Actions Large Energy Buyers Can Take to Transform and Decarbonize the Grid: Procurement Practices for Achieving 100% Carbon Free Electricity

WRI.org

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

▪ Large energy buyers—including corporates, cities, and institutional customers—have played and will continue to play an important role in driving clean energy in the near term, particularly renewables. However, to ensure that the power sector achieves deep decarbonization over the next two to three decades, large energy buyers will need to take additional actions to play a leading role in accelerating the transition to a carbon-free grid.

▪ Large energy buyers can implement approaches that help transform the grid such as matching clean energy purchasing with the timing of their energy use, incorporating demand flexibility, purchasing dispatchable clean electricity, adopting enabling technologies (e.g., energy storage), maximizing emissions reductions, and driving an an equitable transition to clean energy.

▪ There is no single strategy for implementing transformative procurement practices, which is why we have
highlighted a variety of approaches in this issue brief. Optimal procurement approaches can vary based on differences in customer electricity usage, market context, available product offerings, staff and resources, and differences across grids.

▪ To enable large energy buyers to implement transformative procurement practices, new products and solutions will be needed. Metrics and recognition programs will also need to be revised to incentivize and encourage more customers to take actions that can facilitate a carbon-free grid.

Download full paper here

Report: New solar is cheaper to build than to run existing coal plants in China, India and most of Europe

renewableworld.com

By Jennifer Runyon -6.23.2021

Source: BloombergNEF. Note: The map indicates for each country the technology with the lowest LCOE per MWh for new-build solar (yellow) and wind (blue) or running costs fo existing coal (black) or gas (gray). Running costs include a carbon price where applicable. Calculations exclude subsidies and tax-credits. Natural gas reflects combined-cycle gas turbines.

This week, BloombergNEF’s released estimates for its global benchmark that tracks the levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for utility-scale PV and onshore wind. The LCOE looks at the all-in cost to build, operate, and maintain power plants and then calculates the cost per megawatt-hour (MWh) of the energy produced based on all of those inputs.

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China key to Vietnam’s solar success

Chinadialogue.net

A rapid rise in Vietnam’s solar power has been boosted by Chinese finance and technology, but more support is still going to fossil fuels

Solar energy in Vietnam has grown rapidly since 2018, supported by Chinese finance and technology (Image: Alamy)Solar energy in Vietnam has grown rapidly since 2018, supported by Chinese finance and technology (Image: Alamy)

Linh Pham

June 30, 2021

Vietnam has been a Southeast Asia solar success story. It went from having barely any generation in 2018 to a quarter of its total installed capacity being solar – a 100-fold increase in two years.

This rapid growth is mainly down to the Vietnamese government’s feed-in tariff which provides a guaranteed above-market price for renewable energy producers; other incentives signed off in 2017 in an attempt to pivot away from lagging fossil fuel projects; and cheaper solar panels, some of which are assembled domestically.

Around 99% of the installed solar panels in Vietnam come from China. At the same time, China is one of the few countries that still lends Vietnam money to build coal plants.

China’s future role in Vietnam’s power system will be shaped by the latter’s newest plan for its power sector. The final version of the Power Development Plan 8 is due to be published in June, though it has been postponed before and may be again.

Tiếp tục đọc “China key to Vietnam’s solar success”

Investors pump billions into offshore wind power plants

By Anh Minh   June 16, 2021 | 04:57 pm GMT+7 VNExpressInvestors pump billions into offshore wind power plantsWind turbines in the province of Bac Lieu, southern Vietnam. Photo by VnExpress/Nguyet Nhi.Foreign and local investors have poured billions of dollars into developing offshore wind farms.

Thang Long Wind, a $11.9-billion, 3.4 GW offshore plant, is being built in the central province of Binh Thuan.

Installation of floats will be completed in July to gather oceanographic data related to waves, wind and currents.

La Gan, another offshore wind farm, a joint venture between Asia Petroleum Energy Corporation (Asia Petro), Novasia Energy Company and Danish fund management firm Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP), will have a capacity of 3.5 GW and cost $10.5 billion.

Tiếp tục đọc “Investors pump billions into offshore wind power plants”

Why the U.S. Doesn’t Dominate the Solar-Panel Industry Anymore

theatlantic.com

America invented silicon solar cells in the 1950s. It spent more on solar R&D than any other country in the 1980s. It lost its technological advantage anyway.

Robinson Meyer

American researchers experimented with unconventional solar-energy designs, such as this thermoelectric panel. (Universal History Archive / Universal Images Group / Getty)

You wouldn’t know it today, but the silicon photovoltaic solar cell—the standard, black-and-copper solar panel you can find on suburban rooftops and solar farms—was born and raised in America.

The technology was invented here. In 1954, three American engineers at Bell Labs discovered that electrons flow freely through silicon wafers when they are exposed to sunlight.
It was deployed here. In 1958, the U.S. Navy bolted solar panels to Vanguard 1, the second American satellite in space.

And for a time, it was even made here. In the 1960s and ’70s, American companies dominated the global solar market and registered most solar patents. As late as 1978, American firms commanded 95 percent of the global solar market,  Tiếp tục đọc “Why the U.S. Doesn’t Dominate the Solar-Panel Industry Anymore”

Unlocking a Renewable Energy Future: How Government Action Can Drive Private Investment

WRI.org

Download full paper here >>

This Working Paper is part of the Clean Energy within our Energy Program. Reach out to Norma Hutchinson for more information.AuthorsNorma HutchinsonMaggie Dennis, Emil Damgaard Grann, Tyler Clevenger, Michelle Manion, Johannes Bøggild and Jennifer LaykePrimary Contacts

LicenseCreative Commons

A renewable energy future is within our grasp: the technology is now widely available and cost-effective in most places around the world. But the current rates of deployment remain well below what is required to avert the worst impacts of climate change. The private sector is poised to invest billions of dollars to massively speed up, scale and support the energy transition. However, many investors, particularly in the private sector, are deterred by some of the risks related to renewable energy investments. As the energy transition is likely to be financed largely by the private sector, governments must work with the private sector to remove barriers and incentivize investment in renewable energy.

This working paper, produced in partnership with Ørsted, focuses on the challenges and solutions to scaling investment in renewable energy generation and provides actionable policy solutions to unlock the private sector investment needed to support the energy transition.

Key Findings

  • The global transition to renewable energy is likely to be financed largely by the private sector, including utility companies, corporations, project developers, and various investment funds.
  • One critical element of the energy transition will be decarbonization of the world’s electricity supply. The needed technology is developing rapidly and the scale of the requisite investment is manageable, but current rates of deployment remain well below what is required to avert the worst impacts of climate change.
  • Challenges that inhibit decarbonization of the power sector fall into three categories: market structure that lacks appropriate incentives to catalyze private investment in new projects, lack of public support for siting renewable energy development, and incompatible or inadequate grid infrastructure.
  • Governments will play a critical role in scaling renewable energy capacity by providing regulatory frameworks and policy solutions to the challenges that are slowing down private sector investment.
  • Top priorities for governments will be to establish renewable energy targets, policies, and market instruments that incentivize and de-risk green energy investments; improve planning and permitting, and address community concerns, while balancing other concerns; and invest in modern electricity grids and infrastructure.

What We Know—and Do Not Know—About Achieving a National-Scale 100% Renewable Electric Grid

NREL.GOV

NREL and DOE Experts Offer Fresh Perspective on Technical and Economic Challenges, Call for Collaborative Solutions to Decarbonization

May 19, 2021

3D rendering of a future high-renewable city with frameless solar panels, battery energy storage, wind turbines, and skyscrapers in the background.

With recently announced federal emissions-reduction targets, a push for national power-sector decarbonization, and plummeting wind and solar costs, the United States is poised to deploy major amounts of renewables, and fast.

At smaller scales, hundreds of U.S. cities, states, and corporations have already taken bold action in setting their own local targets for 100% renewable energy—and with recent analyses like the Los Angeles 100% Renewable Energy Study (LA100), we have growing confidence that reliable, 100% renewable power grids are feasible.

Tiếp tục đọc “What We Know—and Do Not Know—About Achieving a National-Scale 100% Renewable Electric Grid”

Vietnam’s largest wind power plant enters operation

 

 

By Nguyen Quy   April 17, 2021 | 05:06 pm GMT+7 VNExpress

Vietnam’s largest wind power plant enters operation

Vietnam’s largest wind power plant begins operation in central Ninh Thuan Province on April 16, 2021. Photo courtesy of Government’s Portal.
 

HCMC-based energy firm Trungnam Group Friday has put its wind power plant in central Ninh Thuan Province into operation, considered the country’s largest to date.

The plant, which spreads over an area of 900 hectares in Thuan Bac District, has 45 turbines with a total capacity of 151.95 megawatts that costs VND4 trillion ($173.4 million), the Government portal reported.

The wind power plant is combined with a 204 MW solar power plant to form the solar-wind farm complex considered the largest in Southeast Asia. The complex will supply a total 950 million kWh per year for the country’s grid.

The private energy company has added a total 1,064 MW to the national grid comprising hydropower, solar and wind power. It plans to have a renewable output of nearly 10,000 MW by 2027.

Tran Quoc Nam, chairman of Ninh Thuan, said the province is now taking the lead with 32 solar power projects with a total capacity of 2,257 MW, and three wind power projects with an accumulative capacity of 329 MW.

Vietnam has great potential for renewable energy with its long coastline and 2,700 hours of sunshine a year on average.

Solar power currently accounts for just 0.01 percent of the country’s total power output, but the government plans to increase the ratio to 3.3 percent by 2030 and 20 percent by 2050.

Vietnam aims to produce 10.7 percent of its electricity from renewable energy sources by 2030, mainly through solar and wind power projects.

 
 

Tiếp tục đọc “Vietnam’s largest wind power plant enters operation”

One step forward, two steps back: Vietnam’s short-sighted energy vision

By Nguyen Dang Anh Thi   April 1, 2021 | 07:50 am GMT+7 vnexpress

Vietnam needs to learn the right lessons from Germany’s experience – going from protests against renewable energy to becoming one of the top five nations in clean power.

Nguyen Dang Anh Thi
Nguyen Dang Anh Thi

I choose to talk about Germany because most of the feed-in-tariff policies for Vietnam’s renewable energy have been designed using the German model and built with consultation from the Deutshe Gesellschaftür Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) or German Corporation for International Cooperation, an agency that provides services in the field of international development cooperation.

30 years ago, Germany issued the FIT policy for the first time to boost the selling of renewable electricity to the national grid. In the beginning, when the proportion of wind and solar power output made up just less than 0.1 percent of the nation’s total, there were already worries about renewable energy threatening safety and stability of the national power grid.

Back then, a group of power companies in Germany had released a joint statement creating pressure on the government, saying that renewable energy from solar, wind and hydropower plants should not exceed 4 percent of the total power output, even in the long run.

For decades, many entities in Germany had advocated thermal and nuclear power, and kept calling for delays in expanding the national power grid and delivering cautions on clean energy.

But the people of Germany had said yes big time to clean energy. Their voice, luckily, had been heard, and the government had listened to them with a long-time view, adopting consistent policies with transparency and integrity.

Tiếp tục đọc “One step forward, two steps back: Vietnam’s short-sighted energy vision”

Ministry explains cuts to capacity of renewable power plants

Vietnamnet 16/03/2021    09:05 GMT+7

Low power demand coupled with oversupply of electricity at times have forced authorities to cut the capacity of renewable energy plants in order to avoid overwhelming the national grid, according to the Ministry of Industry and Trade (MoIT).

Ministry explains cuts to capacity of renewable power plants hinh anh 1
Low power demand coupled with oversupply of electricity at times have forced authorities to cut the capacity of renewable energy plants. (Photo: VNA)

A large amount of investments from social resources has been poured into developing renewable energy, particularly solar energy, over previous years in Vietnam, according to the ministry.

However, a boom in high-capacity renewable energy projects, mainly in central and southern Vietnam, has overloaded inter-regional transmission lines and caused oversupply at times, the ministry said in Document No 1226/BCT-DTDL sent to the National Assembly’s committees for Science, Technology and Environment, and Economic Affairs and the Office of the Government explaining its stance on the power capacity cut.

Additionally, domestic demand for power has fallen below normal levels due to the impact of COVID-19, which led to an oversupply of electricity during off-peak times such as holidays, weekends, and at noon, the ministry said.

According to the ministry, this is a very dangerous situation that adversely affects the safe operation of the national grid. Though the National Load Dispatch Centre (A0) has reduced the output of traditional energy to the minimum, the oversupply remains, so the centre had to make another cut to renewable energy capacity to prevent the electricity system from collapsing.

The ministry has ordered Vietnam Electricity (EVN) and A0 to calculate the required reduction of capacity at all renewable power plants in a transparent and fair manner, regardless of who their investors are.

The ministry added that it has received government approval onthe supplement of various power transmission line projects into planning while urging EVN to fast-track the progress of existing projects to raise the capacity of the national electricity network./. VNA

Renewable energy to become a trend

According to experts, the dominant energy technology in the future will be energy storage devices, solar ….

IEEFA: Renewables should be focus of Vietnam’s Draft PDP8, not coal and gas

Read the Vietnamese translated report here.

Evidence was clear to inform the next stage of Vietnam’s power development

IEEFA

11 March (IEEFA Vietnam): Vietnam’s recently published draft power development plan for 2021-2030 (PDP8) has failed to acknowledge the importance of developing a more flexible system that can accommodate a changing technology mix, according to a new report from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).

“After a decade filled with disappointments from the fossil fuel industry, planners successfully tested the dynamism of renewable energy in Vietnam’s fast-growing market,” says report author IEEFA Director of Energy Finance Studies Asia, Melissa Brown.

“Many conventional coal and gas-power projects failed to progress during the development process, only managing to meet half of the targeted capacity for 2016-2020.

“Solar power developers however over-delivered by five times, and they have done so in a fraction of the time.

“This evidence would surely inform the next stage of Vietnam’s power development.

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Beyond Declining Battery Prices: 6 Ways to Evaluate Energy Storage in 2021

greentechmedia.com

Balance of systems, software, supply chain constraints, and reliability and performance guarantees all weigh on total costs.

Batteries make up only a slice of energy storage system costs. (Credit: Ameren)

Batteries make up only a slice of energy storage system costs. (Credit: Ameren)

The energy storage market in the United States is booming, with 476 megawatts of new projects installed in the third quarter of 2020 alone, up 240 percent over the second quarter, according to industry analysts at Wood Mackenzie. 2021 is expected to be another record-breaking year for storage, but with technological innovation accelerating across the market, renewable energy asset owners need to carefully select safe and reliable systems to protect their storage investments. As the market accelerates, these are a few of the essential questions asset owners should be asking.

1. Evaluate pricing beyond the cell

When analysts speak about declines in storage pricing, they are referring to battery pricing, which continues to decline every year. Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s latest report states that current lithium-ion pricing stands at about $137 per kilowatt-hour and will drop as low as $100 per kWh by 2023.

However, purchasers of energy storage systems may see substantially higher prices for their projects, depending on a range of factors. For example, the lowest pricing for lithium-ion batteries is generally available for either a major supply contract or for very large-scale deployments of 500 megawatt-hours and above. Since most projects today are not that large, that $137 per kWh figure will be closer to $150 to $170 per kWh, and perhaps as high as $200 to $210 per kWh on the battery-pack level, depending on the size of the project.
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Solar power boom poses a distribution challenge

By Dat Nguyen   January 5, 2021 | 08:31 pm GMT+7 vnexpressSolar power boom poses a distribution challengeA worker installs solar power panels in Ninh Thuan Province, central Vietnam. Photo by VnExpress/Quynh Tran.The increasing solar power capacity has made it difficult for national utility Vietnam Electricity (EVN) to ensure stable power distribution nationwide.

The nature of solar power capacity, which accounts for 25 percent of the total, is to produce high volumes during the day and no production in the evening. This poses difficulties for EVN in operating the national grid, the national utility has said in a report.

There have been times when the grid was oversupplied during the low-demand hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. when solar radiation is at peak, the report says.

On the contrary, when power demand is at the highest, the 5:30-6:30 p.m. period, solar power production falls to nearly zero and the traditional power generators have to be mobilized.

“The ratio of renewable power generation is increasing and with it comes instability in operation,” the report says.

Vietnam’s solar power capacity was roughly 16,500 megawatt by the end of last year, nearly 48 percent of it coming from rooftop panels and the rest from plants.

Solar power production reached 10.6 billion kilowatt-hours last year, accounting for 4.3 percent of total.

There was a surge in the number of solar power projects after the government offered an incentive feed-in tariff scheme to promote renewable energy production to meet rising demand in a fast-growing economy.

Vietnam faces transmission conundrum for renewable energy

vnexpress.net

By Anh Minh   September 9, 2020 | 05:45 pm GMT+7

Vietnam faces transmission conundrum for renewable energy

Solar panels seen in a complex in the central Binh Thuan Province. Photo by VnExpress/Tran Trung.

Vietnam’s national grid is ill-equipped to handle the power surge from new renewable energy plants seeking to come online this year.

National utility Vietnam Electricity (EVN) has said in a recent report that the construction of new transmission lines might not be able to match the speed of new solar and wind power projects.

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