What are the political drivers for GMOs in developing countries?

Each genetically modified rice plant in the greenhouses at CropDesign has a barcode and transponder, allowing it to be accurately identified at any time. Photo by: BASF / CC BY-NC-ND

CANBERRA — In developing nations across the globe, governments are grappling with questions of what role, if any, genetically modified organisms should play in helping address a range of agriculture, nutrition, and climate challenges.

 

Concerns have been raised over the environmental and health impacts of GMOs, as well as their impact on traditional farming methods and issues around seed patents, and farmers having to be dependent on corporations.

Governments of developing countries are responding to those concerns in a variety of ways with some banning GMOs outright, some embracing them, and others attempting to find balance between the concerns and needs of all sides.

Developing countries are slowly increasing approved legislation and opening the door to research and commercialization of GMO crops. As these countries seek to expand their export markets, improve domestic living conditions, and address food insecurity in the wake of conflict and climate change, some are seeing a solution in genetically engineered crops. Continue reading “What are the political drivers for GMOs in developing countries?”

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Heroin, Nazis, and Agent Orange: Inside the $66 Billion Merger of the Year

These companies used to sell heroin and Agent Orange. Now, they want to form the world’s largest supplier of seeds and pesticides.

BB – September 15, 2016 — 12:09 AM ICT

Two giants of the farming and chemical industries agreed to merge Wednesday in a $66 billion deal: the U.S.’s Monsanto and Germany’s Bayer, the original maker of aspirin. Continue reading “Heroin, Nazis, and Agent Orange: Inside the $66 Billion Merger of the Year”

Bayer Makes $62 Billion Bid for Monsanto

Combination would create one of the world’s largest agrochemical businesses
By Christopher Alessi

Bayer said the $122-a-share offer represents ‘value at a substantial premium’ for Monsanto shareholdersUpdated May 23, 2016 8:59 a.m. ET

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wsj – FRANKFURT—German pharmaceutical and chemicals giant Bayer AG on Monday said it made an all-cash offer to acquire Monsanto Co. for $62 billion, valuing the U.S. company at a substantial premium in a deal that would create the world’s largest agrochemicals company.

Bayer, which confirmed last week that it had approached Monsanto about a takeover, said the $122-a-share bid values Monsanto at 37% over its closing share price of $89.03 on May 9, the day before Bayer made a written proposal to the U.S. company.
Continue reading “Bayer Makes $62 Billion Bid for Monsanto”