Asian Views on America’s Role in Asia: The Future of the Rebalance

The 2016 election campaign has revealed mounting concern and skepticism about American foreign policy commitments towards Asia, including signals towards anti-globalization and isolationism. Concerns have been raised about free trade and investment, the rise of China, territorial disputes, nuclear proliferation, and America’s presence in Afghanistan. The United States must not shrink from its leadership role in the international order and skillfully navigate a complex set of issues in Asia, according to a forthcoming policy report, Asian Views on America’s Role in Asia. This report presents policy recommendations for the incoming administration on issues most important to three sub-regions of Northeast Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. The recommendations culminate a series of closed-door, high-level working group meetings held in Seoul, Bangkok, Colombo, and New York from April to June of 2016.

Posted November 14, 2016

NEW ASIAN INFRASTRUCTURE AND INVESTMENT BANK BREAKS GROUND: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

January 27, 2016

HeadshotsThe newly created Asian Infrastructure and Investment Bank (AIIB) officially opened at a ceremony in Beijing on January 16. In Asiaeditor Alma Freeman spoke with The Asia Foundation’s International Development Cooperation program director, Anthea Mulakala, to find out what makes the bank unique, implications for development approaches, and how the bank could address Asia’s infrastructure deficit.

What is the AIIB, and how is it different from other multilateral banks like the World Bank or the Asian Development Bank?

Tiếp tục đọc “NEW ASIAN INFRASTRUCTURE AND INVESTMENT BANK BREAKS GROUND: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW”

Vietnam Then and Now

August 26, 2015

This article was adapted from a speech presented at “Advancing Prosperity: U.S.-Vietnam Development Cooperation,” a celebration in Hanoi organized in conjunction with a visit by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

Michael DiGregorio speaking at "Advancing Prosperity: U.S.-Vietnam Development Cooperation."

In the early years of Renovation (Doi Moi), at a time when the market economy was just beginning to gain a foothold, Hanoi was a much greener city than it is today. Nearly all the fruits and vegetables, meats, and fish consumed here were produced in the suburbs and sold fresh in the city’s public markets. Within the city, Ho Tay and Bay Mau lakes produced hundreds of tons of fish per year. South of the city, a network of large lakes that also served as the city’s wastewater treatment system produced hundreds more. There were hardly any cars on the roads, and hardly any gas stations or motorcycle repair shops either. All the motorcycles were new, and the few large trucks that produced plumes of diesel fumes were regarded as a nuisance. The air was so clear in those days that the mountains west of the city were visible much of the year. They are a rare sight now. Tiếp tục đọc “Vietnam Then and Now”