Vietnam priorities energy security: Party official

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Head of the Communist Party of Vietnam Central Committee’s Commission for Economic Affairs (R) welcomes former US Secretary of State John Kerry.(Photo: VNA)

Hanoi (VNA) – Vietnam always attaches importance to energy security, considering it a top priority in the country’s energy development policy and strategy, said Nguyen Van Binh, head of the Communist Party of Vietnam Central Committee’s Commission for Economic Affairs.

At a reception for former US Secretary of State John Kerry in Hanoi on January 10, he said Vietnam wants to promote renewable energy development for power generation, contributing to energy security, climate change mitigation, environmental protection and sustainable development. Tiếp tục đọc “Vietnam priorities energy security: Party official”

ASEAN needs to double power capacity in less than 20 years

Meeting demand will take $500 billion worth of new generation facilities

MASAYUKI YUDA, Nikkei staff writer

asia.nikkei_will remain the main source of power generation in ASEAN in the coming decades, says Wood Mackenzie analyst Edi Saputra. © Reuters

TOKYO — ASEAN needs to more than double its power capacity in less than 20 years to meet burgeoning demand. British energy research and consultancy group Wood Mackenzie reported last week that the region requires $500 billion worth of investment to achieve such a goal.

ASEAN, whose current combined GDP is around $2.8 trillion, needs to construct an additional 270 gigawatts of generating capacity by 2035. Current capacity is 209GW. Tiếp tục đọc “ASEAN needs to double power capacity in less than 20 years”

Vietnam needs clean energy strategy

Update: May, 14/2016 – 09:00
Việt Nam needs a strategy on renewable energy development to ensure energy safety in the context of the country’s rapid economic growth and global climate change, said energy experts. – Photo nhandan.com.vn

vietnamnews – HÀ NỘI – Việt Nam needs a strategy on renewable energy development to ensure energy safety in the context of the country’s rapid economic growth and global climate change, said energy experts.

The economic growth rate, high demand of energy consumption, and world hike in the price of fuel have all caused challenges to the country’s energy security.

In fact, Việt Nam has a great potential for developing clean energy sources but the current investment in the field has still been modest.

According to the Energy General Department, Viet Nam was endowed with excellent renewable energy resources throughout the country.

The country has about 2,000-2,500 sunny hours a year, equivalent to 43.9 million tonnes of oil, while the geographic orientation with approximately 3,400km of coastline, provides abundant wind energy at an estimated potential of 800-1,400kW per sq.m. per year.
Tiếp tục đọc “Vietnam needs clean energy strategy”

William J. Perry on nuclear war and nuclear terrorism

thebulletin – On June 26, 1950, North Korea invaded South Korea, beginning an ugly war that resulted in more than a million casualties, and demonstrated to even the most optimistic that a Cold War was seriously underway. That was just two weeks after I got my master’s degree from Stanford, so it is no exaggeration to say that I am a child of the Cold War.

Indeed, throughout my career I always perceived a dark nuclear cloud hanging over my head, threatening no less than the extinction of civilization.

During the Cold War we had a half dozen nuclear crises, of which the Cuban Missile Crisis was the most dangerous, and I was close enough to these crises that they made a deep personal impression on me. I believed then, and I believe to this day, that we got through these crises and avoided a nuclear catastrophe as much by good luck as by good management. Tiếp tục đọc “William J. Perry on nuclear war and nuclear terrorism”

New Energy, New Geopolitics: Balancing Stability and Leverage

An assessment of how shale gas and tight oil in the United States is impacting energy, geopolitical and national security dynamics around the world.

CSIS – In early 2013, the CSIS Energy and National Security Program and the Harold Brown Chair in Defense Policy Studies assembled a broad multi-functional team to explore how shale gas and tight oil in the United States is impacting energy, geopolitical and national security dynamics around the world, with the intention of providing policymakers with a structured way to consider the potential risks and rewards of the new shale gas and tight oil resources.

The result was the report, “New Energy, New Geopolitics: Balancing Stability and Leverage” which concludes:

  • Shale gas and tight oil have had important impacts on the global energy sector. It has changed energy trade flows, altered the investment outlook for energy projects, reordered the climate change debate, and has helped change the energy posture of the United States, to name a few.
  • To date, the broader geopolitical impacts have remained limited. The uncertain trajectory of U.S. production, and even more uncertain, the potential for global production, make anticipating future impacts difficult.
  • So far, perception leads reality when it comes to geopolitical and national security impacts. Many countries are acting on early interpretations of the shale gas and tight oil trend.
  • A U.S. strategy for how to incorporate shale gas and tight oil developments into its current energy and national security strategies is still evolving. Going forward, U.S. policymakers face a choice between two strategic paths for managing shale gas and tight oil resources: “energy stability” or “energy leverage.”
  • This report concludes that “energy stability” is the most prudent and robust approach against a range of potential energy futures and recommends that the United States pursue policies that hew more closely to an “energy-stability” approach.

In addition to the summary for policymakers and report, CSIS will publish three contributing reports- one on energy, one on geopolitics and national security, and one of scenarios, strategies and pathways. These contributing reports will offer greater detail to the analysis provided in “New Energy, New Geopolitics: Balancing Stability and Leverage.” Tiếp tục đọc “New Energy, New Geopolitics: Balancing Stability and Leverage”

Germany Could Make $2 Billion By Exporting Electricity

November 10th, 2015 by

cleantecnica – The Fraunhofer Institute has found that Germany made about €1.7 billion, or $1.93 billion, in 2014 by selling surplus electricity. In 2015, that amount could reach €2 billion or $2.2 billion. Germany may also achieve a record export surplus of 40 TWh of electricity in 2015. “Over the past years, Germany was able to secure higher prices for its electricity exports than it paid for electricity imports,” explained Fraunhofer professor, Bruno Burger.

germancliffsRenewables added 118 TWh of energy production capacity in Germany from the period beginning in 2010 through 2014. What are some of Germany’s other exports? According to one source, Germany exported about $2.6 billion in pharmaceuticals to Japan in 2014. In 2007, cheese exports were about €2.7 billion. Tiếp tục đọc “Germany Could Make $2 Billion By Exporting Electricity”

What Will the U.S. Energy Industry Look Like Over the Next Five Years?

Experts discuss shale’s impact on prices, where OPEC is headed, and other topics

The U.S. shale-oil boom and OPEC’s actions will factor into energy prices and renewables.
The U.S. shale-oil boom and OPEC’s actions will factor into energy prices and renewables. Photo: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

WSJ – Low fuel prices and new climate policies are rapidly transforming the American energy sector, while escalating wars in the Middle East and a nuclear deal with Iran are clouding the global oil picture.

To get a sense of what the energy future may hold, The Wall Street Journal reached out to three experts in energy and geopolitics: Amy Myers Jaffe, executive director of energy and sustainability at the University of California, Davis; Sarah Emerson, principal at ESAI Energy and president of Energy Security Analysis Inc.; and Meghan O’Sullivan, the Jeane Kirkpatrick professor of the practice of international affairs and director of the Geopolitics of Energy Project at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. Here are edited excerpts.

One-year outlook

WSJ: What will the U.S. energy industry look like a year from now if low oil and gas prices persist? Tiếp tục đọc “What Will the U.S. Energy Industry Look Like Over the Next Five Years?”

India’s Energy Crisis