WE NEVER KNEW: Napalm use during Việt Nam’s French-American War

vietnamnews.vn – Update: May, 03/2020 – 08:35

HISTORIC: The Geneva Conference in 1954 decided to split Việt Nam into two: the North under the administration of the Hồ Chí Minh Government, the South under the pro-French, US-supported Saì Gòn regime. VNA/VNS Archives

by Lady Borton*

No one knew the Geneva Agreement’s signing ending Việt Nam’s French-American War (1945‒1954) was imminent. This included the Vietnamese, French, Europeans, and Africans who fought at Cầu Lồ in northern Việt Nam’s Red River Delta on July 14, 1954, nine weeks after Việt Nam’s victory over France in the prolonged battle at Điện Biên Phủ and a week before the Geneva signing.

The officers of the 36th Regiment, 308th Division of the PAVN (People’s Army of Việt Nam) were famous for devising innovative strategy and for protecting their troops, yet at Cầu Lồ the PAVN lost one-third of a full-strength regiment—318 soldiers. Most lie in nameless graves.

How could this huge loss have happened?

The answer? Geography, strong French defences, and American heavy weapons.

But that’s not all.[1] Tiếp tục đọc “WE NEVER KNEW: Napalm use during Việt Nam’s French-American War”