How China’s Belt and Road Initiative could lead Vietnam away from renewable energy and towards coal

SCMP

Even as China turns away from coal-fired power domestically, its financial institutions continue to fund coal plants overseas, including in countries like Vietnam, which have great potential for wind and solar power generation

Published: 4:00pm, 11 Jun, 2019

A a child on a Saigon waterbus brandishes a pinwheel as he passes Landmark 81, Vietnam’s tallest building, in Ho Chi Minh City on June 6. While Vietnam has enormous potential for wind and solar power generation, funding for coal-power electricity plants under China’s Belt and Road Initiative could derail its renewable energy push. Photo: Reuters
A a child on a Saigon waterbus brandishes a pinwheel as he passes Landmark 81, Vietnam’s tallest building, in Ho Chi Minh City on June 6. While Vietnam has enormous potential for wind and solar power generation, funding for coal-power electricity plants under China’s Belt and Road Initiative could derail its renewable energy push. Photo: Reuters

Continue reading “How China’s Belt and Road Initiative could lead Vietnam away from renewable energy and towards coal”

Advertisements

Too little, too late for US ‘recommitment’ to Mekong countries? China’s already there

scmp

  • As Beijing floods the Mekong with much-needed cash, the US finds itself pushing back against the tide to retain influence
  • But some nations in the region think the competition can work to their advantage
The Greater Mekong Subregion is a 2.6 million sq km area that covers five Asean countries as well as China’s Guangxi region and Yunnan province. Photo: AFP
The Greater Mekong Subregion is a 2.6 million sq km area that covers five Asean countries as well as China’s Guangxi region and Yunnan province. Photo: AFP

US officials say Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will “recommit” the United States to supporting the five countries along Southeast Asia’s longest river, the Mekong, when he makes his first duty visit to Bangkok in July. Continue reading “Too little, too late for US ‘recommitment’ to Mekong countries? China’s already there”

Is Cambodia’s Koh Kong project for Chinese tourists – or China’s military? – Dự án Koh Kong của Campuchia phục vụ mục tiêu quân sự của TQ?

Vietnamese after English

Is Cambodia’s Koh Kong project for Chinese tourists – or China’s military?

  • A tourism development by the Chinese firm Union Development Group looks too good to be true
  • Sceptics say it is – and that its suspiciously long airport runway and deep water port will give China a military foothold in the country
A satellite image of the suspiciously long runway at the airport in Koh Kong. Photo: Handout
A satellite image of the suspiciously long runway at the airport in Koh Kong. Photo: Handout

It’s only natural that Beijing might show an interest in a tourism development that aims to lure big-spending Chinese tourists to the shores of Cambodia with the promise of casinos, golf courses and luxury resorts.

Continue reading “Is Cambodia’s Koh Kong project for Chinese tourists – or China’s military? – Dự án Koh Kong của Campuchia phục vụ mục tiêu quân sự của TQ?”

The Belt and Road Initiative: Views from Washington, Moscow, and Beijing – Sáng kiến “Vành đai và Con đường”: Quan điểm từ Washington, Moskva và Bắc Kinh

Vietnamese after English

The Belt and Road Initiative: Views from Washington, Moscow, and Beijing

Summary:  Despite the BRI’s prevalence in discussions of China’s global engagement, many experts are divided on how to interpret it. Is it a global strategy or just an interregional initiative? How can countries and international companies participate in its growth and development?

Since being unveiled in 2013, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) has become the signature foreign policy project of Chinese President Xi Jinping. The initiative demonstrates China’s growing ambitions at home and abroad and was officially inscribed in the Chinese constitution during the 19th Party Congress, the same congress during which Xi proclaimed a “new era” and the “great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation.”1 It is symbolic of China’s more self-confident foreign policy and departure from the low-profile strategy of “hide and bide” that long characterized Beijing’s global engagement.

Continue reading “The Belt and Road Initiative: Views from Washington, Moscow, and Beijing – Sáng kiến “Vành đai và Con đường”: Quan điểm từ Washington, Moskva và Bắc Kinh”

China’s Xi defends Belt and Road, says ‘not exclusive club’

Update: April, 26/2019 – 11:45  VNA

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks during the opening ceremony of the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing.  — AFP Photo

BEIJING — Chinese President Xi Jinping sought on Friday to ease growing concerns about his ambitious Belt and Road Initiative, vowing to prevent debt risks and saying his global infrastructure project “is not an exclusive club”.

Xi made his remarks at a summit on his signature foreign policy, which aims to reinvent the ancient Silk Road to connect Asia to Europe and Africa through massive investments in maritime, road and rail projects. Continue reading “China’s Xi defends Belt and Road, says ‘not exclusive club’”

Why the Mekong matters – Tại sao Mekong trở nên quan trọng


Development

With Chinese investment likely to be an important part of regional economic development plans — through proposed “special economic zones” (SEZs) and projects like Thailand’s USD 45 billion Eastern Economic Corridor, for example — the LMC has helped not only to shape environmental outcomes along the river but also to shape the economic model in the region. This is strongly aligned with the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), through which China is advancing regional development and integration.

Near Chiang Khong, on the banks of the Mekong where northern Thailand borders Laos, chinadialogue visited a proposed SEZ – a state-supported industrial park offering investment incentives such as tax breaks – that aims to attract foreign investment and export-oriented development.

If it is built, it will destroy a wetland that not only serves as an ecological resource and carbon sink, but for the locals opposed to the development, a critical, communally managed source of fish (they have documented at least 87 different local fish species in their catch, 8 of them endangered), as well as bamboo and herbal medicines. The government and project developers, they claim, have not consulted communities or assessed the environmental impact.

In Laos and Cambodia, SEZs are often regarded as Chinese enclaves, replete with casinos and bars, the most controversial being the Golden Triangle Special Economic Zone on the banks of the Mekong in Laos, home to a very large Chinese-run casino. Environmental NGO Traffic has called it “Ground Zero in the illegal wildlife trade”, where rhinos, Helmeted Hornbill, Gaur, leopards, turtles and the goat-like serow are openly sold.

Inside the Kings Romans Casino in the Golden Triangle Special Economic Zone.

Chinese developers also show a strong interest in developing river navigation for trade. Chinese plans, approved by the Thai government, include extensive blasting of rocks, islets and rapids in Thailand and Laos to enable navigation of larger boats from Yunnan province, in southwestern China.

Accelerated industrial, hydropower and shipping development brings great risks, however, with potentially devastating social, environmental and food security consequences. Without paying greater attention to local environmental and social concerns, not only the reputation of the LMC and its associated projects, but also the future of the Mekong River and its people, are imperilled.

This is the first article in a series about China’s influence in the Mekong region. 

Sam Geall is Executive Editor at chinadialogue, Associate Fellow at Chatham House, and Associate Faculty at University of Sussex. He edited China and the Environment: The Green Revolution (Zed Books, 2013).

TẠI SAO MEKONG TRỞ NÊN QUAN TRỌNG (Why the Mekong matters)

Sam Geall – Bình Yên Đông lược dịch

The Third Pole – November 1, 2018 Mekong-Cuulong Blog

Một nhà hàng nổi và các du thuyền trên sông Lạn Thương (Lancang-Mekong) ở Tây Song Bản Nạp (Xishuangbanna), Vân Nam (Yunnan), Trung Hoa.

[Ảnh: Luc Forsyth/A River’s Tale]

Ảnh hưởng ngày càng tăng của Trung Hoa – qua tổ chức đa phương mới thành lập – đang định hình tương lai kinh tế và môi trường của Đông Nam Á (ĐNA).

Vào tháng 12 năm rồi, Bộ trưởng Ngoại giao Trung Hoa Vương Nghị (Wang Yi) tuyên bố rằng các quốc gia Mekong nên xây dựng một “cộng đồng chia sẻ tương lai.”  Ông cũng nói rằng Chương trình Hợp tác Lancang-Mekong (Lancang-Mekong Cooperation (LMC)) là “thực tiễn và có hiệu quả cao.”  “Chúng tôi không theo đuổi ‘việc đấu láo’ ở trên trời, mà theo đuổi ‘máy ủi đất’ ở dưới đất”.

Trung Hoa đã xoay sở để củng cố ảnh hưởng của mình đối với dòng sông quốc tế trong những năm gần đây, qua một hành động có những ẩn ý quan trọng đối với môi trường ven sông và người dân trông cậy vào tài nguyên của nó.  Phương tiện chính yếu của nó, hay “máy ủi đất”, LMC, sẽ là động lực của các dự án phát triển và thủy điện, đặc khu kinh tế (special economic zones (SEZs)) và mậu dịch.

Nó cũng cho thấy sự thay đổi đường lối của Trung Hoa đối với ĐNA – là chủ đề chánh được thảo luận gần đây trong một diễn đàn về chánh sách do The Third Pole, chinadialogue, Trung tâm Nghiên cứu Phát triển Xã hội (Center for Social Development Studies (CSDS) và Khoa Khoa học Chánh trị của Đại học Chulalongkorn, Bangkok đồng tổ chức.

Chia sẻ dòng sông

Mekong là con sông dài thứ 12 trên thế giới.  Nó bắt nguồn ở Trung Hoa, trên Cao nguyên Tây Tạng (Tibet Plateau), rồi chảy qua Myanmar, Lào, Thái Lan, Cambodia và Việt Nam.  Theo MRC, nó chỉ đứng sau Amazon về đa dạng sinh học và có sản lượng ngư nghiệp nội địa cao nhất thế giới.

Vào năm 1995, Thỏa ước Mekong (Mekong Agreement) – giữa các quốc gia ở hạ lưu là Thái Lan, Lào, Cambodia và Việt Nam – thiết lập Ủy hội sông Mekong (Mekong River Commission (MRC)) để “khuyến khích và hợp tác trong việc quản lý và phát triển khả chấp nguồn nước và tài nguyên liên hệ cho quyền lợi hỗ tương của các quốc gia và thịnh vượng của người dân.”  Trung Hoa không phải là một thành viên chánh thức, nhưng tham gia với tư cách quan sát viên cùng với Myanmar.

Vào năm 2015, Trung Hoa thiết lập một cơ chế đa phương, LMC, bao gồm tất cả 6 quốc gia duyên hà Mekong (tên Trung Hoa gọi là Lạn Thương (Lancang)).  LMC có bộ chỉ huy ở Bắc Kinh (Beijing), phần lớn được Trung Hoa tài trợ, và theo ngôn từ của Thitinan Pongsudhirak của Viện Nghiên cứu Quốc tế và An ninh (Institute of Security and International Studies (ISIS)) tại Đại học Chulalongkorn, nó “làm lu mờ, vượt qua và né tránh” MRC.

LMC đã kiện toàn đáng kể cơ sở của mình trong một thời gian ngắn, và lãnh vực hoạt động của nó vượt ra khỏi nguồn nước và năng lượng: cái gọi là “cơ chế hợp tác 3+5 (3+5 mechanism of cooperation)” của LMC dựa trên 3 trụ cột – chánh trị và an ninh, kinh tế và phát triển khả chấp, và văn hóa và trao đổi dân-với-dân – và 5 ưu tiên: nối kết, khả năng sản xuất, hợp tác kinh tế xuyên biên giới, tài nguyên nước, và nông nghiệp và xóa đói giảm nghèo.

Trước phiên họp thượng đỉnh mới đây ở thủ đô Phnom Penh của Cambodia, Trung Hoa đã cam kết gần 12 tỉ USD (Mỹ Kim) để tài trợ và viện trợ cho Cambodia, Lào, Myanmar, Thái Lan và Việt Nam.  Sau đó, hội nghị thượng đỉnh phê chuẩn Kế hoạch Hành động 5 Năm (Five-Year Plan of Action)  (2018-2022) và một loạt dự án hợp tác mới do Trung Hoa tài trợ.

Ảnh hưởng

Ảnh hưởng tức thời của thế lực ngày càng tăng của LMC hầu như được nhận thấy trong lãnh vực nguồn nước và đập thủy điện. Kể từ năm 1992, khi đập Mạn Loan (Manwan) với công suất 1,57 GW trên sông Lạn Thương ở Vân Nam (Yunnan) bắt đầu hoạt động, rất nhiều đập khác đã được xây.  Có khoảng 60 đập thủy điện lớn và trung bình đang hoạt động dọc theo sông, với khoảng 30 đập đang được xây cất, và hơn 90 đập được dự trù hay đề nghị.

Hầu hết các đập, phần lớn, được xây với kỹ thuật và tài chánh của Trung Hoa, và một số được dùng để cung cấp điện cho vùng duyên hải phía đông của Trung Hoa.  Các đập ở thượng lưu của Trung Hoa có thể điều tiết lưu lượng sông và đã có ảnh hưởng đáng kể đến lưu lượng, cả tiêu cực lẫn tích cực.  Nhưng nhiều ảnh hưởng có thể đoán trước không liên quan trực tiếp đến việc cung cấp nước.

80% của 60 triệu cư dân ở hạ lưu vực Mekong lệ thuộc trực tiếp vào dòng sông để sinh sống.  Cá là nguồn chất đạm chính trong các bữa ăn của gia đình.  Đập đã có ảnh hưởng tiêu cực đối với ngư nghiệp, sinh thái sông, và rẫy ven sông vốn tùy thuộc vào nhịp lũ giàu phù sa tự nhiên của sông.

Cư dân địa phương và các nhà hoạt động nói rằng số cá đánh được đã giảm sút, ngư dân phải chuyển qua nghề nông; rong kai là thức ăn của cá không còn; và rẫy ven sông cần phân bón hóa học vì không còn phù sa.  Những ảnh hưởng nầy được tiên đoán sẽ trở nên tồi tệ: các nhà nghiên cứu cảnh báo rằng an toàn lương thực căn bản của hạ lưu vực Mekong có nhiều nguy cơ bị gián đoạn.

Một đánh giá khoa học độc lập của Trung Hoa cho thấy rằng các đập thủy điện và sự phát triển – mặc dù cung cấp điện, hỗ trợ thủy vận, và duy trì phẩm chất nước – đã làm gián đoạn “tính nối kết (connectivity)” của dòng sông một cách nghiêm trọng: đó là khả năng vận chuyển năng lượng, vật liệu, và sinh vật từ nơi nầy đến nơi khác; phù sa; và đáng kể nhất, thủy sản.  Nó cũng cho thấy rằng thủy học và việc cung cấp nước cũng “tệ hơn.”

Phát triển

Với đầu tư của Trung Hoa hầu như là một phần quan trọng trong các kế hoạch phát triển kinh tế khu vực – qua các SEZs và dự án chẳng hạn như Hành lang Kinh tế Phía đông (Eastern Economic Corridor) trị giá 45 tỉ USD của Thái Lan – LMC không chỉ định hình môi trường dọc theo sông mà còn định hình mô hình kinh tế trong khu vực.  Điều nầy hoàn toàn phù hợp với Sáng kiến Vành đai và Con đường (Belt and Road Initiative (BRI)), qua đó Trung Hoa đang tiến đến hội nhập và phát triển khu vực.

Chinadialogue đến thăm một SEZ được đề nghị ở gần Chiang Khong trên bờ sông Mekong, biên giới thiên nhiên giữa Thái Lan và Lào.  Đây là một khu kỹ nghệ, được nhà nước hỗ trợ qua việc giảm thuế, nhằm mục đích thu hút đầu tư ngoại quốc và phát triển xuất cảng.

Nếu được xây, nó sẽ phá hủy một vùng đất ngập nước không chỉ là tài nguyên sinh thái và bồn hút carbon (carbon sink) mà còn là nguồn cá thiết yếu của cư dân địa phương chống lại dự án (họ đã bắt được ít nhất 87 loại cá khác nhau, trong đó có 8 loại có nguy cơ tuyệt chủng), tre, và dược thảo.  Họ nói rằng chánh phủ và các nhà đầu tư chưa tham vấn với cộng đồng hay đánh giá ảnh hưởng môi trường.

Ở Lào và Cambodia, SEZs được xem như lãnh thổ của Trung Hoa, đầy sòng bài và quán rượu.  SEZ gây tranh cãi nhiều nhất là Đặc khu Kinh tế Tam giác Vàng trên bờ sông Mekong ở Lào, nơi có một sòng bài rất to của Trung Hoa.  Tổ chức NGO về Buôn lậu Môi trường (Environmental NGO Traffic) gọi nó là “Căn cứ của việc buôn bán thú hoang bất hợp pháp (Ground Zero in illegal wildlife trade)”, nơi tê giác, chim mỏ sừng, trâu Ấn Độ, báo, rùa, và sơn dương được bày bán công khai.

Bên trong sòng bài Kings Romans ở Đặc khu Kinh tế Tam giác Vàng.

Các nhà đầu tư Trung Hoa cũng rất chú ý đến việc phát triển thủy vận cho mậu dịch.  Các kế hoạch của Trung Hoa, được chánh phủ Thái Lan chấp thuận, gồm có việc phá đá, cù lao nhỏ, và ghềnh thác ở Thái Lan và Lào để các tàu lớn có thể lui tới tỉnh Vân Nam ở tây nam Trung Hoa.

Nhưng phát triển quá nhanh về kỹ nghệ, thủy điện và thủy vận đem lại những nguy cơ rất cao, với tiềm năng hủy hoại xã hội, môi trường và an ninh lương thực.  Nếu không chú ý nhiều hơn đến môi trường và xã hội, thanh danh của LMC và các dự án liên hệ cũng như tương lai của sông Mekong và cư dân trong vùng sẽ lâm nguy.

Đây là bài đầu tiên của loạt bài về ảnh hưởng của Trung Hoa trong khu vực Mekong.

Sam Geall là Giám đốc Điều hành của chinadialogue, Hội viên của Chatham House, và Giáo sư tại Đại học Sussex.  Ông hiệu đính quyển Trung Hoa và Môi trường: Cuộc cách mạng Xanh (China and the Environment: The Green Revolution) (Zed Books, 2013).

Challenging the Pacific Powers: China’s Strategic Inroads in Context

This post is reprinted from Michael Green’s foreword to the newly released report from CSIS, China’s Maritime Silk Road: Strategic and Economic Implications for the Indo-Pacific Region.

December 20, 2018
December 20, 2018  |  AMTI BRIEF

Challenging the Pacific Powers: China’s Strategic Inroads in Context

 
The Pacific Islands are emerging as yet another arena of competition between China, the United States, and other powers. Beijing’s influence in the region has surged over the last decade alongside its rapidly growing aid and infrastructure investments. On the sidelines of the 2018 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Papua New Guinea, President Xi Jinping held a high-level meeting with Pacific Island leaders, announcing new partnerships and signing many of them up as official participants in China’s Belt and Road Initiative. While China’s financial assistance has been mostly welcomed by Pacific nations, some recipient countries along with outside parties have begun to express concerns. Many of China’s larger infrastructure projects in the region have provoked the same anxieties as those seen in Southeast Asia, the Indian Ocean, and elsewhere. These include concerns about unsustainable debt levels, political strings attached to Chinese aid, and, in some cases, the potential for China to use port and airport projects as a means of gaining military access to the region. Continue reading “Challenging the Pacific Powers: China’s Strategic Inroads in Context”

What are China’s plans for the Belt and Road initiative in ASEAN?

Series:
– What are China’s plans for the Belt and Road initiative in ASEAN?
– How will China’s New Silk Road shape Myanmar’s economy?
– How will China’s New Silk Road change Thailand and Cambodia?
– How is China’s New Silk Road transforming Vietnam and Laos?

The New Silk Road is China’s grand trillion-dollar strategy to link up 65 countries and 4.4 billion people. How will these developments in Indochina impact the rest of ASEAN?

In this episode, we look at massive cross-border economic zones in Myanmar and Yunnan, ASEAN industrial parks in Guangxi, and an ambitious plan for an information Silk Road which will transform the infocomm sectors of several ASEAN countries.

How will China’s New Silk Road change Thailand and Cambodia?

ChannelNewsAsia

Series:
– What are China’s plans for the Belt and Road initiative in ASEAN?
– How will China’s New Silk Road shape Myanmar’s economy?
– How will China’s New Silk Road change Thailand and Cambodia?
– How is China’s New Silk Road transforming Vietnam and Laos?

The New Silk Road is China’s grand trillion-dollar strategy to link up 65 countries and 4.4 billion people. How will these developments in Indochina impact the rest of ASEAN?

Projects such as spectacular casino resorts and mega high-speed railways are being celebrated in Cambodia and Thailand – but have also caused discontent among some locals.

How will China’s New Silk Road shape Myanmar’s economy?

ChannelNewsAsia

Series:
– What are China’s plans for the Belt and Road initiative in ASEAN?
– How will China’s New Silk Road shape Myanmar’s economy?
– How will China’s New Silk Road change Thailand and Cambodia?
– How is China’s New Silk Road transforming Vietnam and Laos?

The New Silk Road is China’s grand trillion-dollar strategy to link up 65 countries and 4.4 billion people.

In this episode, we look at a massive Chinese petrochemical hub which has been built in Kyaukphyu, Myanmar, close to where the Rohingya crisis is still unfolding. How will this project shape Myanmar’s economy?

Trung Quốc ‘mua sạch’ các cảng và gây ảnh hưởng toàn châu Âu

DKN.tv
Tóm tắt bài viết

  • Trên Địa Trung Hải ngày nay, người Trung Quốc là “hải nhân” kiểu mới.
  • Trung Quốc đang lợi dụng nền kinh tế kém hiệu quả, và các quốc gia có sự ác cảm với sự thống trị của châu Âu nhằm tung ra các quỹ đầu tư không giới hạn.
  • Bắc Kinh đã có sự hiện diện đáng kể tại các cảng biển châu Âu, khoảng 3/5 xuất khẩu của Trung Quốc bằng đường biển, và tuyến đường trực tiếp nhất đưa hàng hóa tới châu Âu là Địa Trung Hải.

Trung Quốc gia tăng hiện diện tại châu Âu thông qua dự án Vành đai Con đường, với các khoản đầu tư “mạnh tay” vào các bến cảng tại khu vực Địa Trung Hải. 

Khoảng 3.000 năm về trước, vùng Đông Địa Trung Hải trải qua những giai đoạn trị vì bởi nền văn minh Mycenaeans, đế chế Hittites và Pharaon Rameses III của Ai Cập cổ đại. Continue reading “Trung Quốc ‘mua sạch’ các cảng và gây ảnh hưởng toàn châu Âu”

Chuyên gia: Về bản chất, Vành đai-Con đường vẫn là dự án “săn mồi” dù TQ ra sức bào chữa

Hồng Anh |

Chuyên gia: Về bản chất, Vành đai-Con đường vẫn là dự án "săn mồi" dù TQ ra sức bào chữa
Ảnh: Griffith University.

Thảm họa phát triển sông Mekong đang diễn ra thế nào?

 26/04/2018 

Chiến lược lớn mà Trung Quốc dành cho sông Mekong sẽ tác động ra sao tới con sông và các nước hạ nguồn? Dòng sông Mekong từ lâu đã mang một màu sắc kỳ bí của những cuộc phiêu lưu, những chuyên gia về hoang dã, và các nhà khoa học luôn bị mê hoặc bởi dòng chảy và những thác nước của dòng sông này, cùng với những chú cá heo nước ngọt đang có nguy cơ tuyệt chủng, cá đuối khổng lồ và những con cá sấu Siamese. Sự đa dạng sinh học của dòng sông này chỉ đứng sau sông Amazon. Continue reading “Thảm họa phát triển sông Mekong đang diễn ra thế nào?”

Lao Citizens Displaced by China-Linked Railroad Project Still Not Paid For Losses

A stretch of railroad is shown under construction in Vientiane's Na Xaythong district in an undated photo.

A stretch of railroad is shown under construction in Vientiane’s Na Xaythong district in an undated photo.

RFA

Thousands of Lao families ordered from their land and homes to make way for a high-speed railway linking the country with China are still waiting for compensation promised by their government though construction has surged ahead, sources in the country say.

Plans now call for work on the railway to end in 2021, with Chinese companies promising completion by that date despite the challenges of boring tunnels in mountainous areas of the country’s north.

Landlocked Laos expects the railroad to lower the cost of exports and consumer goods while boosting socioeconomic development in the impoverished nation of nearly 7 million people.

Under Lao Decree 84 issued in April 2016, Lao citizens losing land to development projects must be compensated for lost property and income, with project owners guaranteeing that living conditions for those displaced will be at least as good as they were before the project began.

In Chaengsavang village in the Na Xaythong district of the capital Vientiane, meanwhile, construction crews have measured and staked out the railroad’s proposed route and begun to build, though no one has spoken yet to affected households about compensation, a local resident recently told RFA’s Lao Service Continue reading “Lao Citizens Displaced by China-Linked Railroad Project Still Not Paid For Losses”