Năng lượng trong biến đổi khí hậu: Giải pháp cho Việt Nam ?

TS – 30/11/2021 07:30 –

Cho đến nay, ngay cả những quốc gia tiên tiến về KH&CN vẫn chưa có giải pháp nào coi là hoàn hảo về một nguồn năng lượng xanh không phát thải carbon.


TS. Trần Chí Thành là một chuyên gia về công nghệ hạt nhân và an toàn hạt nhân. Ảnh: Thanh Nhàn.

Tuy nhiên, ngay cả khi không tồn tại giải pháp nào hoàn hảo thì vẫn có những lựa chọn tối ưu – nghĩa là vừa đảm bảo an ninh năng lượng mà vẫn hạn chế phát thải, TS. Trần Chí Thành, Viện trưởng Viện Năng lượng nguyên tử Việt Nam, cho biết như vậy qua góc nhìn của một chuyên gia về công nghệ hạt nhân và an toàn hạt nhân.

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China, India, other big coal users missing from COP26 phase-out deal

reuters.com

By Kate Abnett and Elizabeth Piper

Summary

  • Poland, Indonesia sign up to phase out coal
  • China, India, U.S., Australia not included
  • COP26 mini deals aim to add up to big climate win

GLASGOW, Nov 4 (Reuters) – Indonesia, Poland, Vietnam and other nations pledged on Thursday to phase out use of coal-fired power and stop building plants, but their deal at the COP26 climate summit failed to win support from China, India and other top coal consumers.

Britain has said one of its main aims for the United Nations summit is “consigning coal power to history”. The deal saw 23 nations making new commitments, a move the president of the COP26 summit, Alok Sharma, said put the end of coal “in sight”.https://17f4ab6d574607e1c63d4da62d7a4666.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

“Today I think we can say that the end of coal is in sight,” Sharma told the Glasgow meeting.

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More than 40 countries agree to phase out coal-fired power

theguardian.com

Critics say pledge to end use of dirtiest fuel source in 2030s and 40s does not go far enough

Steam and smoke rise from Bełchatów power station in Poland.
Steam and smoke rise from Bełchatów power station in Poland, one of the countries that has agreed to phase out coal-fired power. Photograph: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Fiona HarveyJillian Ambrose and Patrick Greenfield in GlasgowWed 3 Nov 2021 22.30 GMT

More than 40 countries have agreed to phase out their use of coal-fired power, the dirtiest fuel source, in a boost to UK hopes of a deal to “keep 1.5C alive”, from the Cop26 climate summit.

Major coal-using countries, including Canada, Poland, South Korea, Ukraine, Indonesia and Vietnam, will phase out their use of coal for electricity generation, with the bigger economies doing so in the 2030s, and smaller economies doing so in the 2040s.

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Old Coal Mines Can Win a Second Life as Green Energy Hotspots

bloomberg.com

By Rob Verdonck +Follow18 December 2020, 11:14 GMT+7

  •  Study examines turning coal operations into pumped hydro sites
  •  Other projects aim to add wind, solar at shuttered mines
Genex Power’s 50-megawatt solar farm at the disused Kidston mine.
Genex Power’s 50-megawatt solar farm at the disused Kidston mine. Photographer: Genex

Australia is studying plans to transform a disused underground coal mine into a pumped hydro facility, part of a wider effort to reuse retiring fossil fuel sites for renewable energy generation.

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COP26: 40 countries agree to phase out coal-fired power

By Zachary Skidmore04 Nov 2021 (Last Updated November 4th, 2021 11:39) Power Technology

More than 40 countries have agreed at COP26 to phase out their use of coal power by 2040 at the latest.

COP26: 40 countries agree to phase out coal-fired power

More than 40 countries have agreed to phase out coal-fired power at the COP26 climate summit. The agreement includes 18 countries promising to phase out or stop investments in new coal-fired plants domestically and internationally for the first time.

The list includes major coal using countries, including Canada, Poland, Ukraine, and Vietnam. Signatories to the agreement have committed to phasing out coal power in the 2030s for major economies and the 2040s for poorer nations. Dozens of private organisations have also signed up to the pledge, with HSBC and Export Development Canada among several major banks agreeing to divest from the coal industry.

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IEEFA: Defying global financial trends, Vietnam pivots back to coal power

Bản tiếng Việt >>

Thu Vu and Press Release September 29, 2021

Latest draft power development plan puts clean energy transition at risk by sacrificing renewables for more coal

29 September (IEEFA Vietnam): In the lead up to the United Nations Climate Change Conference COP26, President Xi Jinping recently declared that China will no longer build new coal-fired power projects abroad. Despite limited details, the ramifications of China’s coal exit strategy for coal-centric developing economies like Vietnam could be immense.

The ramifications of China’s coal exit for coal-centric developing economies could be immense

Before President Xi’s announcement, Vietnam’s latest draft Power Development Master Plan 8 (PDP8) was released, and in a surprising shift, proposed to raise the installed capacity target for coal-fired power by 3 gigawatts (GW) to 40GW by 2030, with an additional (and final) 10GW to be deployed by 2035.

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China’s Commitment to Stop Overseas Financing of New Coal Plants in Perspective

CSIS.org

September 24, 2021

On September 21, 2021, Chinese president Xi Jinping announced at the United Nations General Assembly debate that China would not build any new coal-fired power plants abroad and would step up its support for developing green and low-carbon energy in developing countries. He also reiterated the country’s goal to become carbon neutral by 2060 and peak carbon emissions by 2030, targets which he had first announced last year. This new announcement sets the tone for the upcoming UN climate change conference, COP26, which will be held in Glasgow in early November.

Q1: Why does this new climate commitment matter?

A1: Xi Jinping’s speech at last year’s UN General Assembly was noteworthy because it set a timeline for China’s decarbonization. However, in addition to not specifying a peak level of emissions, it also left unanswered the question of whether the country would shoulder the responsibility for climate action outside its borders. China’s role as the largest public financier of coal projects globally has come into particular focus this past year as other governments, such as the G7 members, have pledged to slash their public financing of such projects. There were multiple calls from the international community, including U.S. special envoy for climate John Kerry, for China to end its support for coal projects globally.

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South Korea and Japan Will End Overseas Coal Financing. Will China Catch Up?

WRI.org

Since 2013, public finance from China, Japan and South Korea accounted for more than 95% of total foreign financing toward coal-fired power plants. This financing enabled the construction and operation of coal power plants in developing countries, where investment in power supply does not match demand. These investments also came at a time when the global carbon budget was already overstretched.

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China key to Vietnam’s solar success

Chinadialogue.net

A rapid rise in Vietnam’s solar power has been boosted by Chinese finance and technology, but more support is still going to fossil fuels

Solar energy in Vietnam has grown rapidly since 2018, supported by Chinese finance and technology (Image: Alamy)Solar energy in Vietnam has grown rapidly since 2018, supported by Chinese finance and technology (Image: Alamy)

Linh Pham

June 30, 2021

Vietnam has been a Southeast Asia solar success story. It went from having barely any generation in 2018 to a quarter of its total installed capacity being solar – a 100-fold increase in two years.

This rapid growth is mainly down to the Vietnamese government’s feed-in tariff which provides a guaranteed above-market price for renewable energy producers; other incentives signed off in 2017 in an attempt to pivot away from lagging fossil fuel projects; and cheaper solar panels, some of which are assembled domestically.

Around 99% of the installed solar panels in Vietnam come from China. At the same time, China is one of the few countries that still lends Vietnam money to build coal plants.

China’s future role in Vietnam’s power system will be shaped by the latter’s newest plan for its power sector. The final version of the Power Development Plan 8 is due to be published in June, though it has been postponed before and may be again.

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Asia’s new coal plant plans jeopardize climate targets, report says

China, India, Indonesia, Japan and Vietnam plan to build more than 600 new coal-fired power projects, with a combined capacity of more than 300 gigawatts. Most would prove uneconomical and the new plants would put international climate goals out of reach.

By Reuters   June 30, 2021 | 08:37 am GMT+7 VNExpressAsia's new coal plant plans jeopardize climate targets, report saysA coal power plant in Vietnam’s northern province of Thai Binh in 2019. photo by VnExpress/Gia Chinh.

Five Asian countries including Vietnam are responsible for 80 percent of new coal power plants planned around the world, the Carbon Tracker group said on Wednesday.

China, India, Indonesia, Japan and Vietnam plan to build more than 600 new coal-fired power projects, with a combined capacity of more than 300 gigawatts, the group said, adding most would prove uneconomical and the new plants would put international climate goals out of reach.

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Vietnam needs coal-fired plants for 15 years at least

By Duc Minh   March 19, 2021 | 10:14 am GMT+7 VNExpressVietnam needs coal-fired plants for 15 years at leastVinh Tan Power Plant 4 in the central province of Binh Thuan. Photo by Shutterstock/pDang86.Despite the associated environmental problems, Vietnam cannot do without coal-fired power plants for another 15 years at least, experts say.

There is no current alternative that can help Vietnam ensure energy security and maintain stable prices, they add.

There are several coal-fired plants in the pipeline, set to be be built by 2025, including the Nam Dinh 1 and Thai Binh 2 in northern Vietnam, and even after 2035 the country will still need a small number of coal-fired plants to keep prices from rising too high, the Institute of Energy says in a comment on the country’s latest energy development plan.

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Samsung targeted by NGOs for proposal to build coal power station in Vietnam

Famous for innovation in consumer electronics and a progressive approach to sustainability, Samsung has been called out by NGOs for links to the construction of the controversial Vung Ang 2 coal-fired power plant in Vietnam.
News that electronics giant Samsung’s construction arm could be building a controversial coal-fired power station in Vietnam has surprised environmentalists, and prompted a campaign that highlights the environmental and social impact of the project.News emerged on Monday (10 August) that Samsung Construction & Trading (C&T) is considering participation in the 1,200 megawatt Vung Ang 2 coal project in Vietnam’s Ha Tinh province.

The proposed plant has been repeatedly targeted by NGOs in recent years for its potential to pollute and exacerbate the climate crisis, and a number of companies including Standard Chartered BankOCBC Bank and DBS have withdrawn from Vung Ang 2, citing conflicts with tightened climate policies.

Campaigners have also pointed out that Vung Ang 2 has air pollution standards far lower than those in Korea, which is one of the world’s biggest investors in overseas coal projects.

A collective of green groups including Greenpeace, Solutions for Our Climate and Market Forces said in a campaign due to run in international media this week that Samsung’s involvement in Vung Ang 2 goes against group-level sustainability pledges, which include reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and will tarnish the company’s brand image.

“Innovation is such a big focus for Samsung. It seems odd that a company so focused on building the next new thing wants to build 19th century technology,” Bernadette Maheandiran, a researcher for investments watchdog Market Forces, told Eco-Business.

The campaign launches less than a month after environmental protests prompted Samsung Securities, the conglomerate’s financial investment arm, to withdraw from the Adani Abbot Point coal terminal in Australia. Prostesters had called for a boycott of Samsung products. Tiếp tục đọc “Samsung targeted by NGOs for proposal to build coal power station in Vietnam”

Vietnam increases coal import for thermal power activities

vietnamnet 14/08/2020    15:44 GMT+7

Vietnam has increasingly imported coal and crude oil during the social distancing period for thermal power plants.

Statistics from the General Department of Vietnam Customs show that in July, Vietnam imported nearly 4.4 million tonnes of coal at the cost of VND1.4m (USD60) a tonne. In the first seven months, Vietnam imported a total of 36 million tonnes for USD2.5bn.

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Vietnam coal consumption growth among world’s fastest

vnexpress.net

By Dat Nguyen   July 20, 2020 | 05:52 pm GMT+7

Vietnam coal consumption growth among world’s fastest

Workers pick out gravel from coal at a coal port in Hanoi. Photo by Reuters/Kham.

Vietnam posted the highest growth in coal consumption among the top 10 global consumers last year, a report found.

The country consumed 2.07 exajoules of electricity from coal last year, up 30.2 percent year-on-year, according to the “BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2020” report by energy firm BP.

Lỗ hổng an ninh năng lượng – 5 bài

Trong 3 năm trở lại đây, đầu tư cho ngành năng lượng, gồm điện – than – dầu khí, suy giảm đã tạo ra khoảng trống, gây áp lực lớn lên an ninh năng lượng của nước ta. Với một nền kinh tế có tốc độ tăng trưởng cao, liên tục, để thoát “bẫy thu nhập trung bình”, thì an ninh năng lượng phải là trụ cột trong chính sách phát triển, chứ không thể là “gót chân Asin” của nền kinh tế.

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