Vietnam marks 50 years since U.S. massacre at My Lai

QUANG NGAI, Vietnam (Reuters) – Vietnam marked 50 years since the My Lai massacre on Friday in a memorial ceremony at the site of the killings that was attended by survivors of the massacre, their families, and around 60 U.S. Vietnam War veterans and anti-war activists.


Performers take part during the 50th anniversary of the My Lai massacre in My Lai village, Vietnam March 16, 2018. REUTERS/Kham

American soldiers killed 504 people on March 16, 1968, in Son My, a collection of hamlets between the central Vietnamese coast and a ridge of misty mountains, in an incident known in the West as the My Lai Massacre.

Tiếp tục đọc “Vietnam marks 50 years since U.S. massacre at My Lai”

Advertisements

Cựu binh Mỹ và 23 năm đi hàn gắn vết thương chiến tranh

04/03/2018 11:32 GMT+7
TTOCùng thời điểm sự kiện tàu sân bay Mỹ USS Carl Vinson đến Đà Nẵng, một cựu binh Mỹ lặng lẽ sắp xếp cho một nhóm 40 cựu binh Mỹ đi dọc Việt Nam 17 ngày để tìm hiểu về chất độc da cam và bom mìn còn sót lại.
Cựu binh Mỹ và 23 năm đi hàn gắn vết thương chiến tranh - Ảnh 1.

Chuck Searcy trò chuyện với các chuyên gia rà phá bom mìn người Việt ở Quảng Trị – Ảnh: NVCC

“Chuyến thăm không phải để ôn lại những ký ức đau thương mà là hàn gắn lại những vết thương chưa lành” – Chuck Searcy, một cựu binh Mỹ 73 tuổi, nói.

Tiếp tục đọc “Cựu binh Mỹ và 23 năm đi hàn gắn vết thương chiến tranh”

US army veteran returns to Viet Nam to heal scars of war

vietnamnews

Update: August, 14/2017 – 10:13

Chuck Searcy, Vice President of Project RENEW and Co-chair of the Agent Orange Working Group. — Photo pbs.org

Việt Nam News reporter Hoàng Anh talks to Chuck Searcy, Vice President of Project RENEW and Co-chair of the Agent Orange Working Group.


When did you come to Việt Nam and what motivated your decision?

The first time I came to Việt Nam was in 1967, as a 20-year-old soldier in the US Army. The year I spent in the war had a profound impact on me. That experience made me hate war. I saw the lies used by the US government to win support from the American people to continue the war, and I saw the death and destruction, the pain and the sorrow being caused to American families, but especially the terrible and tragic costs to the Vietnamese people. When I left the war zone in 1968, I knew that someday I would return – and I hoped it would be in a time of peace and recovery for Việt Nam. Tiếp tục đọc “US army veteran returns to Viet Nam to heal scars of war”

Cựu chiến binh Mỹ Chuck Searcy: “Phòng thủ vĩ đại nhất của Việt Nam chính là ý chí của người dân”

BH – Cựu chiến binh Mỹ Chuck Searcy đã từng tham gia Chiến tranh Việt Nam, nhưng sau Chiến tranh, ông đã quay lại, cùng với người dân Việt Nam, xây dựng đất nước và luôn khuyến khích chúng ta hãy độc tập và đề phòng các nguy cơ khi hợp tác với các quốc gia khác, đặc biệt là Trung Quốc và Hoa Kỳ.

US' Vietnam War Veteran for Peace Vice President Chuck Searcy poses for a photo near shells of bombs which used by US airforce during Vietnam War, which displaying at the Army museum in Hanoi January 19, 2015. Photo by Peter Nguyen

Hôm nay ngày 30/4, chúng tôi có một cuộc phỏng vấn ông Chuck Searcy để nhìn nhận lại các bài học lịch sử trong quá khứ và hướng tới tương lai. Tiếp tục đọc “Cựu chiến binh Mỹ Chuck Searcy: “Phòng thủ vĩ đại nhất của Việt Nam chính là ý chí của người dân””

The Lethal Legacy of the Vietnam War

Fifty years after the first US troops came ashore at Da Nang, the Vietnamese are still coping with unexploded bombs and Agent Orange.

By George Black
The Nation
February 25, 2015

On a mild, sunny morning last November, Chuck Searcy and I drove out along a spur of the old Ho Chi Minh Trail to the former Marine base at Khe Sanh, which sits in a bowl of green mountains and coffee plantations in Vietnam’s Quang Tri province, hard on the border with Laos. The seventy-seven-day siege of Khe Sanh in early 1968, coinciding with the Tet Offensive, was the longest battle of what Vietnamese call the American War and a pivotal event in the conflict. By the off-kilter logic of Saigon and Washington, unleashing enough technology and firepower to produce a ten-to-one kill ratio was a metric of success, but the televised carnage of 1968, in which 16,592 Americans died, was too much for audiences back home. After Tet and Khe Sanh, the war was no longer America’s to win, only to avoid losing. Tiếp tục đọc “The Lethal Legacy of the Vietnam War”