Taskforce in national park rescues hundreds of trapped animals

31/07/2020    11:23 GMT+7 vietnamnet

In the Pu Mat National Park of the central province of Nghe An, there is a special task force that rescues wild animals trapped by hunters.

Taskforce in national park rescues hundreds of trapped animals
The animal rescue team of Pu Mat National Park passes a stream while patrolling the forest (Photo: thanhnien.vn)

The animal rescue team of the park has 15 members carefully selected from 170 candidates.

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Vietnam’s illegal ivory market continues to thrive, report finds

Using artificial intelligence to investigate illegal wildlife trade on social media

Sciencedaily.com

Date:March 12, 2018 Source:University of Helsinki

FULL STORY

These are Southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum) in an undisclosed protected area in South Africa.
Credit: Enrico Di Minin

Illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation and is currently expanding to social media. This is a worrisome trend, given the ease of access and popularity of social media. Efficient monitoring of illegal wildlife trade on social media is therefore crucial for conserving biodiversity.

In a new article published in the journal Conservation Biology, scientists from the University of Helsinki, Digital Geography Lab, argue that methods from artificial intelligence can be used to help monitor the illegal wildlife trade on social media. Tiếp tục đọc “Using artificial intelligence to investigate illegal wildlife trade on social media”

Large-scale illegal trade in hundreds of wild-collected ornamental plants in Southeast Asia

Date:September 14, 2015

Source:National University of Singapore

Sciencedaily – Southeast Asia is a widely recognised centre of illegal wildlife trade — both as the source region for species ranging from seahorses to tigers, and as a global consumer of ivory carvings, wild pets, and traditional Chinese medicinal products.

While there are mounting efforts to tackle illegal wildlife trade, including within Singapore to reduce demand for wildlife products, the illegal trade in some species still remains undocumented.

Associate Professor Edward L. Webb, from the Department of Biological Sciences at the National University of Singapore (NUS), and NUS PhD graduate Dr Jacob Phelps, have uncovered a previously little recognised Southeast Asian wildlife trade — the illegal sale of wild-collected ornamental plants, especially orchids.

Their findings were recently published in the journal Biological Conservation in June 2015.

Uncovering the “invisible” orchid trade

The researchers conducted extensive surveys of wildlife markets across Thailand, including border markets with Laos and Myanmar, and identified more than 400 species of ornamental plants in illegal trade — species widely prized by plant enthusiasts for their beauty, fragrance and/or rarity. Over 80% of these plants traded at the markets are wild orchids. Some of these were even listed in published literature as threatened. Tiếp tục đọc “Large-scale illegal trade in hundreds of wild-collected ornamental plants in Southeast Asia”