Sahel (Africa) violence could drive more refugees toward Europe

FILE- In this April 15, 2022 file photo, malnourished children wait for treatment in the pediatric department of Boulmiougou hospital in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. The U.N. is warning that 18 million people in Africa’s Sahel region face severe hunger in the next three months. Two U.N. agencies are citing the impacts of war in Ukraine, the coronavirus pandemic, climate-induced shocks and rising costs – and warning that people may try to migrate out of the affected areas. (AP Photo/Sophie Garcia, File)

GENEVA (AP) — The head of the U.N. refugee agency says “Europe should be much more worried” that more people from Africa’s Sahel region could seek to move north to escape violence, climate crises like droughts and floods and the impact of growing food shortages caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.Filippo Grandi, the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, called for more efforts to build peace in the world as conflicts and crises like those in Ukraine, Venezuela, Myanmar, Syria and beyond have driven over 100 million people to leave their homes — both within their own countries and abroad.

UNHCR, the U.N.’s refugee agency, on Thursday issued its latest “Global Trends” report, which found over 89 million people had been displaced by conflict, climate change, violence and human rights abuses by 2021. The figure has since swelled after at least 12 million people fled their homes in Ukraine to other parts of the country or abroad following Russia’s Feb. 24 invasion.

This year, the world is also facing growing food insecurity — Ukraine is a key European breadbasket and the war has greatly hurt grain exports

The African Union, whose continent relies on imports of wheat and other food from Ukraine, has appealed for help to access grain that is blocked in Ukrainian silos and unable to leave Ukrainian ports amid a Russian naval blockade in the Black Sea.

Ukraine’s ‘Nuremberg Moment’ Amid Flood of Alleged Russian War Crimes

So many crimes are being documented that they need a new court.

foreignpolicy.com

By Robbie Gramer, a diplomacy and national security reporter at Foreign Policy, and Amy Mackinnon, a national security and intelligence reporter at Foreign Policy

An aerial view of crosses, floral tributes, and photographs of the victims of the battles for Irpin and Bucha that mark the graves in a cemetery in Irpin, Ukraine, on May 16.
An aerial view of crosses, floral tributes, and photographs of the victims of the battles for Irpin and Bucha that mark the graves in a cemetery in Irpin, Ukraine, on May 16.

JUNE 10, 2022, 3:48 PM

As Russia continues its assault on Ukraine, top Biden administration officials are working behind the scenes with the Ukrainian government and European allies to document a tsunami of war crimes allegedly committed by Russian forces.

Putin’s War

How the world is dealing with Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

But the sheer volume of the documented war crime cases could be too overwhelming for Ukraine’s justice system as well as for the International Criminal Court (ICC), raising questions of how many cases will be brought to trial and how many accused Russian war criminals could ultimately face justice.

Tiếp tục đọc “Ukraine’s ‘Nuremberg Moment’ Amid Flood of Alleged Russian War Crimes”

Ukraine: ‘Cycle of death, destruction’ must stop, UN chief tells Security Council

UN.org

The principal of a school in Chernihiv, Ukraine, surveys the damage caused during an aerial bombardment.

© UNICEF/Ashley Gilbertson VII Photo

The principal of a school in Chernihiv, Ukraine, surveys the damage caused during an aerial bombardment.

5 May 2022

Peace and Security

Briefing the Security Council on his shuttle diplomacy last week in Russia and Ukraine, Secretary-General António Guterres declared that he “did not mince words” during meetings with Presidents Putin and Zelenskyy, on the need to end the brutal conflict.

“I said the same thing in Moscow as I did in Kyiv…Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is a violation of its territorial integrity and of the Charter of the United Nations,” he told the Ambassadors.    

“It must end for the sake of the people of Ukraine, Russia, and the entire world…the cycle of death, destruction, dislocation and disruption must stop.” 

The UN chief said he had gone into an active war zone in Ukraine, after first travelling to Moscow, without much prospect of any ceasefire – as the east of the country continues to face “a full-scale ongoing attack”.

Tiếp tục đọc “Ukraine: ‘Cycle of death, destruction’ must stop, UN chief tells Security Council”

Russian troops use rape as ‘an instrument of war’ in Ukraine, rights groups allege

By Tara John, Oleksandra Ochman and Sandi Sidhu, CNN

Updated 0420 GMT (1220 HKT) April 22, 2022

Karina Yershova, right, is pictured with her grandmother in an undated photograph provided by the family.

Karina Yershova, right, is pictured with her grandmother in an undated photograph provided by the family.

Lviv, Ukraine (CNN)When Russian troops invaded Ukraine and began closing in on its capital, Kyiv, Andrii Dereko begged his 22-year-old stepdaughter Karina Yershova to leave the suburb where she lived.

But Yershova insisted she wanted to remain in Bucha, telling him: “Don’t talk nonsense, everything will be fine — there will be no war,” he said.

With her tattoos and long brown hair, Yershova stood out in a crowd, her stepfather said, adding that despite living with rheumatoid arthritis, she had a fiercely independent spirit: “She herself decided how to live.”

Yershova worked at a sushi restaurant in Bucha, and hoped to earn her university degree in the future, Dereko said: “She wanted to develop herself.”

Unclaimed and unidentified: Bucha empties its mass graves

Unclaimed and unidentified: Bucha empties its mass graves 03:24

As Russian soldiers surrounded Bucha in early March, Yershova hid in an apartment with two other friends. On one of the last occasions Dereko and his wife, Olena, heard from Yershova, she told them she had left the apartment to get food from a nearby supermarket.

Tiếp tục đọc “Russian troops use rape as ‘an instrument of war’ in Ukraine, rights groups allege”

Russia’s Brutality in Ukraine Has Roots in Earlier Conflicts

Its experience in a string of wars led to the conclusion that attacking civilian populations was not only acceptable but militarily sound.

nytimes.com

Ukrainian emergency workers at a maternity hospital damaged by shelling in Mariupol last week.
Ukrainian emergency workers at a maternity hospital damaged by shelling in Mariupol last week.Credit…Evgeniy Maloletka/Associated Press
Max Fisher

By Max Fisher

Published March 18, 2022Updated March 22, 2022

As Russian artillery and rockets land on Ukrainian hospitals and apartment blocksdevastating residential districts with no military value, the world is watching with horror what is, for Russia, an increasingly standard practice.

Its forces conducted similar attacks in Syria, bombing hospitals and other civilian structures as part of Russia’s intervention to prop up that country’s government.

Moscow went even further in Chechnya, a border region that had sought independence in the Soviet Union’s 1991 breakup. During two formative wars there, Russia’s artillery and air forces turned city blocks to rubble and its ground troops massacred civilians in what was widely seen as a deliberate campaign to terrorize the population into submission.

Now, Vladimir V. Putin, whose rise to Russia’s presidency paralleled and was in some ways cemented by the Chechen wars, appears to be deploying a similar playbook in Ukraine, albeit so far only by increments.

Tiếp tục đọc “Russia’s Brutality in Ukraine Has Roots in Earlier Conflicts”

The Ukraine Crisis Threatens a Sustainable Food Future

WRI.org

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has already driven millions of people from their homes and left many without water, power and food. As hostilities continue, the humanitarian and economic consequences will expand far beyond the region, putting potentially millions of people around the world at risk of hunger.  

And these aren’t just short-term threats. The decisions that farmers and policymakers make over the next few weeks and months will have long-term consequences for the future of the world’s food systems. The right responses can keep the world on track for a sustainable food future. The wrong ones will worsen food insecurity and fuel climate change.

Ukrainian refugees at the Poland border.
Ukrainian refugees escape to the border town of Medyka, Poland. Millions of Ukrainian residents have fled their homes in recent weeks, due to the Russian invasion. Photo by Damian Pankowiec/Shutterstock

Emerging Food Implications of the Ukraine Crisis

Tiếp tục đọc “The Ukraine Crisis Threatens a Sustainable Food Future”

3 Hình tội Chiến tranh xâm lược của Trung quốc đối với nhân dân Việt Nam

First posted on UNCLOSforum.wordpress.com on Aug. 6, 2014

 

Tuyên cáo về các Nguyên tắc Luật Quốc tế về Liên hệ Hữu nghị và Hợp tác giữa các Quốc gia theo đúng Hiến chương Liên hợp quốc (“Tuyên cáo”) được Đại hội đồng Liên hợp quốc thông qua ngày 17 tháng 10 năm 1970 quy định “Nguyên tắc rằng mọi Quốc gia, trong các liên hệ quốc tế, tự kiềm chế không dùng hăm dọa hay sử dụng vũ lực chống lại toàn vẹn chủ quyền hoặc độc lập chính trị của bất kỳ Quốc gia nào hoặc dưới bất kỳ hình thức nào trái ngược với các mục đích của Hiến chương Liên hợp quốc.”

Bản Tuyên cáo tuyên bố: Tiếp tục đọc “3 Hình tội Chiến tranh xâm lược của Trung quốc đối với nhân dân Việt Nam”

China’s 3 Crimes of War of Aggression against the Vietnamese People

First posted on UNCLOSforum.wordpress.com on Aug. 5, 2014

Read full text with full citations, Word 2007 >>
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Due to technical difficulties, the following text has no footnotes and no citations.

Bản tiếng Việt >>

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China’s 3 Crimes of War of Aggression against the Vietnamese People

The UN General Assembly’s Declaration on Principles of International Law concerning Friendly Relations and Co-operation among States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations (Oct. 17, 1970) (hereinafter “the Declaration”) provided, inter alia, “The principle that States shall refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State or in any other manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations”.

The Declaration announced: Tiếp tục đọc “China’s 3 Crimes of War of Aggression against the Vietnamese People”

Amendments to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court on the Crime of Aggression – Tu chính án Đạo luật Rome của Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế về Tội Xâm Lược

First posted on UNCLOSforum.wordpress.com on July 27, 2014

This is the law for China leaders and every political or military leader in the world.

The Vietnamese version follows the English version.

 

Amendments to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal
Court on the Crime of Aggression

1. Article 5, paragraph 2, of the Statute is deleted.

2. The following text is inserted after article 8 of the Statute:

Article 8 bis -Crime of aggression

1. For the purpose of this Statute, “crime of aggression” means the planning, preparation, initiation or execution, by a person in a position effectively to exercise control over or to direct the political or military action of a State, of an act of aggression which, by its character, gravity and scale, constitutes a manifest violation of the Charter of the United Nations. Tiếp tục đọc “Amendments to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court on the Crime of Aggression – Tu chính án Đạo luật Rome của Tòa Hình sự Quốc tế về Tội Xâm Lược”