000 fighters. After brief losses, U.S. and South Vietnamese forces regained lost territory, and dealt heavy losses to the North. Tactically, the offensive was a huge loss for the North, but it marked a significant turning point in public opinion and political support, leading to a drawdown of U.S. troop involvement, and eventual withdrawal in 1973. This photo essay, part two of a three-part series, covers the war years between 1968 and 1975.

Warning: Several of these photographs are graphic in nature.

Hints: View this page full screen.

  • A young South Vietnamese woman covers her mouth as she stares into a mass grave where victims of a reported Viet Cong massacre were being exhumed near Dien Bai village, east of Hue, in April of 1969. The woman’s husband, father, and brother had been missing since the Tet Offensive, and were feared to be among those killed by Communist forces.

    Continue reading “Vietnam War in photos, Part II: Losses and Withdrawal”

Vietnam War in photos, Part I: Early Years and Escalation

Part I: Early Years and Escalation
Part II: Losses and Withdrawal
Part III: Hands of a Nation

The Atlantic, Alan Taylor, Mar 30, 2015.
46 Photos

Fifty years ago, in March 1965, 3,500 U.S. Marines landed in South Vietnam. They were the first American combat troops on the ground in a conflict that had been building for decades. The communist government of North Vietnam (backed by the Soviet Union and China) was locked in a battle with South Vietnam (supported by the United States) in a Cold War proxy fight. The U.S. had been providing aid and advisors to the South since the 1950s, slowly escalating operations to include bombing runs and ground troops. By 1968, more than 500,000 U.S. troops were in the country, fighting alongside South Vietnamese soldiers as they faced both a conventional army and a guerrilla force in unforgiving terrain. Each side suffered and inflicted huge losses, with the civilian populace suffering horribly. Based on widely varying estimates, between 1.5 and 3.6 million people were killed in the war. This photo essay, part one of a three-part series, looks at the earlier stages of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, as well as the growing protest movement, between the years 1962 and 1967.

Warning: Several of these photographs are graphic in nature.

Hints: View this page full screen.

21 Iconic Photos of the Vietnam War

An American 1st Air Cavalry Skycrane helicopter, during Operation Pegasus in Vietnam in 1968, delivering ammunition and supplies into a US Marine outpost besieged by North Vietnamese troops at the forward base of Khe Sanh. (Larry Burrows—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images).

HISTORY

See 21 Iconic Photos of the Vietnam War

TIME Photo
Apr 30, 2015

It has been 40 years since the spring day when the last U.S. helicopters lifted up and, shortly after, the North Vietnamese army entered Saigon, deciding a conflict that had raged for years. News photographs from the time showed the world what was going on, from a country full of death in all its gruesome forms to peaceful protests across the ocean. Despite their age, those images have not lost their impact. Continue reading “21 Iconic Photos of the Vietnam War”

1965-1975 Another Vietnam: Unseen images of the war from the winning side

1972

Activists meet in the Nam Can forest, wearing masks to hide their identities from one another in case of capture and interrogation. From here in the mangrove swamps of the Mekong Delta, forwarding images to the North was difficult. “Sometimes the photos were lost or confiscated on the way,” said the photographer.

Image: Vo Anh Khanh/Another Vietnam/National Geographic Books

Continue reading “1965-1975 Another Vietnam: Unseen images of the war from the winning side”

Hội thảo Kiến trúc bền vững, Hà Nội 27.3.2018

Mình (Hằng) sẽ có mặt ở hội thảo, mong gặp các bạn và trao đổi tại hội thảo 

 

HỘI THẢO KIẾN TRÚC BỀN VỮNG, Hà Nội 27.3.2018

Trình diễn Mô phỏng công trình cho thiết kế trường học Điếc & Khiếm thính & Chia sẻ kinh nghiệm từ CHLB Đức

Nằm trong khuôn khổ của Chương trình Kiến trúc Bền vững – Trao đổi kiến thức về Ứng dụng Mô phỏng Hiệu năng công trình xây dựng giữa Việt Nam và CHLB Đức, Hội thảo Kiến trúc Bền vững được tổ chức nhằm chia sẻ nền tảng quan điểm, kinh nghiệm về kiến trúc bền vững từ chuyên gia kĩ sư khí hậu người đến từ CHLB Đức và Việt Nam.

Các hoạt động chính tại hội thảo bao gồm:

– Tham quan triển lãm thiết kế trường học Điếc & Khiếm thính và lắng nghe trình bày các kết quả mô phỏng hiệu năng công trình; – Giao lưu và thảo luận mở giữa các cá nhân, tổ chức quan tâm tới mô phỏng hiệu năng công trình và kĩ sư khí hậu đến từ hai quốc gia.

Thời gian: 13:30 – 17:00 thứ Ba ngày 27 tháng 03 năm 2018
Địa điểm: Phòng U204, tầng 2, nhà U, Trường ĐH Kiến trúc Hà Nội, Km 10, Nguyễn Trãi, Hà Đông, Hà Nội

DIỄN GIẢ HỘI THẢO KIẾN

Giáo sư Volkmar Bleicher với hơn 20 năm kinh nghiệm về mô phỏng hiệu năng công trình là CEO tập đoàn Transsolar – nằm trong danh sách các công ty hàng đầu thế giới về kỹ thuật công trình thích ứng khí hậu. Đồng thời ông là giáo sư giảng dạy tại ĐH Khoa học Ứng dụng HFT Stuttgart, CHLB Đức.
Tại Hội thảo Kiến trúc Bền vững diễn ra vào chiều thứ Ba ngày 27/03 sắp tới, Giáo sư sẽ chia sẻ những nền tảng quan điểm, kinh nghiệm về kĩ sư khí hậu và mô phỏng hiệu năng công trình xây dựng.

Nếu bạn muốn đăng ký tham gia hội thảo, hãy liên hệ hòm thư:
een.vn.vsse@gmail.com hoặc hotline: 024 6655 3445

 

Bộ sưu tập hình ảnh về Việt Nam trong thập niên 1890

HAVN
Bờ hồ Hoàn Kiếm, gần lối vào đền Ngọc Sơn, Hà Nội 1896. Một trạm tàu điện đã được xây dựng tại khu vực này năm 1916. Hình ảnh do nhiếp ảnh gia Pháp Firmin André Salles (1860-1929) thực hiện, được giới thiệu trong bộ sưu tập của thành viên Manhhai trên trang Flickr.com.
Bờ hồ Hoàn Kiếm, gần lối vào đền Ngọc Sơn, Hà Nội 1896. Một trạm tàu điện đã được xây dựng tại khu vực này năm 1916. Hình ảnh do nhiếp ảnh gia Pháp Firmin André Salles (1860-1929) thực hiện, được giới thiệu trong bộ sưu tập của thành viên Manhhai trên trang Flickr.com.

Continue reading “Bộ sưu tập hình ảnh về Việt Nam trong thập niên 1890”

Việt Nam những năm 1990 qua ống kính của Tổng lãnh sự Canada

VNExpress Thứ bảy, 17/2/2018 | 18:30 GMT+7

Hình ảnh ở hồ Gươm, kinh thành Huế hay Nhà hát Thành phố được ông Kyle Nunas ghi lại vào năm 1997.

Việt Nam những năm 1990 qua ống kính của Tổng lãnh sự Canada

Kyle Michael Nunas hiện là Tổng lãnh sự Canada tại TP HCM. Trong hành trình khám phá Việt Nam cách đây hơn 20 năm, ông đã ghi lại nhiều hình ảnh từ cảnh vật, kiến trúc, đường phố đến con người. Qua ống kính của nhà ngoại giao, mọi thứ được ghi lại chân thực và sống động, từ buổi sớm sương giăng trên hồ Hoàn Kiếm đến ánh đèn đêm huyền ảo ở Sài Gòn hay cuộc sống của người dân ở miền sông nước. Continue reading “Việt Nam những năm 1990 qua ống kính của Tổng lãnh sự Canada”

Loạt ảnh tô màu “made in Vietnam” trăm năm trước

Kiến Thức 

Những bức ảnh tô màu theo lối thủ công được lưu giữ từ xa xưa đã trở thành những tác phẩm độc đáo và hiếm có của làng nhiếp ảnh Việt Nam.

Những bức tranh Việt làm “say lòng” thế giới

Dân trí Tranh Việt ở đầu thế kỷ 20 có rất nhiều bức được thế giới biết đến và sẵn sàng trả giá cao, trong đó, có bức đã được mua với giá lên tới hơn… 18 tỉ đồng.

Mỹ thuật Việt Nam đầu thế kỷ 20 chứa đựng vẻ đẹp nghệ thuật ấn tượng và vẻ đẹp văn hóa đậm đà. Sự kết hợp ý vị đã khiến tranh của các họa sĩ Việt ở đầu thế kỷ 20 luôn thu hút người mua trên khắp thế giới mỗi khi xuất hiện trở lại tại các cuộc đấu giá:

Bức “Bức màn tím” của
Bức “Bức màn tím” của họa sĩ Lê Phổ được thực hiện trong khoảng thời gian từ 1942-1945. Tháng 4/2012, tại Hồng Kông, bức “Bức màn tím” đã được bán đấu giá với mức giá 2,9 triệu đô la Hồng Kông (hơn 8 tỉ đồng). Tại thời điểm này, đây được coi là mức giá cao nhất từng được trả cho một tác phẩm mỹ thuật của một họa sĩ Việt Nam. Continue reading “Những bức tranh Việt làm “say lòng” thế giới”

Ngỡ ngàng với ảnh hầu đồng của Nguyễn Á

 0 THANH NIÊN ONLINE

Lao động nghệ thuật ròng rã trong vòng 2 năm, nghệ sĩ nhiếp ảnh Nguyễn Á vừa hoàn thành bộ ảnh đẹp về Nghi lễ tín ngưỡng thờ Mẫu (Hầu đồng) với những khoảng khắc thăng hoa xuất thần….

Nghệ nhân ưu tú Nguyễn Thị Nhỡ đang hầu giá /// NGUYỄN Á
Nghệ nhân ưu tú Nguyễn Thị Nhỡ đang hầu giá – NGUYỄN Á

Đối với người yêu nhiếp ảnh VN, Nguyễn Á không phải là tên tuổi xa lạ với 25 năm cầm máy. Anh nổi tiếng với nhiều bộ sưu tập ảnh: Hoàng Sa – Trường Sa, biển đảo VN, Đờn ca tài tử – Lời tự tình của dân tộc quê hương và 11 di sản văn hóa phi vật thể VN được UNESCO vinh danh, Nick Vujicic & những ngày ở VN…

Continue reading “Ngỡ ngàng với ảnh hầu đồng của Nguyễn Á”

Bộ ảnh màu Việt Nam xưa những năm 1915

VNInfographic – Những tấm hình về đất nước, con người Việt Nam những năm 1915 tại Bảo tàng Albert Kahn thuộc ngoại ô Hauts-de-Seine, Paris của hai tác giả là của Albert Kahn và W. Robert Moore.
Hai ông nghiện ngồi uống trà và hút thuốc lào trong một tiệm hút – Hà Nội 1915
Một vị kỳ mục gần Hà Nội 1920

Continue reading “Bộ ảnh màu Việt Nam xưa những năm 1915”