Vietnam’s Champion for Renewable Energy: Q&A with Goldman Prize Winner Khanh Nguy Thi

WRI

Khanh Nguy Thi grew up near a coal plant in Bac Am, a village in northern Vietnam. While Nguy Thi’s lifelong dream was to become a diplomat, the memory of pollution in her hometown pulled her toward work in water conservation and community development.

In 2011, Khanh founded the Green Innovation and Development Centre (GreenID) to promote sustainable energy development in Vietnam. She also started the Vietnam Sustainable Energy Alliance, a network of 11 Vietnamese and international environmental organizations that collaborate on regional energy issues. Continue reading “Vietnam’s Champion for Renewable Energy: Q&A with Goldman Prize Winner Khanh Nguy Thi”

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We calculated how much money trees save for your city

theconversation

Megacities are on the rise. There are currently 47 such areas around the globe, each housing more than 10 million residents.

More than half the global population now lives in urban areas, comprising about 3 percent of the Earth. The ecological footprint of this growth is vast and there’s far more that can be done to improve life for urban residents around the world. Continue reading “We calculated how much money trees save for your city”

Goldman environmental prize: top awards dominated by women for first time

theguardian.com

Winners are all grassroots activists who have taken on powerful vested interests

Goldman environment prizewinners 2018: (clockwise from top left) Manny Calonzo, Francia Márquez, Nguy Thi Khanh, LeAnne Walters, Makoma Lekalakala and Liz McDaid, Claire Nouvian.
 Goldman environment prizewinners 2018: (clockwise from top left) Manny Calonzo, Francia Márquez, Nguy Thi Khanh, LeAnne Walters, Makoma Lekalakala and Liz McDaid, Claire Nouvian. Photograph: 2018 Goldman Environmental Prize

The world’s foremost environmental prize has announced more female winners than ever before, recognising the increasingly prominent role that women are playing in defending the planet.
Continue reading “Goldman environmental prize: top awards dominated by women for first time”

Is Earth’s ozone layer still at risk? 5 questions answered

theconversation

False-color image of ozone concentrations above Antarctica on Oct. 2, 2015. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Editor’s note: Curbing damage to Earth’s protective ozone layer is widely viewed as one of the most important successes of the modern environmental era. Earlier this year, however, a study reported that ozone concentrations in the lower level of the stratosphere had been falling since the late 1990s – even though the Montreal Protocol, a global treaty to phase out ozone-depleting chemicals, had been in effect since 1989. This raised questions about whether and how human activities could still be damaging the ozone layer. Atmospheric chemist A.R. Ravishankara, who co-chaired a United Nations/World Meteorological Organization Scientific Assessment panel on stratospheric ozone from 2007 to 2015, provides perspective. Continue reading “Is Earth’s ozone layer still at risk? 5 questions answered”

Dirty business: The hidden workers who deal with waste in Vietnam’s capital

By Hoang Phuong, Duc Hoang   April 18, 2018 | 09:00 pm GMT+7

Workers collect, classify and recycle all kinds of waste just to earn a little bit extra.

Minh has lived in Hanoi for ten years, but still doesn’t speak fluent Vietnamese.

He comes from an ethnic minority group based in the north of the country, but moved down to the capital to earn a living as a waste disposal worker in a residential building.

Minh does not get the chance to practice his Vietnamese very much because concrete walls separate him from the rest of society, and the only connection he has with other people is a waste pipe.

Minh does not know exactly how old his two sons are. All he knows is that they quit school early to follow him in the waste business.

Continue reading “Dirty business: The hidden workers who deal with waste in Vietnam’s capital”

Minhs wife and older son clean up the bunker of garbage under a residential building in Hanoi. Photo by VnExpress/Do Manh Cuong

Minh’s wife and older son clean up the bunker of garbage under a residential building in Hanoi. Photo by VnExpress/Do Manh Cuong

Evidence mounts for Alzheimer’s, suicide risks among youth in polluted cities

sciencedaily.com

Date: April 13, 2018
Source: The University of Montana
Summary: Researchers have published a new study that reveals increased risks for Alzheimer’s and suicide among children and young adults living in polluted megacities.

FULL STORY

This is pollution haze over Mexico City.
Credit: Lilian Calderón-Garcidueñas

A University of Montana researcher and her collaborators have published a new study that reveals increased risks for Alzheimer’s and suicide among children and young adults living in polluted megacities.

Dr. Lilian Calderón-Garcidueñas said her group studied 203 autopsies of Mexico City residents ranging in age from 11 months to 40 years. Metropolitan Mexico City is home to 24 million people exposed daily to concentrations of fine particulate matter and ozone above U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. The researchers tracked two abnormal proteins that indicate development of Alzheimer’s, and they detected the early stages of the disease in babies less than a year old. Continue reading “Evidence mounts for Alzheimer’s, suicide risks among youth in polluted cities”

How can development cooperation address ocean plastic pollution?

23 January 2018

In the first weeks of 2018 there were (for me) unexpected announcements from both the EU and the UK Government on the urgent global issue of ocean plastic pollution. The EU intends to make all plastic packaging on the European market recyclable by 2030 and in her speech announcing the UK’s 25 Year Environment Plan, Prime Minister Theresa May committed the UK to eliminating all “avoidable plastic waste” by 2042. The Prime Minister also said it would direct UK aid to help developing nations reduce plastic waste, which could indicate a new direction for the UK’s and other countries’ aid programmes.

Continue reading “How can development cooperation address ocean plastic pollution?”

72 Hours in Vietnam: Observations from Craft Recycling Villages

oceanconservancy.org


© COURTESY OF ERIC DESROBERTS

Indigenous Peoples & Local Communities Vital to the Global Environment

IPSnews

Katie Reytar and Peter Veit, World Resources Institute

Indigenous groups and local communities occupy about half the world’s land, but hold legal rights to only a fraction of it. Credit: Michele Solmi/Flickr

WASHINGTON DC, Jan 25 2018 (IPS) – Indigenous Peoples and local communities are some of the best environmental stewards. Their livelihoods and cultures depend on forests, clean water and other natural resources, so they have strong incentives to sustainably manage their lands.

LandMark, the first global platform to provide maps of land held by Indigenous Peoples and local communities, last month released new carbon storage, tree cover loss, natural resource concessions, dam locations and other data layers that shed light on the environment in which these lands exist. Now anyone, anywhere can view and analyze indigenous and local communities’ environmental contributions and identify threats to specific lands. Continue reading “Indigenous Peoples & Local Communities Vital to the Global Environment”

What species is most fit for life? All have an equal chance, scientists say

Sciencedaily.com
Elephants and giant sequoias have no advantage over algae and bacteria

January 8, 2018 Source:SUNY College of Environmental Science and ForestrySummary:There are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them — from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria — has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence.A trio of scientists report that regardless of vastly different body size, location and life history, most species are equally ‘fit’ in the struggle for existence.

There are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them — from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria — has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence.

In a paper published Jan. 8 in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, a trio of scientists from universities in the United States and the United Kingdom describe the dynamic that began with the origin of life on Earth 4 billion years ago. They report that regardless of vastly different body size, location and life history, most plant, animal and microbial species are equally “fit” in the struggle for existence. This is because each transmits approximately the same amount of energy over its lifetime to produce the next generation of its species. Continue reading “What species is most fit for life? All have an equal chance, scientists say”

Critical Issues to Watch in 2018

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ipsnews_Martin Khor is Executive Director of the South Centre, a think tank for developing countries, based in Geneva

More than 480 billion plastic bottles were sold in the world in 2016, in 2018 we can expect international cooperation to reduce the use of plastic and how to treat plastic waste. Credit: Athar Parvaiz/IPS

PENANG, Malaysia, Jan 2 2018 (IPS) – Another new year has dawned, and on a world facing serious disruption on many fronts.  What are the trends and issues to watch out for in 2018?

One obvious answer is to anticipate how Donald Trump, the most unorthodox of American Presidents, will continue to upset the world order.  But more about that later.

Just as importantly as politics, we are now in the midst of several social and environmental trends that have important long-lasting effects.  Some are on the verge of reaching a tipping point, where a long-term trend produces critical and sometimes irreversible events. We may see some of that in 2018.
Continue reading “Critical Issues to Watch in 2018”

Brazil announces end to Amazon mega-dam building policy

Top 10 HAPPY environmental stories of 2017

Mongabay.com

  • Throughout 2017, scientists discovered new populations of rare wildlife, and rediscovered some species that were previously thought to be extinct.
  • Some countries created large marine protected areas, while a few others granted land rights to indigenous communities.
  • In 2017, we also saw the ever-increasing potential of technology to improve conservation monitoring and efforts.

The past year may have seemed like doom and gloom for the environment, but there was plenty to be thankful for. So once again, we bring you some of the happier environmental stories of 2017 (in no particular order). These include rediscoveries of species that were once thought to be extinct, local communities being granted land rights, and the emergence of new technologies that are boosting conservation efforts.

1. New populations of rare wildlife were found

This year, conservationists discovered some new populations of threatened wildlife. Take, for example, the helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil). A research team recorded a new and “unexpectedly rich population” of this critically endangered bird in western Borneo. For a species that is now nearly extinct because of poaching, this discovery boosts hope for its future.

It was good news for the Grauer’s gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) as well. Surveys in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Maiko National Park revealed several previously uncounted individuals of Grauer’s gorillas in just 1 percent of the park. The researchers think that there might be many more gorillas living inside the largely unexplored 10,885-square-kilometer (4,000-square-mile) park. Continue reading “Top 10 HAPPY environmental stories of 2017”

Liệu ô nhiễm không khí đang gây sạt lở đất ở Trung Quốc? – Is air pollution causing landslides in China?

Highlights

• Cracks caused by mining under the potential slide rock mass ruptured the aquiclude.
• Acid rain supplied nutrients to organisms decomposing organic matrix in the shale.
• Acid rain reduced strength of the shale layer on which the failure surface formed.

Continue reading “Liệu ô nhiễm không khí đang gây sạt lở đất ở Trung Quốc? – Is air pollution causing landslides in China?”