Indonesian environment ministry ends WWF partnership amid public spat

Southeast Asia in 2020: Issues to Watch, Part 1

CSIS.org

January 14, 2020

In this two-part series, Dr. Amy Searight, senior adviser and director of the CSIS Southeast Asia Program, previews five key issues to watch in Southeast Asia in 2020. This installment addresses U.S.-ASEAN relations, climate change and the imperiled Mekong, and domestic politics. The next installment will cover economic trends and developments in the digital space.

Can Trump Reset U.S.-ASEAN Relations?

Disappointingly, 2019 was a pretty bad year for U.S.-ASEAN relations. Trump had a promising start in his first year in office, hosting four Southeast Asian leaders in the White House, traveling to Vietnam and the Philippines to unveil his “Free and Open Indo-Pacific” vision, and holding a U.S.-ASEAN summit. But Trump’s interest in Southeast Asia has since appeared to wane considerably. Although Trump traveled to Vietnam in February for a second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, he later called Vietnam the “single worst abuser” in trade relations with the United States. In November, President Trump skipped the East Asian Summit (EAS) for the third straight year, sending National Security Advisor Robert O’Brien instead. Trump’s absence in Bangkok and the historically low level of diplomatic representation at the summit ruffled a lot of feathers within ASEAN and led most of the Southeast Asian leaders to snub the U.S.-ASEAN summit held on the sidelines of the EAS (only Thailand, Vietnam, and Laos attended at the leader level). ASEAN’s disenchantment with the level of U.S. engagement came just as China was gaining new traction in the region, with a revamped Belt and Road Initiative that appeared to address regional concerns and progress toward launching the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), a trade agreement between ASEAN, China, and four other regional trade partners.
Tiếp tục đọc “Southeast Asia in 2020: Issues to Watch, Part 1”

ASEAN Outlook on the Indo-Pacific

ASEAN

The AsiaPacific and Indian Ocean regions are amongst the most dynamic in the world as well as centers of economic growth for decadesAs a result, these regions continue to experience geopolitical and geostrategic shiftsThese shifts present opportunities as well as challengesOn the one hand, the economic growth of the region opens up possibilities of cooperation to alleviate poverty and elevate living standards of millions of peopleOn the other hand, the rise of material powers, i.eeconomic and military, requires avoiding the deepening of mistrust, miscalculation, and patterns of behavior based on a zerosum game.

Download the full statement here.

Châu Á vẫn mê than

nhipcaudautu – Thứ Hai | 02/09/2019 08:00


Ảnh: tinkinhte.com

Chính phủ các nước, đặc biệt tại châu Á, vẫn tiếp tục đổ tiền vào than đá, tác nhân lớn nhất gây biến đổi khí hậu.

Trước hệ lụy khó lường của biến đổi khí hậu, những thông tin về vị thế ngày càng suy giảm của than đá đã làm dấy lên tia hy vọng về một tương lai bớt u ám hơn của thế giới. Ngày càng nhiều quốc gia muốn giảm dần việc sử dụng than đá và tiến tới xóa bỏ hoàn toàn, một phần nhờ khí đốt giá rẻ và chi phí năng lượng gió và mặt trời giảm mạnh.

Tiếp tục đọc “Châu Á vẫn mê than”

Maritime Claims of the Indo-Pacific

September 3, 2019  |  AMTI Interactive

Maritime Claims of the Indo-Pacific

AMTI has expanded and improved its interactive Maritime Claims of the Indo-Pacific map to include all the Pacific Islands and more. The database of nearly 40 countries in South Asia, East Asia, and the Pacific is the most comprehensive and accurate resource on maritime claims available to the public. Users can search claimants by name or select up to six from a list of available countries. Claim types can be toggled on or off, including territorial baselines, territorial seas, exclusive economic zones, continental shelves, and the nine-dash/U-shaped line.

All claims are shown based on states’ domestic legislation, treaties, and submissions to international bodies. The map is an unbiased depiction of claims; it does not judge their legality or guess at future delimitations. Users can click on any claim line for its source, including links to original documents where available. Details on methodology are available below the map.

Recent Analysis

Stop the Bully in the South China Sea by Greg Poling and Murray Hiebert

Duterte’s Game in Beijing by Richard Heydarian

Balancing Law and Realpolitik in the South China Sea by Lucio Blanco Pitlo III

Vietnam’s Uphill Battle in the South China Sea: A Need for More International Actors by Nguyen Thanh Trung

China’s Incursion into Vietnam’s EEZ and Lessons from the Past by Huong Le Thu

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The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) is a bipartisan, nonprofit organization founded in 1962 and headquartered in Washington, D.C. It seeks to advance global security and prosperity by providing strategic insights and policy solutions to decisionmakers.

China could overwhelm US military in Asia in hours, Australian report says

The study by the United States Study Center, at the University of Sydney, in Australia, warned that America’s defense strategy in the Indo-Pacific region “is in the throes of an unprecedented crisis” and could struggle to defend its allies against China.

Tiếp tục đọc “China could overwhelm US military in Asia in hours, Australian report says”

The Asian Century Is Over

Beset by conflicts, stagnating economies, and political troubles, the region no longer looks set to rule the world.

Chinese flags are displayed in Chaoyang Park in Beijing on Sept. 30, 2006.

The air forces of four of Asia’s leading powers nearly came to blows in the skies over the Sea of Japan, or East Sea, last week. As Russia and China conducted their first joint aerial patrol, South Korean fighters fired more than 300 warning shots at a Russian command and control aircraft that crossed into South Korea’s air defense identification zone. Meanwhile, Japanese fighters scrambled in case Japanese territory came under fire. Tiếp tục đọc “The Asian Century Is Over”

A Rising China Is Driving the U.S. Army’s New Game Plan in the Pacific

New missiles and large-scale exercises part of long-term strategy to deter Beijing.

Idaho Army National Guard and Montana Army National Guard Soldiers from the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conduct a live-fire exercise with Royal Thai Army Soldiers at the Cavalry Center in Thailand’s Saraburi province on Aug. 28, 2018. (Department of Defense Photo)

Idaho Army National Guard and Montana Army National Guard Soldiers from the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conduct a live-fire exercise with Royal Thai Army Soldiers at the Cavalry Center in Thailand’s Saraburi province on Aug. 28, 2018. (Department of Defense Photo)

FORT SHAFTER, Hawaii—As an organization based solidly on dry land, the U.S. Army’s increasing focus on the Pacific might seem puzzling to some.

But with China continuing to expand its military, building islands in the South China Sea, and spreading fear among neighbors, the Army wants to up its game in the region with more firepower and additional rotations of U.S. troops—not only to reassure key U.S. allies such as Japan, South Korea, and Thailand that the United States has their back, but also to prevent a potential war.

“China is the priority,” said Gen. Robert Brown, U.S. Army Pacific commander, during a March 19 roundtable with a handful of reporters at Fort Shafter in Hawaii. Tiếp tục đọc “A Rising China Is Driving the U.S. Army’s New Game Plan in the Pacific”

GLOBAL ECONOMY-Growing China downdraft chills Asia factory activity

* China factory activity remains in contraction territory

Japan, Vietnam PMI slumps as China slowdown hits

* South Korean exports contract at steepest pace in nearly 3 yrs

* Weak readings add pressure on central banks, China, for stimulus

By Leika Kihara

TOKYO, March 1 (Reuters) – Weak demand in China and growing global fallout from the Sino-U.S. trade war took a heavier toll on factories across much of Asia in February, business surveys showed on Friday.

Activity in China’s vast manufacturing sector contracted for the third straight month, pointing to more strains on its major trading partners and raising questions over whether Beijing needs to do more to stabilise the slowing economy.

In many cases, business conditions were the worst Asian companies have faced since 2016, with demand weakening not only in China but globally. Tiếp tục đọc “GLOBAL ECONOMY-Growing China downdraft chills Asia factory activity”

The State of Southeast Asia 2019

Download report >>

Abstract: The ASEAN Studies Centre at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute conducted the “State of Southeast Asia: 2019” online survey between 18 November and 5 December 2018 to seek the views of Southeast Asians onregional affairs. The survey used the purposive sampling method, canvassing views from a total of 1,008 Southeast Asians who are regional experts and stakeholders from the policy, research, business, civil society, and media communities. As such, the results of this survey are not meant to be representative. Rather, it aims to present a general view of prevailing attitudes among those in a position to inform or influence policy on regional political, economic and social issues and concerns.

The survey is divided into five sections.

The first section sketches out the nationality and affiliation of the respondents.

Section II explores the political and economic outlook for 2019, as well as providing views on major developments in the year ahead and security concerns. Some of the issues covered in this section include the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), the US-China trade war, denuclearisation in the Korean Peninsula and Rohingya issue.

Section III examines major power relations in the region, with a specific focus on the US and China.

Section IV looks into the region’s perception of the major powers (China, the European Union, India, Japan, Russia and the US) and provides some clues as to which major power does the region trust the most (or the least).

The survey concludes with Section V which looks at three aspects of soft power – tertiary education, tourism and foreign language – as proxies of the major powers’ influence in Southeast Asia.

Narcos: the hidden drug highways linking Asia and Latin America

NOVEMBER 24, 2018 SCMP


RAQUEL CARVALHO


MARCELO DUHALDE

As Chinese gangs, Latin American cartels and Nigerian brokers widen their international networks, a rising number of vulnerable women and children are being tangled in their web.

It was one of those hot summer days in early August when the skin has no rest from the burning sun, drier than usual. Daniela, from Venezuela, was landing for the first time in Hong Kong, wearing a black jacket, white shirt, bell-bottomed jeans, and high heels. Tiếp tục đọc “Narcos: the hidden drug highways linking Asia and Latin America”

2019: The Year Ahead in Asia

January 2, 2019 By The Asia Foundation

Happy New Year, and welcome to the first edition of InAsia for 2019. In our last issue we looked at some of our top stories from the year just ended, stories that chronicled the successes and failures, the triumphs, and the tribulations of 2018 through the eyes of our experts in Asia. This week, we invite you to look ahead with us to a still-young 2019, as The Asia Foundation’s country representatives offer their predictions of the stories that will dominate the news from Asia in the coming year. Here, to kick off 2019, are perspectives from our 18 offices in Asia. —John Rieger, editor, InAsia Tiếp tục đọc “2019: The Year Ahead in Asia”

The Best of InAsia 2018

In Asia, December 19, 2018

Season’s Greetings. 2018 has been an eventful year, in Asia and in the stories shared here in the InAsia blog, where I had the pleasure in May to take over the reins from longtime editor Alma Freeman. We’re all grateful, at year’s end, for the continued engagement of our readers, and for the thoughtful contributions of our bloggers, who brought us their unique perspectives and insights on developments in Asia. Here are a few of the year’s most fascinating essays, some of them favorites of our readers and some favorites of yours truly. Enjoy! And be sure to join us in 2019, when our January 2 edition will feature predictions for the year ahead from our country representatives across Asia.

John Rieger
Editor, InAsia

  • From Myanmar, Kim Ninh looked back on an astonishing time in a country suddenly emerging from decades of dictatorship and isolation, and reflected on that country’s remarkable transformation. Matthew Arnold drew on the Foundation’s Myanmar Strategic Support Program for an analysis of the surprising institutional costs of dictatorship—in this case, a lack of institutions or experience to conduct effective policymaking. And economist James Owen took a look at municipalities snapping up the latest technologies to leapfrog traditional developmental hurdles.
  • Tiếp tục đọc “The Best of InAsia 2018”

Challenging the Pacific Powers: China’s Strategic Inroads in Context

This post is reprinted from Michael Green’s foreword to the newly released report from CSIS, China’s Maritime Silk Road: Strategic and Economic Implications for the Indo-Pacific Region.

December 20, 2018
December 20, 2018  |  AMTI BRIEF

Challenging the Pacific Powers: China’s Strategic Inroads in Context

 
The Pacific Islands are emerging as yet another arena of competition between China, the United States, and other powers. Beijing’s influence in the region has surged over the last decade alongside its rapidly growing aid and infrastructure investments. On the sidelines of the 2018 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Papua New Guinea, President Xi Jinping held a high-level meeting with Pacific Island leaders, announcing new partnerships and signing many of them up as official participants in China’s Belt and Road Initiative. While China’s financial assistance has been mostly welcomed by Pacific nations, some recipient countries along with outside parties have begun to express concerns. Many of China’s larger infrastructure projects in the region have provoked the same anxieties as those seen in Southeast Asia, the Indian Ocean, and elsewhere. These include concerns about unsustainable debt levels, political strings attached to Chinese aid, and, in some cases, the potential for China to use port and airport projects as a means of gaining military access to the region. Tiếp tục đọc “Challenging the Pacific Powers: China’s Strategic Inroads in Context”