In Ho Chi Minh City, officials look beyond income to find the poor

UNDP Vietnam

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As the country’s most prosperous city, the nature of poverty in Ho Chi Minh City has changed over the past decade, as is the case among many of Viet Nam’s middle income neighbours. Photo: Paul Arps / CC2.0

Tiếp tục đọc “In Ho Chi Minh City, officials look beyond income to find the poor”

Changing global patterns of poverty

Loewe, Markus / Nicole Rippin
Briefing Paper 3/2012

Bonn: German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)

die-gdi _ Global patterns of poverty do not look like they did twenty years ago. Many developing countries have been able to raise their average per-capita income over the last two decades; 18 have even trespassed the highly noticed – though arbitrary – ceiling differentiating between ‘low income’ and ‘middle income countries’ (LICs and MICs).

The latter event in particular has attracted much attention has the most populous countries are among those that ‘graduated’ – with the effect that 72 per cent of the extreme income-poor world-wide (defined by the 1.25 USD Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) poverty line) are now living in MICs. Donors increasingly wonder whether development co-operation should therefore focus more on the remaining LICs or rather explore new ways of assisting MICs in poverty alleviation.

We argue that whatever future development co-operation with MICs may look like, poverty eradication should take a central place in it. Even if per-capita income levels are rising in most countries, it is much too early to celebrate the end of global poverty: Tiếp tục đọc “Changing global patterns of poverty”

How Vietnamese villagers beat drinking addiction to end years of poverty

TNN – QUANG TRI – Thursday, November 12, 2015 13:37

Ho E Not, head of a village in central Vietnam, has persuaded everyone to stop drinking to build a better life. Photo: Hoang Tao/VnExpressHo E Not, head of a village in central Vietnam, has persuaded everyone to stop drinking to build a better life. Photo: Hoang Tao/VnExpress

Ho E Not used to beat his wife and their children whenever she refused to give him money for drinking.

“I was tired every time I came from the field and I craved for some alcohol,” Not told news website VnExpress from the central province of Quang Tri.

But one day, 15 years ago, his youngest child kept crying because there was nothing to eat. It hit him hard. He decided to stop drinking. Tiếp tục đọc “How Vietnamese villagers beat drinking addiction to end years of poverty”

World Bank Forecasts Global Poverty to Fall Below 10% for First Time; Major Hurdles Remain in Goal to End Poverty by 2030

October 4, 2015

 Worldbank WASHINGTON, October 4, 2015 – The number of people living in extreme poverty around the world is likely to fall to under 10 percent of the global population in 2015, according to World Bank projections released today, giving fresh evidence that a quarter-century-long sustained reduction in poverty is moving the world closer to the historic goal of ending poverty by 2030.

The Bank uses an updated international poverty line of US $1.90 a day, which incorporates new information on differences in the cost of living across countries (the PPP exchange rates). The new line preserves the real purchasing power of the previous line (of $1.25 a day in 2005 prices) in the world’s poorest countries. Using this new line (as well as new country-level data on living standards), the World Bank projects that global poverty will have fallen from 902 million people or 12.8 per cent of the global population in 2012 to 702 million people, or 9.6 per cent of the global population, this year.
Tiếp tục đọc “World Bank Forecasts Global Poverty to Fall Below 10% for First Time; Major Hurdles Remain in Goal to End Poverty by 2030”

Why trying to help poor countries might actually hurt them

Nobel-winning economist Angus Deaton argues against giving aid to poor countries


Federal Nigerian troops walk along a road to the frontier with Biafray, Oct. 13, 1968. On the roadside two emaciated Nigerian boys suffer from starvation and malnutrition. (AP Photo/Dennis Lee Royle

Washingtonpost – It sounds kind of crazy to say that foreign aid often hurts, rather than helps, poor people in poor countries. Yet that is what Angus Deaton, the newest winner of the Nobel Prize in economics, has argued.

Deaton, an economist at Princeton University who studied poverty in India and South Africa and spent decades working at the World Bank, won his prize for studying how the poor decide to save or spend money. But his ideas about foreign aid are particularly provocative. Deaton argues that, by trying to help poor people in developing countries, the rich world may actually be corrupting those nations’ governments and slowing their growth. According to Deaton, and the economists who agree with him, much of the $135 billion that the world’s most developed countries spent on official aid in 2014 may not have ended up helping the poor. Tiếp tục đọc “Why trying to help poor countries might actually hurt them”